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Old 02-16-2015, 10:25 PM   #16
venicesmith001
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hope this command will helps me properly while i will try to do it on my linux
 
Old 02-17-2015, 01:06 AM   #17
bucove
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I think it is a wonderfully powerful statement of a healthy open source community when we have a three way tie for first place. I would not change it for anything. It proves we have a stable functioning and cooperative chaotic system of prefectly functioning checks and balances. We the open source community are a healthy ecosystem. Long live LINUX!!
 
Old 02-18-2015, 03:14 PM   #18
Myk267
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Hedger View Post
Lowest common denominator, anyone can cobble together a few lines of pyhton code and think they are a programmet, c,c++ etc takes real skill.

Let the flame war commence!
Real programmers program in languages which are really hard to program in!
 
Old 02-18-2015, 03:31 PM   #19
Keith Hedger
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Originally Posted by Myk267 View Post
Real programmers program in languages which are really hard to program in!
I learnt back in the late 70's programming in HEX, on hex keypad and 7 segment L.E.D. display, guess that makes me like macho programmer
 
Old 02-18-2015, 04:16 PM   #20
bucove
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I wrote in Cobol, Fortran, Pascal. Modulus was all the rage when I started working professionally. We all soon switched to C and then C++... But the most arcane work I ever did was an executive hardware interrupt handler for the Amiga's serial port to pay a little more attention to MIDI sample dump data streams since the multitasking system was set up by Commodore to place a somewhat lower priority than needed on the serial port. I wrote the entire thing in MC68XXX Assembly language. It was fast. Very fast. not a blip on the 7.8mHz CPU and solid data every time. Commodore was negotiating it's purchase from me when they went under.
 
Old 02-18-2015, 04:31 PM   #21
Keith Hedger
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Used COBOL for a while with punch cards! PIC that for a game of soldiers!
 
Old 02-19-2015, 03:20 PM   #22
tuxon86
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God... I started my linux odyssey in 1993 with Slackware... I feel old...
 
Old 02-19-2015, 04:53 PM   #23
Keith Hedger
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God... I started my linux odyssey in 1993 with Slackware... I feel old...
Nowt but a lad!
 
Old 04-16-2015, 05:04 PM   #24
curtvaughan
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Talking Ha. Ancient stuff.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith Hedger View Post
Used COBOL for a while with punch cards! PIC that for a game of soldiers!
Yeah, when I got my first data processing job in 1974 at the University of Texas at Austin, there was an accounting machine, a card sorter, and a remote job entry (RJE) station with a line printer and card reader which were controlled by a PDP-12. Once booted up, the RJE communicated via coaxial cable with the CDC 6400/6600 academic mainframe. Occasionally, if the front panel switch boot which activated the initial bootstrap of the card reader didn't work, there was a paper tape backup reel which could boot up the reader and the printer via the PDP-12. There were also three full time key punchers in our area. They were gone a year later, consigned to dead job history. Fortran was the language of choice at that time, along with Compass CDC assembly code. Memories
 
Old 06-09-2015, 09:04 PM   #25
Bruce from Canada
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More ancient, but has its value today!

Quote:
Originally Posted by curtvaughan View Post
Yeah, when I got my first data processing job in 1974 at the University of Texas at Austin, there was an accounting machine, a card sorter, and a remote job entry (RJE) station with a line printer and card reader which were controlled by a PDP-12. Once booted up, the RJE communicated via coaxial cable with the CDC 6400/6600 academic mainframe. Occasionally, if the front panel switch boot which activated the initial bootstrap of the card reader didn't work, there was a paper tape backup reel which could boot up the reader and the printer via the PDP-12. There were also three full time key punchers in our area. They were gone a year later, consigned to dead job history. Fortran was the language of choice at that time, along with Compass CDC assembly code. Memories

When I started my career, there were no real computers! This was 1967 in Montreal. I was trained as an electronic technician. the only computer i had heard of at that time was an experimental one in MIT which ran on vacuum tubes!

