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-   -   yum-updatesd, lot of memory and can it be scheduled? (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/yum-updatesd-lot-of-memory-and-can-it-be-scheduled-703409/)

kevinyeandel 02-09-2009 03:08 PM

yum-updatesd, lot of memory and can it be scheduled?
 
Hi

Using top and sorting by memory I see
PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND
2309 root 15 0 265m 41m 2060 S 0.0 8.3 22:18.33 yum-updatesd
15548 mysql 15 0 187m 24m 3844 S 0.0 4.9 1:51.76 mysqld
12752 root 18 0 262m 15m 8268 S 0.0 3.1 0:00.53 httpd
...


yum-updatesd seems to be hogging - 8.3% of 512MB, basically its forcing my system to dip into swap and I'm trying to keep a close eye on memory usage.

Is it necessary to have the daemon running 24/7 or could I have it up only at 3am to 5am for example?

Many thanks

Kevin

Maligree 02-09-2009 03:46 PM

If you're worried about that 8%, why not just disable that service and run a yum update when you feel like it? You could schedule that to run every 3 AM or so, just don't forget to add the -y flag so it doesn't require any input from your side.

kevinyeandel 02-09-2009 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maligree (Post 3437540)
If you're worried about that 8%, why not just disable that service and run a yum update when you feel like it?

Reasons to do with security. I am led to believe it is necessary to keep a system up-to-date. This server is on the web.

But, though, implicit from what you say, It isn't wrong to disable it, I could compromise and cron updates every couple of days and manually if something critical is required....

Maligree 02-09-2009 04:05 PM

Is it taking up that 8% all the time? I don't use it myself, but I'd expect it to be nearly unnoticeable when it's not doing its work: checking for updates. And the default setting is check every hour.

lazlow 02-09-2009 07:16 PM

In the long run you are probably better off manually running yum update. Many of the security updates will depend on kernel changes. Even if updatesd automatically updates the kernel, it will not use that kernel until a reboot occurs. Another issue with updatesd is you can miss a lot of errors yum throws if you are not watching it. Just schedule a little bit of time each week to run the update.


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