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Old 06-25-2010, 02:49 PM   #1
ternarybit
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Can someone please interpret this kernel oops?


Running Debian Lenny x86_64 & been having a maddening time with hard locks and system corruption. Check this thread for more background on the situation.

My computer did hard lock again, resulting in another broken Debian install. Not exactly before the hard lock that killed my computer, but shortly before, my kernel "oopsed" and spit this out. I was installing rsnapshot from the Lenny repos when it oopsed:

Code:
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509850] dpkg[5979] general protection ip:40afb0 sp:7fff71bc8968 error:0 in dpkg[400000+61000]
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509909] CPU 2 
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509911] Modules linked in: michael_mic arc4 ecb crypto_blkcipher fglrx(P) appletalk nfsd lockd nfs_acl auth_rpcgss sunrpc exportfs ppdev parport_pc lp parport ipv6 cpufreq_conservative cpufreq_userspace cpufreq_stats cpufreq_ondemand freq_table cpufreq_powersave fuse coretemp w83627ehf hwmon_vid vboxdrv sbp2 loop snd_hda_intel ieee80211_crypt_tkip snd_seq snd_seq_device wl(P) snd_pcm i2c_i801 i82975x_edac i2c_core rng_core button snd_timer serio_raw edac_core snd pcspkr joydev soundcore ieee80211_crypt psmouse snd_page_alloc evdev ext3 jbd mbcache raid1 md_mod sg sr_mod sd_mod cdrom ata_piix ata_generic usb_storage usbhid hid ff_memless ohci1394 floppy ieee1394 ide_pci_generic piix ahci ehci_hcd libata scsi_mod dock uhci_hcd jmicron ide_core thermal processor fan thermal_sys [last unloaded: scsi_wait_scan]
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509946] Pid: 5979, comm: dpkg Tainted: P          2.6.26-2-amd64 #1
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509947] RIP: 0010:[<ffffffff80287669>]  [<ffffffff80287669>] page_remove_rmap+0xff/0x11a
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509952] RSP: 0000:ffff81009d415be8  EFLAGS: 00010246
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509953] RAX: 0000000000000000 RBX: ffffe200029369d0 RCX: 000000000000d9e7
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509955] RDX: ffff810080a60000 RSI: 0000000000000046 RDI: 0000000000000286
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509957] RBP: ffff81011c54a4a8 R08: 0000000000674000 R09: ffff81009d415600
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509958] R10: 0000000000000000 R11: 0000000000000010 R12: ffff81013cdd6c40
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509960] R13: 0000000000674000 R14: ffffe200029369d0 R15: ffff810001037b80
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509961] FS:  0000000000000000(0000) GS:ffff81013fa9f0c0(0000) knlGS:0000000000000000
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509963] CS:  0010 DS: 0000 ES: 0000 CR0: 000000008005003b
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509964] CR2: 00000000031fa888 CR3: 000000009d052000 CR4: 00000000000006e0
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509966] DR0: 0000000000000000 DR1: 0000000000000000 DR2: 0000000000000000
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509967] DR3: 0000000000000000 DR6: 00000000ffff0ff0 DR7: 0000000000000400
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509969] Process dpkg (pid: 5979, threadinfo ffff81009d414000, task ffff81013f1dc180)
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509970] Stack:  00000000bc676065 00000000bc676065 ffff81009d4a83a0 ffffffff8027f6be
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509974]  ffff81013cdd6f18 0000000000000000 ffff81009d415cf8 ffffffffffffffff
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509976]  0000000000000000 ffff81011c54a4a8 ffff81009d415d00 00000000003b5fd4
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509978] Call Trace:
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509981]  [<ffffffff8027f6be>] ? unmap_vmas+0x4c9/0x885
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509992]  [<ffffffff80283ae9>] ? exit_mmap+0x7c/0xf0
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509996]  [<ffffffff80232674>] ? mmput+0x2c/0xa2
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.509999]  [<ffffffff802379e9>] ? do_exit+0x25a/0x6a6
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510003]  [<ffffffff80237ea2>] ? do_group_exit+0x6d/0x9d
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510006]  [<ffffffff80240203>] ? get_signal_to_deliver+0x302/0x324
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510010]  [<ffffffff8020b2aa>] ? do_notify_resume+0xaf/0x7fc
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510013]  [<ffffffff802354a7>] ? printk+0x4e/0x56
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510016]  [<ffffffff8022bea4>] ? task_rq_lock+0x4d/0x7f
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510022]  [<ffffffff8023e3fa>] ? signal_wake_up+0x21/0x30
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510024]  [<ffffffff8023e8b0>] ? send_signal+0x1bf/0x1db
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510030]  [<ffffffff8020c5b4>] ? retint_signal+0x50/0x9c
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510037] 
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510037] 
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510039]  RSP <ffff81009d415be8>
Jun 23 09:47:21 lyssa kernel: [ 3584.510039] ---[ end trace 354ceeafb064bf8d ]---
I was running an open shell prompt which also spit this out:

