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Old 07-02-2006, 11:25 PM   #1
teluguswan
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(Linux Admin - Want to know how to change the normal user to Administrator )


Hai


. I want to know the user rights - Normal User, Administrator
(user the ability to carry out certain functions on the system?).
. How to change a Normal User to Administrator
. List of users available on the System



waiting for the solutions, thank u all for sharing your knowledge with us.

Turning into Six the linuxquestions.org is not only a good thing but also it made lot of people to come together and to change this world into the world of opensource and linux.

Thank u all


The Command mode helps me very much instead of going into user and groups gui and tick on the appropriate.

Last edited by teluguswan; 07-03-2006 at 09:35 AM.
 
Old 07-02-2006, 11:33 PM   #2
nadroj
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Quote:
. I want to know the user rights - Normal User, Administrator.
besides root, normal users (ie non root users) dont really have a set of rights.. they are allocated a set of priveledges for every file. you could also see what priveledged commands they could run, as layed out in the /etc/sudoers file. on the other hand, root can do anything anywhere, as you probably know.

Quote:
. How to change a Normal User to Administrator
generally its not a good idea to give a normal user root priveledges... thats what the root account is for, and only the root account. i think iv read on here that you can make a non root user to have root priveledges though.

Quote:
. List of users available on the System
probably check the /etc/passwd file

Last edited by nadroj; 07-02-2006 at 11:36 PM.
 
Old 07-02-2006, 11:38 PM   #3
musicman_ace
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Listing all the users
cat /etc/passwd

Changing Normal User to "Administator"
you could either allow that user to sudo assuming you have sudo installed, or add him to the root group, useradd -G root username. In that command, the word 'root' is the group's name and you have to substitute your user account for the word 'username'. I'd recommend the sudo idea as I've never given anyone access to the root group

User access rights?
Are you talking file permissions or giving a user the ability to carry out certain functions on the system?

-- Edit--
You beat me to it

Last edited by musicman_ace; 07-02-2006 at 11:40 PM.
 
Old 07-02-2006, 11:50 PM   #4
prozac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teluguswan
How to change a Normal User to Administrator
The concept of Administrator, Power User and Normal Users etc are not in Linux. Linux is made up of files and the User Power is explained from what amount of system files the user controls. Normally, you have a root user, who is the supreme being of your Linux machine and has all the power. everybody else is a regular user. Now this is enough for most of the cases but yes there are and always will be exceptions. That's what for the sudo was created. The sudo and the file sudoers let you add regular users to execute some files that they normally can not or should not. for example only root can execute the 'useradd' script but if you add a regular user in the sudoers file and give him the permissions for the 'useradd' script, that regular user can now create users as root will. basically, this user will execute the 'useradd' script with root privileges but without needing the root password or login in as root. However this is not a safe practice. The user 'root' must and should handle all administrative tasks.
 
Old 07-03-2006, 12:27 AM   #5
Capt_Caveman
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Moved: This thread is more suitable in the Linux - Security forum and has been moved accordingly to help your thread/question get the exposure it deserves.
 
Old 07-03-2006, 09:40 AM   #6
teluguswan
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Thanks for the solutions it helped me very much to make some of our users to do the root functions.

But i have a doubt, that how to know what users are having the previleges of root (if i forgot)
 
Old 07-03-2006, 10:08 AM   #7
prozac
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teluguswan
Thanks for the solutions it helped me very much to make some of our users to do the root functions.

But i have a doubt, that how to know what users are having the previleges of root (if i forgot)
how are you distributing root privileges? through the passwd file method or through the sudoers file? you can check the /etc/passwd file to see who has root groups or the sudoers file to check who are in the list.
 
Old 07-04-2006, 07:07 AM   #8
teluguswan
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I want to give rights to one user to shutdown the system, and to run some of the root utilities . Because of this i need the info and iam not using the sudo

i dont understand the /etc/passwd just ..............

thank u all for the support

Last edited by teluguswan; 07-05-2006 at 08:34 AM.
 
Old 07-04-2006, 09:20 AM   #9
unSpawn
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iam not using the sudoers

I want to make sure you understand that, as others said before, you should be using Sudo and nothing else. If you can't make things work with sudo please post detailed information so we can help you. Only add users to wheel or root group if you have exhausted all options sudo (maybe in combination with wrapperscripts) gives you. If you remain adamant you should go down the wheel/root group path you haven't explored Sudo options to its fullest or even could be in the wrong line of work. Anyway. That path leads to anger and hate, and we all know what hate leads to*.



* Meaning a chronic case of bad temper, asthma, wearing black all year round and a hostile workplace with lots of "incidents". If you think this sounds cool you're forgetting it will cost you a limb, the oneliners you use won't make for good pickup lines and the only way to switch emperors is to die.

Last edited by unSpawn; 07-04-2006 at 09:36 AM.
 
Old 07-05-2006, 08:38 AM   #10
teluguswan
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Hey

The thing is like this that i want to know how the normal user can work as root user.

i want to know these solutions in Command line mode not gui.

i.e the reason iam more specific to this thank u
 
Old 07-05-2006, 11:40 AM   #11
unSpawn
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The thing is like this that i want to know how the normal user can work as root user.
He can not, he should not and he must not. I thought we'd made that clear.
We are here to help, so if you don't understand any of this just say so.


i.e the reason iam more specific to this thank u
No you're not. In the last post you where *more* specific saying: "one user to shutdown the system, and to run some of the root utilities". So please post which user should be allowed to run what commands (+arguments) and we'll whip up some examples, OK?
 
Old 07-05-2006, 11:44 AM   #12
nadroj
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having your 'normal user' working as root for long periods of time, and in GUI mode possibly, is a huge security risk.
the first question is why do you NEED this? root is for system administration ONLY. all other times (listening to music, web surfing, writing documents, etc) is to be done from the safety and the lack of permission of the normal user.
 
Old 07-05-2006, 11:55 PM   #13
teluguswan
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Yes I will give u the reason why iam more specific to this.

We have large network of Linux systems and servers starting from morning 8:00am to 9:00pm Iam coming in the morning at 8:00am but i have to leave some days on 6:00 pm so i want to give one user who is trusted to me this shutdown option for that i dont want to give our root user to him. To stop the Service squid after the 6:00 for our official restrictions.

thank u all, and at the same time i hate the GUI mode where just we have to click next and when the problems comes we dont find any proper error messages. When we are using the command mode atleast we can know the internal process and the solution can get when the error message.
 
Old 07-05-2006, 11:58 PM   #14
nadroj
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so your going to use sudo, and edit the /etc/sudoers file to allow this person to issue the specific commands? if so then, as mentioned, thats the best and proper way to do it.
 
Old 07-06-2006, 12:08 AM   #15
prozac
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'visudo' is the way to go for such situations.
 
  


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