LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Security
User Name
Password
Linux - Security This forum is for all security related questions.
Questions, tips, system compromises, firewalls, etc. are all included here.

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 04-27-2002, 06:50 PM   #1
Scorcher2005
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: MD 8.2
Posts: 60

Rep: Reputation: 15
Question linux users question


In linux can you setup multiple accounts where 1 of which has all power(admin/manager)and can change anything he wants about the other accounts???
 
Old 04-27-2002, 06:58 PM   #2
acid_kewpie
Moderator
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: UK
Distribution: Gentoo, RHEL, Fedora, Centos
Posts: 43,417

Rep: Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977Reputation: 1977
you can add the user to the root group with something like

useradd admin -G root

which will add the user "admin" to the normal user group, but also to the root group.
 
Old 04-27-2002, 10:15 PM   #3
Norel
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: Italy
Distribution: RockLinux
Posts: 35

Rep: Reputation: 15
Re: linux users question

Quote:
Originally posted by Scorcher2005
In linux can you setup multiple accounts where 1 of which has all power(admin/manager)and can change anything he wants about the other accounts???
Just YES ... you don't need any extra setup

All power account name is "root" and is created during installation by quite ANY distro.

This is simply what you asked or I miss something?
 
Old 04-28-2002, 09:23 AM   #4
Scorcher2005
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: MD 8.2
Posts: 60

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
OK, i was reading the webpage "Things we widh we knew before starting" and it says the only time you use the root account is to change major sytem things because you may accidently crash your system. Can i make a new account with just that much "power" for myself so i dont screw up the computer? And can i make user accounts with their "power" limited?
 
Old 04-29-2002, 12:49 AM   #5
lnxconvrt
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2002
Location: Houston
Distribution: FC3, Manrake 10.x, various others at times
Posts: 113

Rep: Reputation: 18
su root

Regular user accounts will be created with limited powers. Type "man useradd" if you want to know how to add users from the command line. Most distros will have a gui that you can use for this also.

The root account should already be created, as Norel said. Rarely, if ever, is there a need to logon as root. Create (if you don't already have one) a regular user account to use. If you need to do something as root, you can usually "su root" or "su -" from a terminal window (the latter gives you root's environment). Once done, just "exit" to go back to the original shell session as a regular user, with no root powers.

Does that help any?
 
Old 04-29-2002, 04:54 PM   #6
Scorcher2005
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: MD 8.2
Posts: 60

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
a bit confusing
 
Old 04-29-2002, 08:59 PM   #7
lnxconvrt
Member
 
Registered: Mar 2002
Location: Houston
Distribution: FC3, Manrake 10.x, various others at times
Posts: 113

Rep: Reputation: 18
trying again...

OK, when you install with SuSE, Red Hat and probably most other distributions you'll come to a screen where it says something like "type in the password for root". You do that twice, then it creates the root account for you.

That account has all power, can pretty much do anything, including deleting critical system files that would render your system unbootable. Therefore, when you log in, either at a text based console window, or at a prompt that takes you to a desktop like kde or gnome, it is not advisable to login as root.

For this reason, most distros will, after prompting for the root password, also ask if you want to create any regular user accounts. These will be ordinary accounts which do not have the power to screw up the system too badly. You should create one of these, using any username you like, if you did not already do so when you did the installation. Then, whenever you logon, logon with that username rather than with root as the username. If you do need to do something with root powers, such as software installation, you can open a terminal window and su as I mentioned.

If you haven't added a regular user, and have been typing "root" when prompted to logon, create a regular user with "useradd" and use this user when you logon. You can probably also create a user through a menu, depending on your distro.

If this doesn't clarify, maybe you can describe what your distro is, how you logon and with what user account, and what you still have questions about.
 
Old 04-30-2002, 07:19 AM   #8
Scorcher2005
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Distribution: MD 8.2
Posts: 60

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
ok
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How to setup FTP users only users on LInux Fedora Soujiro Linux - Newbie 8 09-13-2010 08:34 AM
Question for Unstable Users... japetto Debian 6 09-15-2005 07:15 PM
cxoffice users question d1l2w3 Linux - Software 0 05-22-2004 05:55 PM
New to linux.. question about "users" Sabastian Linux - Software 2 06-20-2003 09:36 AM
Question about switching to Linux with Multiple Users Whitehat Linux - General 7 04-25-2003 01:27 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Security

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:11 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration