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Old 07-02-2016, 03:03 AM   #1
hack3rcon
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Post Clear BIOS from Linux.


Hello.
Can I clear my BIOS via Linux? Windows OS provide a CMD command that with some assembly language command you can clear BIOS.

Thank you.
 
Old 07-02-2016, 07:31 AM   #2
HMW
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I am unsure what you mean by 'clear'. But why don't you simply boot into bios and do whatever you need to do from there?

Best regards,
HMW
 
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Old 07-02-2016, 09:41 AM   #3
Habitual
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Reboot the physical machine and enter the CMOS.
"some assembly language"? I could wipe the /mbr and some with debug.exe but I never heard of, nor saw any similar routine for "clear"ing a BIOS.
Whatever that means.

Any details of this endeavor, IMO are futile, as BIOSs/CMOSs integration is not what it used to be.
In the Pre-NT days, you could nuke your mbr with debug.exe, but since? Not sure you can "clear the BIOS",
Whatever that means.

Just an observation.
 
Old 07-02-2016, 09:48 AM   #4
hack3rcon
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I mean is BIOS password.
 
Old 07-02-2016, 10:15 AM   #5
HMW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hack3rcon View Post
I mean is BIOS password.
The mystery deepens... I have yet to stumble over a BIOS with a password that I haven't set myself!
 
Old 07-03-2016, 07:12 PM   #6
sgosnell
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Your best bet is to remember the BIOS password which you set. If you didn't set it, get whomever did set it to give you the password.
 
Old 07-08-2016, 08:57 AM   #7
sundialsvcs
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Many of the "stories of Windows," today, are legends, dating from the earliest days when Windows did not have any sort of protection. (Nor did it need any, because computers by-and-large were not connected to one another.) Operating systems ran "in Real mode." Having one megabyte of RAM was an expensive luxury. A 20-megabyte hard drive was "huge." If you did have a network in your office, it probably used coax. If you wanted to have a phone in your car, you needed a really long piece of wire. And, so on.

Today, all operating systems provide a protected environment, and use virtual storage, so that "user-land" programs can only see what they're allowed to see, and can only touch what they're allowed to touch. Even the prerogatives of the "all-powerful" (sic) root user are restricted, and, in the latest versions, are becoming even more so.

So, you can't touch the BIOS, or its modern-day equivalent. You can't even see it. And, on most motherboards, it is physically write-protected from such software that can see it.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 07-08-2016 at 09:00 AM.
 
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Old 07-15-2016, 10:42 AM   #8
dave@burn-it.co.uk
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No you cannot - it is protected except from the programs designed to update it.

If you are thinking of running a program to hack into BIOS passworded system that stops access ..........
 
Old 07-15-2016, 10:57 AM   #9
beachboy2
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hack3rcon,

Are you trying to hack something like this Dell E6420 with a BIOS password?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Dell-Latit...oAAOSwyjBW6CiO
 
Old 07-15-2016, 11:08 AM   #10
erik2282
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Try Google searching, How to clear bios password on {enter make/model of computer here).
 
Old 07-15-2016, 11:17 AM   #11
cwizardone
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I don't know about the "latest and greatest," but every motherboard I've owned in the past had a set pins that if "shorted" would clear the BIOS.
 
Old 07-15-2016, 12:17 PM   #12
Emerson
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Flashrom?
 
Old 07-15-2016, 03:11 PM   #13
Ser Olmy
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On many laptops the BIOS password is stored in flash memory, and in those cases flashrom may indeed get the job done. Unlike vendor-specific BIOS flash tools, it will reprogram the entire flash chip, instead of just the parts containing updated code. Hence, it may very well wipe the password in the process.

On desktop PCs, the BIOS password is stored in the CMOS RAM inside the RTC chip, which one can access through I/O ports $70 and $71 ($70 is the index register and $71 is the data in/out port; see this page for more information and some examples in C).

The first 12 bytes of the CMOS RAM are actually the RTC clock, but the remaining 52+ bytes are used to hold various CMOS settings and possibly the password. Note that since there's almost always a checksum at the end, changing a single byte is enough to trigger a CMOS checksum error message upon reboot, which in turn tends to let you access the BIOS setup utility without entering a password.
 
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Old 07-15-2016, 03:41 PM   #14
beachboy2
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Before anybody dashes off to employ flashrom, it may be a good idea to first check that their particular hardware is supported:

https://www.flashrom.org/Supported_hardware
 
Old 07-15-2016, 03:46 PM   #15
Emerson
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And some hacking may be needed, last time I used flashrom it erased the MAC address of onboard NIC and I had helluva time putting it back.
 
  


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