Code:
Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.509879] Eeek! page_mapcount(page) went negative! (-1)

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.509881]   page pfn = bc676

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.509882]   page->flags = 10000000000083c

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.509883]   page->count = 2

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.509884]   page->mapping = ffff81011613ab50

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.509898]   vma->vm_ops = 0x0

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.509905] ------------[ cut here ]------------

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.509908] invalid opcode: 0000 [1] SMP 

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
 kernel:[ 3584.510038] Code: 80 e8 4f e7 fc ff 48 8b 85 90 00 00 00 48 85 c0 74 19 48 8b 40 20 48 85 c0 74 10 48 8b 70 58 48 c7 c7 44 48 4b 80 e8 2a e7 fc ff <0f> 0b eb fe 8b 77 18 5a 5b 5d 83 e6 01 f7 de 83 c6 04 e9 95 54
Any ideas what all that means?

BTW I checked the syslog after the hard lock occurred and I found no entries at that time. when my system locks, apparently everything freezes including the kernel.

One thought: even though my CPU, GPU & RAM are cooled sufficiently, I reached in and touched the heatsink on my northbridge which was surprisingly too hot to touch. Could an overheating northbridge cause such a lock? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!

-Austin

Last edited by ternarybit; 06-25-2010 at 02:50 PM.
 
Old 06-26-2010, 10:05 AM   #2
business_kid
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Quote:
Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
kernel:[ 3584.509879] Eeek! page_mapcount(page) went negative! (-1)

Message from syslogd@lyssa at Jun 23 09:47:21 ...
kernel:[ 3584.509908] invalid opcode: 0000 [1] SMP
These are really good! Congratulations on catching such werrors! Now to try explaining them: Paging stuff is about your ram; You have ram in there, and the system sees it as a block here, and a block there, etc in the (huge) address space of a cpu. So it uses these pages, and pretends it's all one continuous block. Now something definitely went wrong there.

Invalid opcode might be: As the cpu only reads machine code, all the fancy languages are translated into machine code. This comes in the form of
instruction [operand] [operand]
as each instruction takes 0,1,or 2 operands

If the cpu doesn't recognize the instruction, it will grab the next thing (operand) and interpret that as an instruction. This leads to the most wonderful crashes. Fortunately the kernel saw this coming down the tracks and took a pistol to the offending process.

Make sure of your cooling. Check - double check that your chipset is supported in the kernel. Put fans on things that get too hot. You'll probably see from the logs if the chipset is supported. Find out about magic keys for rescuing a hung box. Then, if nothing else works, join the lmkl and bleat there.
 
Old 06-26-2010, 11:01 AM   #3
catkin
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If you have more than one memory module and they are say 250 MB or more, try removing all but one and see if the problem goes away; if it does then put another one back in and test again; if it does not then replace it with one of the others.
 
Old 06-28-2010, 01:25 PM   #4
ternarybit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by business_kid View Post
These are really good! Congratulations on catching such werrors! Now to try explaining them: Paging stuff is about your ram; You have ram in there, and the system sees it as a block here, and a block there, etc in the (huge) address space of a cpu. So it uses these pages, and pretends it's all one continuous block. Now something definitely went wrong there.

Invalid opcode might be: As the cpu only reads machine code, all the fancy languages are translated into machine code. This comes in the form of
instruction [operand] [operand]
as each instruction takes 0,1,or 2 operands

If the cpu doesn't recognize the instruction, it will grab the next thing (operand) and interpret that as an instruction. This leads to the most wonderful crashes. Fortunately the kernel saw this coming down the tracks and took a pistol to the offending process.

Make sure of your cooling. Check - double check that your chipset is supported in the kernel. Put fans on things that get too hot. You'll probably see from the logs if the chipset is supported. Find out about magic keys for rescuing a hung box. Then, if nothing else works, join the lmkl and bleat there.
Thank you very much for your knowledgeable response. I really appreciate your time!

1) I heavily suspected a RAM issue, but 2 days ago I ran memtest for 6+ hours on each individual DIMM one at a time, and 12+ hours with both. I am running memtest86+ v3.3 from Ultimate Boot CD. Is it possible that my RAM is still bad after these tests showed no problems?

2) I ran Mersenne Prime Test from UBCD for 9+ hours, even in a hot environment, with no errors/warnings, lockups or other errata. Is this sufficient proof that my CPU and cooler work OK?

