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Old 03-15-2005, 11:14 AM   #16
TigerOC
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Who wants Nero anyway? I went there too, to find out and my last nero version was 5 from 2 years ago. I have 3 Linux gui burning tools which i never use anyway. Why? they are just too cumbersome and slow. Use the cli its quicker and easier which is one of the reasons I love my Linux system.
 
Old 03-15-2005, 11:23 AM   #17
dukeinlondon
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Yeah, I do that too for some things actually. But I was curious about the DVD burning capacities...

Last edited by dukeinlondon; 03-15-2005 at 11:24 AM.
 
Old 03-16-2005, 09:55 AM   #18
lagartoflojo
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Quote:
Originally posted by ernesto_cgf
I don't know exactly if this is the answer you are looking for, but it seems to me you are asking about what desktop API (or whatever is that you call it) they are using. It that is the case, it uses some not-so-updated version of GTK, I think. Perhaps he screenshots are themed too. Who knows?
Well, it looks a lot like acroread 5.x to me (which is Motif if I'm not mistaken). In any case, it is ugly. K3B is a lot more pleasant to look at, and it's OSS, so I'm sticking to it.
--L*F
 
Old 03-16-2005, 10:31 AM   #19
KimVette
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Quote:
Originally posted by TigerOC
Who wants Nero anyway?
On Windows, Nero offers a very, very nice complete DVD authoring suite, and K3b still only begins to scrape the functionality of the Nero suite.
 
Old 03-17-2005, 01:39 AM   #20
corbis_demon
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Quote:
Who wants Nero anyway?
Absolutely. I don't understand why people so insist on pretty multicolored interfaces for their apps. Does it add to the productivity, perhaps? They are just front-ends to the same old command-line tools, like cdrtools, growisofs and dvd-rw tools. TkDVD is a pretty good option for those so in love with point-and-click features.

Quote:
On Windows, Nero offers a very, very nice complete DVD authoring suite,
( What times are we coming to? A DVD authoring suite!)
I doubt whether the crossover version can perform stuff all that well. It's still dependent on many windows-specific API. Is there a legitimate reason why people should be enthused by this?
 
Old 03-17-2005, 01:49 AM   #21
bornhj
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Absolutely. I don't understand why people so insist on pretty multicolored interfaces for their apps. Does it add to the productivity, perhaps? They are just front-ends to the same old command-line tools, like cdrtools, growisofs and dvd-rw tools. TkDVD is a pretty good option for those so in love with point-and-click features.

The pretty interface makes the overall user experience more enjoyable.. Face it, even if a lot of people here love the CLI, you can hardly say the majority of PC users worldwide prefer a CLI over a simple, colourful GUI.

Oh, and Nero obviously has finally realised that there is such a thing as a Linux user...


( What times are we coming to? A DVD authoring suite!)
I doubt whether the crossover version can perform stuff all that well. It's still dependent on many windows-specific API. Is there a legitimate reason why people should be enthused by this?


Agreed. Nero for Linux will never be as good as the Windows version (which I actually love - it's very powerful once you get over the original "SmartStart" junk) without a dedicated team of developers, or without letting out the current source onder GPL and letting the community develop it.


I applaud Nero's move, but they need to think it through just a bit more. I would have prefered no Nero for Linux over a half-assed attempt.
 
Old 03-17-2005, 04:00 AM   #22
corbis_demon
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Quote:
[B] The pretty interface makes the overall user experience more enjoyable.[b]
Sure it does, and X does a great job at that. But I still think the reason why most users prefer GUI's, is the fear of the Command Line. Most users see it as a tool from the medieval times and have a strong dislike for it.
The CLI is not just a play thing of the über-geek, but anybody wishing to get the best out of their system should use it. This is the beauty of the GNU/Linux system. Both X and the console coexist amicably and provide a more powerful system to work with. It's a point that many overlook, but actually is the key to GNU/Linux's success.
 
Old 03-17-2005, 04:09 AM   #23
dukeinlondon
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Using a GUI is easier on your memory. No command and switches to remember (most people are not keen on pesky details), just buttons which remind you of the available functions.

GUI also often embed logic, making it impossible to use incompatible or incoherent option combination (that's when it's properly done of course). When command line apps do the same, you have typed everything, commited and then you get an error message and it's back to the drawing board. When you add that most people do typos....

CLI is quicker, just like it's quicker to book a plane ticket with an attendant than doing it online on a site you've never used. To the difference than everyone knows how to speak but you have to learn the CLI.
 
Old 03-17-2005, 04:10 AM   #24
snecklifter
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Quote:
Originally posted by corbis_demon
But I still think the reason why most users prefer GUI's, is the fear of the Command Line.
Yeah but you try authoring a DVD from command line! At somepoint you gotta have a gooey...
 
