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Old 11-08-2009, 03:34 AM   #16
WhisperiN
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Great to find the topic taking deep discussion where the information grow more and more..


Alright, here we come to something else..
  • I did really create my own designated directory, called it:
    /mybin
  • I moved my own-made-scripts into it, from the previous directory /bin
  • I updated my $PATH to include the new directory (I prefer to call the script by its name only rather than the full bath.. time saving..!!)
  • It worked, and I was able to call it by the name.. so I thought it worked.

Well, I found a problem..
I have into my cron jobs this for example:

Code:
30 * * * * some-script
That some-script was in /bin and the cron job was succeeding to find it.
Now, after I put it into the new directory.. I get this error:
Code:
/bin/sh: some-script: command not found
Even-though, I can call it directly from the command line like:
Code:
~# some-script
Is there something more that I'll have to do to have the Crond able to find it?


Regards..
 
Old 11-08-2009, 03:52 AM   #17
catkin
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Location: Tamil Nadu, India
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhisperiN View Post
Is there something more that I'll have to do to have the Crond able to find it?
cron does not have the usual path. If you change the crontab entry to use the full path it will run. If you want to see what $PATH crontab uses add echo $PATH > some_file at the beginning of the script. If your script relies on $PATH then you may want to set $PATH in the script itself.
 
Old 11-08-2009, 04:50 AM   #18
pcunix
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And (as I said before) you SHOULD use the full path in cron or anything else that calls it.

It's fine to have this in your PATH for your convenience at the command line. In cron and scripts, it's smarter to call it explicitly so that when you or someone else looks at this five years from now, there's no struggle to find out what your command actually does.
 
Old 11-08-2009, 05:35 AM   #19
WhisperiN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catkin View Post
cron does not have the usual path. If you change the crontab entry to use the full path it will run. If you want to see what $PATH crontab uses add echo $PATH > some_file at the beginning of the script. If your script relies on $PATH then you may want to set $PATH in the script itself.
Thank buddy for the addition..

Now I see ;-)



Quote:
Originally Posted by pcunix View Post
And (as I said before) you SHOULD use the full path in cron or anything else that calls it.

It's fine to have this in your PATH for your convenience at the command line. In cron and scripts, it's smarter to call it explicitly so that when you or someone else looks at this five years from now, there's no struggle to find out what your command actually does.

I believe your are totally right..
There is no big deal in adding the full path to the cronjob line since it's a one-time entry..

Thanks for you all who shared the giving..

Much Regards, and see you into another discussion..

(Here if you have a clue..
Very Secure FTP (vsftpd) refuse to start on Slackware Current)
 
Old 11-08-2009, 07:50 AM   #20
frenchn00b
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Registered: Jun 2007
Location: E.U., Mountains :-)
Distribution: Debian, Etch, the greatest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tredegar View Post
sbin is usually for commands that must be run as root, the superuser
/usr/local/bin is a good place for your personal commands / scripts
what about placing them under debian under
/usr/bin
then chmod +x them

or why not to leave them into /usr/share... ?

or eventually under

$HOME/scripts ?
 
  


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