LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software
User Name
Password
Linux - Software This forum is for Software issues.
Having a problem installing a new program? Want to know which application is best for the job? Post your question in this forum.

Notices


Closed Thread
  Search this Thread
Old 07-19-2006, 07:42 AM   #1
Geminias
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Posts: 201

Rep: Reputation: 30
File Recovery Software (URGENT)


Hello again. I have decided to make the switch to Linux and never use Windows XP again. (Believe me, I hate the thought of putting away a system with a ease-of-use/performance ratio that seems to equal the convolution-of-use/lack-of-performance ratio in linux.) To tell you the truth I've never hated computers so much since I started using Linux, but that is neither here nor there...


TO THE POINT: I need one of those programs that can scan data regardless of what the partition information reads and give me the ability to more than less drag and drop my data safely into a linux folder. So it would need to support NTFS. Also it would need to be free because I am a very poor guy. NOTE: that is not why I am switching to linux. In fact it is probably cheaper to use windows since at least in windows I know how to steal everything I need including patching trial versions, etc... Linux offers free software but charges you for the training you'll need in order to get it working (haha).

MORE INFO: The partition table is inaccurate on the disk. The windows partition information is all inaccurate. I can see that it is there in fdisk, but I cannot do anything with it in terms of mounting it. Since I'm not using winXP anymore and I have linux installed on the same hard drive I need to recover that data on the winXP partition using Linux.

MORE INFORMATION: I screwed up the partition table and the boot sector and the windows boot loader by running the command in Grub: setup(hd0,0) instead of setup(hd0,0) and to top it off I ran fixboot and fixmbr in windows recovery which then gave me the message: "Invalid partition table" when i restarted the computer.

URGENT: The faster I can recover that information from my ntfs partition the faster I can remove the ntfs partition and properly install linux, so please, anyone, I'm asking you with creases of desperation around my sweat stained face, please find me the aforementioned software.
 
Old 07-19-2006, 08:11 AM   #2
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Mint
Posts: 17,808

Rep: Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742
You are asking some similar questions to what you had in two other threads. It would be better to stay a bit more focussed--ie one question at a time, one thread at a time.

Are you looking for Linux-based SW to recover files on damaged NTFS partitions? My hunch is that recovery will be much more straightforward with Windows-based SW. Do you not have the ability to run Windows?

One option may be to put the damaged disk into another Windows computer and work on it from there.

Quote:
NOTE: that is not why I am switching to linux. In fact it is probably cheaper to use windows since at least in windows I know how to steal everything I need including patching trial versions, etc... Linux offers free software but charges you for the training you'll need in order to get it working (haha).
What are we supposed to do with this? Should we be impressed that you know how to steal Windows SW?
 
Old 07-19-2006, 08:26 AM   #3
Geminias
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Posts: 201

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
Are you looking for Linux-based SW to recover files on damaged NTFS partitions?
Quote:
I need one of those programs that can scan data regardless of what the partition information reads and give me the ability to more than less drag and drop my data safely into a linux folder. So it would need to support NTFS.
Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
My hunch is that recovery will be much more straightforward with Windows-based SW.
What a big surprise that is...

Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
Do you not have the ability to run Windows?
Yes. Although in Windows all the recovery software I could find was limited to demo versions or didn't offer the kind of capability required. If worst comes to worst I will patch a demo version of a software I do need, but this is what I consider a last resort. People that know of free software that I can use are welcome to post a link.

I just thought that since linux is so awesome it would have a really awesome file recovery software being as it can't support many hardwares or play games very well and it likes to crash quite a bit to. I wonder if there is any advantage to using 64bit? At the moment I am convinced to switch to fc5 32bit.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pixellany
You are asking some similar questions to what you had in two other threads. It would be better to stay a bit more focussed--ie one question at a time, one thread at a time.
Look, I am trying my hardest to learn linux but it seems the problems i'm having are not well known to people at this forum and the answers are not, shall we say, forthcoming. I began with wanting to fix my partition table, no one knew how. So I'm resorting to data recovery - note the difference? So i started a new thread being as this is a different topic. Linux abuses me enough, I don't need you to double team me with it.

Last edited by Geminias; 07-19-2006 at 08:32 AM.
 
Old 07-19-2006, 09:19 AM   #4
oneandoneis2
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: London, England
Distribution: Ubuntu
Posts: 1,460

Rep: Reputation: 48
Linux software is geared up for Linux filesystems: NTFS is a proprietary file system that is poorly supported by Linux at present.

