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Old 01-13-2005, 04:42 AM   #1
the mac 13
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Difference?


i was wondering.. whats the difference when i download source code and binaries? also, whast the diffrence between .rpn and .tar.gz? how do i go about installing them?

from my limited linux knowledge, i maybe know that .rpn is very .exe where u can double click and install. is that true?
 
Old 01-13-2005, 05:00 AM   #2
or1onas
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source packages need to be compiled.
binaries are ready to be installed.

tar.gz is archived & zipped source packages.
you unzip them, then compile them and then install them...

rpm's are based on red hat's package management 'system' which is widely spread nowadays in almost every distro...

they're usually compiled (except if you get a src.rpm) and you install them with the 'rpm' command or with the distro's relevant gui app...

you could say that rpm is like an .msi installer in windows...

Last edited by or1onas; 01-13-2005 at 05:02 AM.
 
Old 01-13-2005, 05:15 AM   #3
perfect_circle
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there is no rpn. You probably mean rpm.

when you write a program you write it in text (source) according to the syntax of a programming language, then u use a special program called compiler that creates the executable (binaries).

In windows you mostly get the executables in an self extracting format.
You double click the installer and the program installs itself in your pc.
The source code of most windows apps including the OS itself is not known to u.

the tar.gz is a compressed form, like .zip
and you decompress it though a command like
tar -xvzf <blablabla>.tar.gz

tar converts multiple files/fonders into a single file without compressing it and then gzip (gz) compresses the single file.
You get source code mostly though this format.

RPM is Redhat packet manager.
a program in rpm format is packed ready to be installed.
rpm contains mostly binaries (src.rpm is for source)

Quote:
from my limited linux knowledge, i maybe know that .rpn is very .exe where u can double click and install. is that true?
That depends. If *.rpm files are associated with a packet manager application.

The sipliest way to install an rpm is:
rpm -ihv packetname.rpm

Use google for more info.

Last edited by perfect_circle; 01-13-2005 at 05:16 AM.
 
Old 01-13-2005, 05:19 AM   #4
perfect_circle
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I'm socked !!!
you are using 5 linux distros and you don't know that?
 
Old 01-13-2005, 10:12 AM   #5
the mac 13
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coz i am a newbie. actually i have no probs with installing opera. also, i dont install apps on my 5 types of distros.. nothing to install.. other than opera.. oh well..
 
Old 01-13-2005, 10:17 AM   #6
or1onas
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IMHO, it would be better to stick to a certain distro as a newbie.
There are quite a few differences between them which could lead to many problems if not experienced...
Having 5 different distros will probably drive u crazy :-)
 
Old 01-13-2005, 01:55 PM   #7
reddazz
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True, as a newbie try not to run too many distros until you are familiar with at least one Linux distro so that you understand the basics.
 
Old 01-13-2005, 05:38 PM   #8
the mac 13
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actually i dont run all 5 at a time. like im bored of mandrake n lycoris. i deleted n then installed fc3!
 
  


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