It reportedly had 50,000 of them. but since the MTBF of even the industrial premium vacuum tubes of the time was only 50,000 hours, it would infer that the MTBF of this machine was only 1 hour!

BTW at the time the cost of one of those tubes was 3 to 4 times that of its consumer counterpart!

So, it was only some time later when making computers for real use became practical.

After all, for such applications, germanium point contact transistors really were not going to cut the mustard!

Today, at the age of 70, and retired, I have self-taught myself much of what I know in many subjects, and still do the hands on, right down to the basic metal at times.

This is very handy, because as an avid DIY, I can design and build many items for myself at a fraction of the cost, and save a lot of money.

"A penny saved is a penny earned!"

Also, before doing anything, the design strategy is very well thought out, backed by about 50 years of following the market. Two of my first design criteria a re versatility and repairability, so everything is modular from the ground up.

Nobody can predict the future, and our needs all change ongoing, hence the versatility is worth some extra effort.

However more often than not such versatility is either overpriced, excessively inconvenient to obtain or simply not forthcoming from the market.

Very often I will reject the purchase of even a very low cost item on the basis that theinconvenience, whether in the product, the packaging or the shopping any or all, outweighs the sale price. this I am likely to see of any item before even getting on the web or going to a store, but when I do thise, I spend the extra time to update my market familiarity not only on what IS there, but also the trends of what is NOT there.

That is one tough smart shopper.

When I visit one of the local electgronic stores, where it is reasonably likely that there will be other technically versed clients, and they learn who I am, they may remark,, albeit with respect "You were trained by the old school!"

Obviously they know what they are not being taught in "The new school!"

Oters, being more interested in looking at how they can make a quick buck with someone, will have a more negative reaction for reasons reasonably obvious to those who choose to realize!
 
Old 06-09-2015, 11:15 PM   #26
curtvaughan
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Thumbs up Old timers

Well, Bruce from Canada, the numbers add up. I'm 63. Cheers and keep discovering
 
Old 06-16-2015, 02:58 PM   #27
Eric Elliott
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My first computer, 1962?

Per Wikipedia, "UNIVAC I, as the first successful civilian computer, was a key part of the dawn of the computer age. Despite early delays, the UNIVAC program at the Census Bureau was a great success. The Bureau purchased a second UNIVAC I machine in the mid-1950's, and two UNIVAC 1105 [JPG] computers for the 1960 census." It was basically an improved Eniac.
My uncle took me into the Census Bureau to see it about 1962. I was amazed & about 11 years of age. Uncle claimed programming was done by moving jumpers on a pin array, probably 250 X 250 pins & showed me by moving a few jumpers while it was operating.
That one visit to a Univac may have been what sent me into electronics & technology in general.

Sometimes I wonder if any Cromencos or Altairs are still in use. I know Amigas are still running software written 30 years ago.
 
Old 07-24-2015, 10:26 PM   #28
kwill
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The first computers I saw were at UK army pay corp depot near Winchester. IIRC TWO English Electric Leo's(?) which were valved (tubes) machines. They also had a unit the size of a big suitcase that used TRANSISTORS!. Apparently it was faster than both the Leo's. The wall had lots of tape units. That was 1962 or 63 and I was supposedly too young to go in with the tech college group I was with.
 
Old 07-28-2015, 02:52 AM   #29
rhubarbdog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UART View Post
I was just thinking the same thing. Python too. How'd it beat C?
It totally makes sense. Except when kernel and compiler writing the inherent dangers of poor memory access and management allowable in C make any performance benefits not worth while for a normal load on a modern machine.
The fact that a python program will run on any python capable machine without modification is a huge plus. The nice stuff that mops up after all but the best and most precise programmers is a huge benefit to both developer and user regardless of the inevitable runtime overhead.
 
Old 07-30-2015, 01:10 PM   #30
dugan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UART View Post
I was just thinking the same thing. Python too. How'd it beat C?
https://twitter.com/jkru/status/619516199567667204
 
  


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