Given your apparent low opinion of Linux, tho, I'm amazed you're bothering to switch at all. . .
 
Old 07-19-2006, 10:26 AM   #5
weibullguy
ReliaFree Maintainer
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan
Distribution: Slackware 14.2
Posts: 2,815
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 261Reputation: 261Reputation: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geminias
Hello again. I have decided to make the switch to Linux and never use Windows XP again. (Believe me, I hate the thought of putting away a system with a ease-of-use/performance ratio that seems to equal the convolution-of-use/lack-of-performance ratio in linux.) To tell you the truth I've never hated computers so much since I started using Linux, but that is neither here nor there...
Hello Linux aficionados. I think your OS is junk, but could you help me? Yeah, I've always heard vinegar catches more flies than honey.

Quote:
Linux offers free software but charges you for the training you'll need in order to get it working (haha).
As opposed to other OS vendors who provide all the free training you need? Anyway, I don't believe the answers at LQ cost anything.

Quote:
I can see that it is there in fdisk, but I cannot do anything with it in terms of mounting it.
How have you tried mounting it? Does it give you any error messages that we may be able to help with? Maybe you're just doing something wrong.

Quote:
I screwed up the partition table and the boot sector and the windows boot loader by running the command in Grub: setup(hd0,0) instead of setup(hd0,0)
There is no difference between these commands and it's not the only one you need to issue to install GRUB properly. Possibly another user-created problem that we can help with?

Quote:
I just thought that since linux is so awesome it would have a really awesome file recovery software being as it can't support many hardwares or play games very well and it likes to crash quite a bit to. I wonder if there is any advantage to using 64bit? At the moment I am convinced to switch to fc5 32bit.
It does have file recovery software, it's called TUBUHIDP. It's free and the tools come with every Linux distro AFAIK.

If you don't like 64-bit Linux then you won't like 32-bit Linux any better. You probably won't notice a difference.

I also have to wonder why you're switching to Linux only. You obviously struggle with it and it may not be for you.
 
Old 07-19-2006, 10:50 AM   #6
unSpawn
Moderator
 
Registered: May 2001
Posts: 29,415
Blog Entries: 55

Rep: Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594Reputation: 3594
The first thing to do is make a backup of the disk. This way you have a copy with fixated, unalterable data while you mess up more things. Next you'll want to check out tools like Gpart and Testdisk to see if you can unfsck your handiwork on the partiton table. If that ain't working and all you can do is try and salvage data, then look into Foremost and NTFSundelete. As for drag-n-drop you're SOL.

Last edited by unSpawn; 07-19-2006 at 10:52 AM.
 
Old 07-19-2006, 11:43 AM   #7
Geminias
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Posts: 201

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 30
Thanks unSpawn I'll look into those tools.

Awol, about 64bit I was asking are there any advantages? It seems the software is not ready to utilize the hardware and in regard to mplayer and the java plugin 64 bit seems to almost be more of a problem than it is a benifit.

About mounting, you can take my word for it that it won't mount properly.

And I should edit my post: I meant to say setup (hd0) for one of them.

About me not liking Linux, that's very true. I personally think that, after testing the operability of FC5, Microsoft has a point when it says open source software will inhibit technological inginuity. In Linux people half-ass everything. A program that does not have a GUI is a program that someone half-assed, because if they were making the program for anyone but themselves they would have designed something for the benifit of others and not just for themselves. Command line is very demanding in terms of human brain memory usage. And what happens when a newer program comes out with an altered syntax? That memory is now dormant as it will never again be needed. GUI's provide a user with the ability to quickly (without having to read a 20 page manual) figure out how the program can be used. That isn't asking too much, it's common courtesy.

Plus, Linux seems to be fundamentally flawed. Every time you have to update the kernal you have to reinstall all kinds of things that will no longer work? Umm? I could understand if there was a huge performance increase, but we are talking a loss and no gain.

Note that this argument is one-sided, I'm not saying Windows rox. Windows also sucks, but it is strong where linux is weak especially in terms of support. Windows is truly built for the user, to accomodate him, to make him feel at home where as Linux is a fierce and untamed beast. The user is to tred at his own risk.

Eventually I'll help make Linux or perhaps a new operating system altogether, become the ultimate OS, so don't look at me like I'm some kind of war mongerer. I have to point out the flaws in order to fix them.

Again thanks for the help.
 