3) Based on LQ's HCL my motherboard is compatible with the Linux kernel.

4) What are the "magic keys for rescuing a hung box?" Please do tell, I've wondered about this for some time now. Ctrl+Esc, Ctrl+Alt+Del & Ctrl+Alt+Backspace don't do anything during the hangs. Alt+F2 and other command prompt keys don't work either.

5) I put a rather large aftermarket copper cooler on my northbridge, but that hasn't changed anything.

Once again, I appreciate your input and help! Thank you.

-Austin
 
Old 06-29-2010, 05:01 AM   #5
business_kid
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So all the hardware works. . . yet is is coughing up a lot of nasty stuff. Are we overclocking? Could it be disk corruption. Are we on the limits of some area speedwise? Have you 2 hard disks on the same ide cable? IDE & cdrom? Is there a heat issue?

The instructions your computer is executing are not whet was written for it. What exactly crashes? Have you checked the md5 checksums of any large files?
 
Old 06-29-2010, 03:28 PM   #6
ternarybit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by business_kid View Post
So all the hardware works. . . yet is is coughing up a lot of nasty stuff. Are we overclocking? Could it be disk corruption. Are we on the limits of some area speedwise? Have you 2 hard disks on the same ide cable? IDE & cdrom? Is there a heat issue?

The instructions your computer is executing are not whet was written for it. What exactly crashes? Have you checked the md5 checksums of any large files?
Yes, it's even coughing up kernel errors when booting some live distros such as Parted Magic. Every time it's slightly different & the offending PID isn't always the same. Sometimes I can boot OK, even from cold start. Sometimes it doesn't work.

1) I am not overclocking, my CPU is at stock 2.83GHz & my RAM is actually underclocking at PC2-5300 instead of PC2-6400.

2) I don't think it's disk corruption because I've run updated versions of Western Digital Data Life Guard multiple times with no errors. One of my drives is very new (<1 yr old) too. I have replaced both SATA cords as well. I am not running any IDE devices, only SATA.

3) Heat is my biggest suspicion at this point. As mentioned before I put an aftermarket Thermaltake cooler on my northbridge, but my ICH7R southbridge remains cooled with its rather puny stock aluminum heatsink, and it gets too hot to touch after a few minutes of idling. I am leary of investing any more into this board because it is already so old. Even though it was recently replaced via Asus RMA, should I try a new mobo? Even though my CPU & RAM is technically supported by my board, they definitely push it to its limits.

4) Various programs crash. I've had the unit hard lock when building ffmpeg (running make), running aptitude (or dpkg), and a dozen other random processes. I've reinstalled Debian from the official Lenny DVD many times (more than 5). I had the same problem in Ubuntu 9.04.

5) I'm not sure what you mean by checking the md5sums of large files. What constitutes a "large" file, and why would checking the md5sum help solve this problem?

I can't afford to just replace the whole rig, but I don't want to run the risk of introducing these errors to a new build. I was thinking about buying a new CPU/RAM/Mobo and keeping my chassis & disks, or maybe for the sake of saving money just replace the mobo, since my CPU and RAM have stress tested OK. What would you do?
 
Old 06-30-2010, 04:38 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ternarybit View Post
3) Heat is my biggest suspicion at this point. As mentioned before I put an aftermarket Thermaltake cooler on my northbridge, but my ICH7R southbridge remains cooled with its rather puny stock aluminum heatsink, and it gets too hot to touch after a few minutes of idling. I am leary of investing any more into this board because it is already so old. Even though it was recently replaced via Asus RMA, should I try a new mobo? Even though my CPU & RAM is technically supported by my board, they definitely push it to its limits.
Try the simple expedient of leaving the side off the box.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ternarybit View Post
4) Various programs crash. I've had the unit hard lock when building ffmpeg (running make), running aptitude (or dpkg), and a dozen other random processes. I've reinstalled Debian from the official Lenny DVD many times (more than 5). I had the same problem in Ubuntu 9.04.
Now this sounds like memory errors. If a build crashes, and you can simply hit up arrow and return, and it completes, you are down to memory or bus behaviour. How is your power supply? do you get readings in the bios? If your 5V is below 5V and your 3.3V is below 3.3, you can be sure they are well down by the time they get in on the m/b tracks. This is my guess. Nothing else makes sense.
 
Old 07-01-2010, 02:45 PM   #8
ternarybit
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Originally Posted by business_kid View Post
Try the simple expedient of leaving the side off the box.



Now this sounds like memory errors. If a build crashes, and you can simply hit up arrow and return, and it completes, you are down to memory or bus behaviour. How is your power supply? do you get readings in the bios? If your 5V is below 5V and your 3.3V is below 3.3, you can be sure they are well down by the time they get in on the m/b tracks. This is my guess. Nothing else makes sense.
I have left the side panel off and that doesn't change anything. My suspicion aside from that is PSU. I work at a computer repair shop; maybe I'll just bring it in and try a store-use 750W PSU and see if that changes anything. Thanks again for your help; I'll post what I find (if anything). Cheers!
 
Old 07-01-2010, 09:56 PM   #9
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ternarybit View Post
I work at a computer repair shop; maybe I'll just bring it in and try a store-use 750W PSU and see if that changes anything.
Then you may be in a position to use the best hardware troubleshooting technique of all -- changing parts for "known good" equivalents until the problem goes away and then restoring parts until the problem comes back (bearing in mind the possibility that the problem may be caused by interaction of parts rather than a single part).

A recent netsearch for software to analyse PC hardware faults revealed than even the best software was not fully reliable and experienced hardware technicians had learned that "known good part swapping" was the most reliable tool. IIRC the OP in that thread eventually solved the problem by replacing memory although memtest86+ had reported no errors.

One other technique you might try is to minimise the system down to mobo, PSU, keyboard, mouse, HDD, graphics adapter (if not onboard) and screen. That's right -- not even any case; rest the mobo on an anti-static mat. If testing by booting from Live CD/DVD (good idea, to maximise likelihood of uncorrupted software being loaded) then you need a CD/DVD drive too. Booting from USB preferable to mimimise necessary hardware.
 
Old 07-02-2010, 07:06 PM   #10
ternarybit
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
Then you may be in a position to use the best hardware troubleshooting technique of all -- changing parts for "known good" equivalents until the problem goes away and then restoring parts until the problem comes back (bearing in mind the possibility that the problem may be caused by interaction of parts rather than a single part).

A recent netsearch for software to analyse PC hardware faults revealed than even the best software was not fully reliable and experienced hardware technicians had learned that "known good part swapping" was the most reliable tool. IIRC the OP in that thread eventually solved the problem by replacing memory although memtest86+ had reported no errors.

One other technique you might try is to minimise the system down to mobo, PSU, keyboard, mouse, HDD, graphics adapter (if not onboard) and screen. That's right -- not even any case; rest the mobo on an anti-static mat. If testing by booting from Live CD/DVD (good idea, to maximise likelihood of uncorrupted software being loaded) then you need a CD/DVD drive too. Booting from USB preferable to mimimise necessary hardware.
Thanks, catkin, that's exactly what I had to do. I spent about 4 hours today methodically taking every part out of my system and replacing it with known-good components. First my video card, then PSU, then yanked the HDDs, then the RAM (even though it tested good), then ran memtest on THAT RAM, and STILL would get paging errors from the kernel on CPU core 0 or 1 when booting Parted Magic from UBCD5.1.

I had *every single* part replaced or disabled until I finally tried the CPU and...

it worked. Booted 5x into Parted Magic without a hitch. Haven't tried installing debian again yet but I won't even bother until I get an RMA replacement.

I now have an authorized RMA from Intel after no less than 40 hours of troubleshooting and 10+ failed OS installs. Yeesh!

Thanks for your help, all of you! Cheers.

-Austin
 
Old 07-03-2010, 12:34 AM   #11
catkin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ternarybit View Post
I had *every single* part replaced or disabled until I finally tried the CPU and...
Sodd's Law it was the last part, eh?

Glad you have identified it -- hardware problems can be so hard to resolve. Fortunately yours was not very intermittent and you had a supply of known-goods to substitute.
 
Old 07-03-2010, 04:57 PM   #12
ternarybit
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Originally Posted by catkin View Post
Sodd's Law it was the last part, eh?

Glad you have identified it -- hardware problems can be so hard to resolve. Fortunately yours was not very intermittent and you had a supply of known-goods to substitute.
Yeah, what a frustrating scenario. I suppose this is to balance out the 9+ years I've enjoyed without a single hint of computer problems.

Thank God for so many Linux live distros, because that's the only way I could consistently reproduce the problem. In fact the only one that did that was Parted Magic loaded from UBCD; KNOPPIX & Kubuntu live booted fine several times on the bad CPU! Otherwise I would have had to go through the usual install Debian, wait 3-6 weeks for the kernel crash, try another fix, reinstall again, ad infinitum.

The upside is that the CPU is fairly new and replaceable under warranty. For the record, Intel is very helpful and quick to approve legit RMA requests. I used "live chat" and it got approved within 15 minutes.

Cheers and thanks again! Linux FTW
 
  


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