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Old 05-10-2017, 11:51 PM   #1
M_W
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Question Finding a Good Backup Program


I'm trying to find a suitable backup program to use, but am having a hard time finding something that does everything I need it to.

I'd like it to be free, preferably open-source, bootable from a USB drive, able to backup my entire dual-boot system, able to (easily) extract single files from the backup, and just be overall reliable and well maintained. Does such a thing exist?

Clonezilla is as close as I've come, and I really want to use it, but being unable to (easily) extract single files from the backup is keeping me from it. Yes, it is possible to create an image file from the backup and mount it, but that requires having a lot of free disk space, and not to mention a whole lot of time.

I've looked into Mondo Rescue, but it doesn't appear to be bootable from a USB drive and seems to be more geared towards making CD friendly backups.
Most other open source options I've found are either old and no longer updated, or are missing certain features that I want.

There are a few closed-source programs out there that seem pretty decent, but I'm not sure which ones are trustworthy. One that I've tried is AOMEI, and it actually seems to be able to do most everything I want. However, I'm a little uneasy being as it's from a Chinese company with poor English, and the fact that it's the free version of paid software.

EaseUS and Macrium are a couple other options that I plan to look into as well.


Just having a hard time finding something that fits the bill for me. I really wish Clonezilla made it easier to extract individual files, because it has everything I need otherwise.
 
Old 05-11-2017, 12:13 AM   #2
syg00
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One of the long term users here has recommended EaseUS. Good recommendation IMHO, but I've never looked at it.

I tend to take a different approach, and use whatever Win ships with to get a system restore image, and throw that in a drawer somewhere. For Linux I can always build a new system with whatever drivers are needed at the time (say I have to get new kit).
My only interest is my data. I have always been partial to rsync because I can get to my data when I need to without another tool. Currently I'm looking to use rsnapshot for "normal" Linux filesystems. I will manage what goes where, when, and it will all directly mountable on my backup system (used to be a goFlex Home pseudo NAS that I hacked to run Arch Linux and do what I need).
I have used Mondo in the past, but it was ssllloooowww - even just writing iso's to a disk. Seemed to work ok thought. For Linux "one-off" backups I use fsarchiver, but is a single (checked) file for the entire filesystem. Again, handy to take and throw in a drawer for when I royally foul something like a hardware upgrade up.
 
Old 05-12-2017, 09:07 AM   #3
M_W
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Ended up going with Macrium Reflect Free. I tried out EaseUS, AOMEI, Paragon, and Macrium. EaseUS just didn't jive with me and felt more like a free trial rather than a free version. AOMEI seemed pretty good but just didn't feel as well built or as powerful as Macrium. Paragon didn't seem too bad either, but again, compared to Macrium it just didn't seem that great.

Another thing about EaseUS and AOMEI: Are they by the same company? They both have the same publisher names on the Windows installer confirmation pop up (CHENDU-something?) and then there's the fact that their program icons are extremely similar. Just seems kind of odd to me.

Anyway, Macrium just felt to be the best out of the bunch and is able to do pretty much everything I need it to. Plenty of features in the free version so that it doesn't feel very restrictive. The bootable rescue media works well too.

I still wish Clonezilla made it easier to browse through its backup files, but I'm feeling pretty happy with Macrium.
 
Old 05-12-2017, 02:02 PM   #4
fatmac
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Quote:
I'd like it to be free, preferably open-source, bootable from a USB drive, able to backup my entire dual-boot system, able to (easily) extract single files from the backup, and just be overall reliable and well maintained. Does such a thing exist?
Take a look at 'tar'. Most 'live' distros will include it.
 
Old 05-12-2017, 05:03 PM   #5
jefro
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Many of the live boot media can actually install programs though the package manager.

You can create your own live media with program installed. Best case might be a usb installed native.

Clonezilla uses common programs so almost any distro should be able to use the backup to some degree.

You may not need an entire image of your drive. While I like to do it that way, your needs may only be some set of files. Rsync, tar, gpio and cp may be used. Oddly enough dd can be used for less than drive sizes. Most ways to copy can include compression usually defaults to 5(?) on scale of 1 to 9 sort of deal.

Acronis has been pretty good about their products and the features over the years. Some of the hard drive makers have a free version is you own one of their drives. The recovery media is limited to Linux bootable media. You have to pay for the WinPE feature but if you need it you can always buy it and just keep the backups safe till then.
 
  


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