Old 03-17-2005, 02:06 PM   #25
drowbot
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Quote:
...I still think the reason why most users prefer GUI's, is the fear of the Command Line. Most users see it as a tool from the medieval times and have a strong dislike for it.
That may be the case for a lot of people, I will agree with you on that point. But personally, I use both. For some things, the CLI is better. For others, the GUI can be quicker and more efficient. I have no fear of the CLI. I know how to use it and I do use it often. With Linux, it's all about choice and the best tool for the job.
 
Old 03-17-2005, 06:06 PM   #26
KimVette
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Quote:
Originally posted by bornhj
Absolutely. I don't understand why people so insist on pretty multicolored interfaces for their apps. Does it add to the productivity, perhaps? They are just front-ends to the same old command-line tools, like cdrtools, growisofs and dvd-rw tools. TkDVD is a pretty good option for those so in love with point-and-click features.
Oh my god, try designing a DVD menu from the command line.
No, not just a simple 3x3 table. Check out any commercial DVD and look at the menu.

Now, design the images from the command line.
Arrange them in your menu from the command line. Be sure to get the gradient just right, and the graduated alpha blending where desired. From the command line.

Six months from now you'll still be trying to tweak your images to get them just right, and I'll have completed the DVD menu months earlier using either Photoshop or The Gimp and Nero (unfortunately, probably Nero on Windows) or Ulead DVD Workshop.

The same can be said for CAD, 3D rendering, nonlinear video editing, web development, web BROWSING (I suppose you prefer Lynx, right? Do you use Lynx to browse this site? Hey mods, please post bornhj "I hate GUI"'s user agent for all to mock^H^H^H^Hadmire the Mozilla or Firefox or possibly even MSIE user agent!), and so forth. Yeah, you can edit html using vi, pico, ed, etc. but isn't Quanta Plus so much nicer, and doesn't it save you s(bleep)loads of time?

There is a value to command line: that is, mainly automation of routine tasks and scheduling via crond, macros (more automation but generally tied to a button), nightly builds (yes, more automation!), and the like. Need to get actual work done - quickly? That is what the GUI is for. Not all tasks are sysadmin-oriented.

Last edited by KimVette; 03-17-2005 at 06:23 PM.
 
Old 03-19-2005, 09:25 AM   #27
corbis_demon
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Can't you even see right? Crediting my post to bornhj!

Quote:
Originally posted by KimVette

Oh my god, try designing a DVD menu from the command line.
Why the hell should I? I don't need to.

Quote:

The same can be said for CAD, 3D rendering, nonlinear video editing
Actually, I use a CAD-CAM machine to plot machine designs, with dedicated programs hardwired in the machine ( I'm an aerospace engineer) . And that, runs on a dedicated OS, not Linux, not Windows. Also 3d rendering, non-linear video editing and autoimated adaptive progressive rendering stuff I do on a Silicon Graphics machine.
All GNU tools work best from the command line.And these are the most important pieces of code on your system.So yeah, I don't trust them in the hands of a GUI. For sysadmin purposes, you gotta use the console.

Oh, and I'm such a hopeless moron that I can't understand why you need GUI for apps. Perhaps you didn't care to read my later posts. The linux system is based on text files. Why do you so jump out of your pants and wax eloquent about GUI's and MS Windows?
 
Old 03-19-2005, 11:37 AM   #28
snecklifter
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Quote:
Originally posted by corbis_demon
For sysadmin purposes, you gotta use the console.
Yes but dvd authoring isnt sysadmin work is it? No-one in their right mind would attempt to author a dvd using the command line - its going to be quicker using a gui any day, specifically because there are some proceses that require screen alignment and graphical placing of objects such as buttons etc. I'm not sure why this argument exists. No-one is trying to develop a dvd-authoring package that uses the command line. I would certainly love to see a nero equivalent on linux but it should be open source. Because ahead have failed to do this (and I'm sure licensing isnt the only reason behind it) I shall continue to use k3b to burn cds and dvds and reboot into windows to author dvds.
 
Old 03-21-2005, 05:50 PM   #29
TravisOSF
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not to mention burning a data cdof your favorite mp3s and choosing exactly what files are to be chosen is much more tedious on a commandline.

When I burn ISOs and folders of data, command line. If I am making an MP3 cd for my car--no way I'd ever use a CLI.
 
Old 03-22-2005, 11:56 AM   #30
ben_build#2.1.0
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Quote:
I wouldn't be surprised if we see Macromedia or Adobe products for Linux sometime in the future.
1. There already is a macromedia flash player for linux

2. Why would adobe need to create something like adobe acrobat reader professional for linux? You can already create pdf files using OpenOffice.org. Would OO.org then have to pay royalties (or something similar) to adobe? Since there already is at least 3 linux programs that read and edit pdf files, I don't see why we need an adobe acrobat version.
 
  


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