Old 07-19-2006, 02:11 PM   #8
weibullguy
ReliaFree Maintainer
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan
Distribution: Slackware 14.2
Posts: 2,815
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 261Reputation: 261Reputation: 261
Quote:
about 64bit I was asking are there any advantages? It seems the software is not ready to utilize the hardware and in regard to mplayer and the java plugin 64 bit seems to almost be more of a problem than it is a benifit.
Like I said, you probably won't notice a difference. I run a 32-bit Fedora Core 5 and a 64-bit Kubuntu on the same machine. To me, there is no perceivable difference. However, I also run a 64-bit Gentoo. There is a perceptable difference with Gentoo. But, I think that has more to do with the lack of un-needed fluff than twice as many bits. So from that perspective, there's probably not much advantage.

On the other hand, you won't run 64-bit apps under a 32-bit OS. Generally speaking, 64-bit OS allows backward compatibility. Eventually, there will be a 64-bit java plugin for Firefox until then you can use 32-bits and upgrade the plugin. If you use a 32-bit OS, you have to upgrade the OS before you can upgrade to the 64-bit plugin. Similarly for hardware support. You may only have 2GB of RAM today, but with a 64-bit OS you can take advatage of 16GB in the future.

So I would say the advantage is in long-term maintenance/administration of your machine. As a disclaimer, I'm speaking from the viewpoint of a desktop user not a system admin or similar.

That being said, I don't agree that the lack of GUI makes a program half-a**ed. A GUI does NOT mean that a program magically becomes inuitive. Some programs don't benefit from a GUI anyway. The CLI offers alot of commands and even more switches and I doubt any one person remembers them all. But it doesn't take too long to remember the ones you use regularly. And I still use the same copy command and switches in WinXP that I used in DOS 3.0. So I don't see the validity of your dormancy argument either.

You don't ever HAVE to update your kernel. There's plenty of people that are still happily using a 2.4 kernel. If you've got a stable system and the new kernel doesn't offer anything you need, why would you update? And if you use the TUBUHIDP tool, rolling back changes is reasonably simple. The need to update/upgrade other software when the OS is updated is not limited to Linux by any stretch of the imagination.

If Windows is so much stronger than Linux in terms of support, why did you come to a Linux forum to ask for help recovering your Windows filesystem?
 
Old 07-19-2006, 02:43 PM   #9
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Mint
Posts: 17,808

Rep: Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742Reputation: 742
Quote:
A program that does not have a GUI is a program that someone half-assed, because if they were making the program for anyone but themselves they would have designed something for the benifit of others and not just for themselves. Command line is very demanding in terms of human brain memory usage. And what happens when a newer program comes out with an altered syntax? That memory is now dormant as it will never again be needed. GUI's provide a user with the ability to quickly (without having to read a 20 page manual) figure out how the program can be used. That isn't asking too much, it's common courtesy.
This is nonsense. Linux gives you the power of CLI, but you are not required to use it in normal usage. The fact is, however, that--once you learn a few simple CLI commands, it is often EASIER to do things that way--not harder.
Linux distros generally have VERY GOOD GUIs these days.


Quote:
Plus, Linux seems to be fundamentally flawed. Every time you have to update the kernal you have to reinstall all kinds of things that will no longer work? Umm? I could understand if there was a huge performance increase, but we are talking a loss and no gain.
More nonsense. first, noone is requiring you to update the kernel. Second, if you update the kernel using your package manager, then all of your standard SW will be fine.

You seem to be saying the the power and flexibility of Linux is something that you see as a negative. So don't use all the tools--don't change your kernel. If you object on moral grounds to an OS having power and flexibility, then I don't know how we can help you.

Perhaps you could tell us the OS that you DO like......
 
Old 07-19-2006, 04:05 PM   #10
reddazz
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: N. E. England
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Debian
Posts: 16,298

Rep: Reputation: 77
Please do not post the same questions in more than one forum. Picking the most relevant forum and posting it once there makes it easier for other members to help you and keeps the discussion all in one place.

http://www.linuxquestions.org/rules.php
Thread Closed. Anyone who wants to follow the previous discussions should look here and here.

Last edited by reddazz; 07-19-2006 at 04:06 PM.
 
  


Closed Thread


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Urgent Help In Recovery khaleel5000 Linux - Software 3 10-30-2005 01:27 AM
help in recovery , URGENT khaleel5000 Linux - Newbie 2 10-29-2005 02:57 PM
Urgent Help In Recovery khaleel5000 SUSE / openSUSE 1 10-29-2005 12:21 PM
urgent help in recovery khaleel5000 Linux - General 1 10-29-2005 12:21 PM
urgent!data recovery! mathman0 Linux - Software 1 01-18-2005 02:54 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Software

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:11 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration