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-   -   XP era computers (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/xp-era-computers-4175563383/)

NGIB 01-08-2016 02:59 AM

XP era computers
 
I've helped a few folks here so this is just a synopsis of the advice I've given.

It may still be in good shape but since XP is gone (for the most part), if you want to keep using it you'll need to switch to Linux. Which version will be the key. Mint is currently the "darling" of the Linux world and while it's a fine distro it does not focus on older, slower hardware. I see threads on all the Linux forums about failures installing Mint on old hardware. Even if it installs, if it's the Cinnamon version it will likely be very slow and have issues as Cinnamon is very resource intensive.

Another issue to consider is the graphics system. Many older graphics chipsets are not supported by drivers very well (or at all) anymore. AMD in fact quit supporting their older systems completely a few years ago. If this is the case, you'll have to use the open source driver. Don't expect blazing performance and you'll not be disappointed. I run the open source drive on my AMD system and it works fine; however, I don't do a lot of graphics intensive stuff.

Next, you're system may be 32 bit only so if you try to install a 64 bit distro - it won't work. Also, it may not support PAE either (lets 32 bit systems see more RAM). If this is the case you'll need a non-PAE kernel and many distros no longer offer this. Most machines built in the last 10-12 years are 64 bit, older than that they're likely 32 bit.

WiFi is also a source of frowns, especially with Broadcom based WiFi. Broadcom was/is VERY popular with hardware makers and many older systems have these chipsets. You can get them working but it requires tinkering and manually installing drivers. Some distros support Broadcom OOTB.

Finally, while Linux is efficient and has less overhead than Windows, it will not turn your old PC into a speed demon or gaming rig. Keep realistic expectations.

If you're going to make the jump with an older computer I seriously recommend the MX-15 distro. One of the main developers is also the guy behind antiX - which is HIGHLY regarded as the goto distro for old hardware. It has Broadcom support built-in, it has 32 bit and 64 bit versions, the 32 bit version comes with PAE and non-PAE kernels, and it has a great forum for support. This is a HUGE factor as some tweaks are generally necessary on old hardware and the folks behind MX-15 are very well versed in this area.

I'm not affiliated in any way with MX-15 other than being a fan. I just get tired or reading about the trials and tribulations folks are experiencing trying to get the "cadillac" distros running on old hardware...

http://www.mepiscommunity.org/mx

beachboy2 01-08-2016 03:14 AM

NGIB,

I fully endorse your sentiments.

ardvark71 01-08-2016 03:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beachboy2 (Post 5474890)
There is no "Did you find this post helpful?" tag being shown on the original post at the moment.

Hi...

You can click on the "snowflake" next to the penguin on the bottom left. It will accomplish the same thing. :)

Regards...

fogpipe 01-08-2016 05:00 AM

Slackware and Mate run just fine on my 2005 vintage Pentium D system. Of the "fast light good on older computers" distros that i have tried, i didnt really see that much difference in speed, so you might as well install slackware and get all the options.
Re graphics, for around 40$ or so you can pick up an NVIDIA card on amazon even an agp card if the computer is that old.
As far as speed and resource usage goes, i agree that staying away from cinnamon, kde and gnome 3 is a good idea, luckily that still leaves lots of options.
One of the keys to making an older computer seem zippy is adding more ram, as much as the box will handle and a minimum of around 3-4 gigs.
The interfaces you would likely be using on an older computer (xfce, fluxbox) arent any more (or not much more) processor intensive than a decade ago, but applications, especially browsers, seem to use a lot more ram these days than they used to.
Another note about graphics, an add in graphics card is a near essential, get one with as much ram as you can buy, with at least half a gig of ram, if you are going to be playing video or any games at all.
Also, onboard sound on computers of that age just sucks, luckily enough pci sound cards last i checked were pretty cheap.

beachboy2 01-08-2016 06:17 AM

ardvark71,

Quote:

You can click on the "snowflake" next to the penguin on the bottom left. It will accomplish the same thing.
Yes, thank you, I did click on the snowflake and I left a comment.

Soadyheid 01-08-2016 08:12 AM

@beachboy2

Quote:

It is only a minor point but does anybody have an explanation why this has happened?
Post #1 is usually a question so it's the answer(s) which will have the "Did you find this post helpful"
Post #2 appears to have the message on my display. Weird! :scratch:

BTW, the "snowflake" looks like it's actually a pair of scales, like the scales of justice, good answer/bad answer.

Sorry, got a bit diverted from the main topic...

Play Bonny!

:hattip:

BW-userx 01-08-2016 08:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fogpipe (Post 5474927)
Slackware and Mate run just fine on my 2005 vintage Pentium D system. Of the "fast light good on older computers" distros that i have tried, i didnt really see that much difference in speed, so you might as well install slackware and get all the options.

Agree SlackWare Rocks. I just stopped using only because I enjoy one liner updates, and installs of apps from repo's ;)

beachboy2 01-08-2016 08:38 AM

Soadyheid,

I did not realise that I had included the original post as well!

I have amended my post #5 accordingly.

NGIB 01-08-2016 09:09 AM

I'm not sure Slackware is a viable option for folks that can't even install a Buntu spin without help. After installing a distro and getting some experience, a user can move on to whatever - as we all did. I just wanted to point noobs to something that will probably get them up and running with minimum pain...

John VV 01-08-2016 10:47 AM

on the 15 year old XP box( DELL bought in 2001 ) i run ScientificLinux6.7 .But do to the Nvidia Gforce2 card i have to downgrade Xorg to 1.13 that was in SL 6.3

or run RHEL/CentOS/SL 5.11

SL 6 still has a lot of support left

BW-userx 01-08-2016 11:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NGIB (Post 5475010)
I'm not sure Slackware is a viable option for folks that can't even install a Buntu spin without help. After installing a distro and getting some experience, a user can move on to whatever - as we all did. I just wanted to point noobs to something that will probably get them up and running with minimum pain...

Linux for the i386 Happy :hattip: Times

slackwear is not that hard, if someone cannot read, and use a keyboard, then they just need to go play outside with the kitties.

ardvark71 01-08-2016 04:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Soadyheid (Post 5474993)
BTW, the "snowflake" looks like it's actually a pair of scales, like the scales of justice, good answer/bad answer.

Hi...

Now that I've taken a much closer look at it, yes it does. :D

Regards...

beachboy2 01-09-2016 12:42 AM

Code:

I'm not sure Slackware is a viable option for folks that can't even install a Buntu spin without help. After installing a distro and getting some experience, a user can move on to whatever - as we all did. I just wanted to point noobs to something that will probably get them up and running with minimum pain...
I fully agree.

The vast majority of total newcomers to Linux just want to get their "new", non-Microsoft Windows, computer up and running as quickly as possible, with controls that are easy to use, with minimal use of the command line.

Quote:

slackwear is not that hard, if someone cannot read, and use a keyboard, then they just need to go play outside with the kitties.
I see no sign of Slackware under "Beginner-Friendly Linux Distributions" in the sticky "Newbie alert: 50 Open Source Replacements for Windows XP":

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...xp-4175502495/

I wonder why not?

whm1974 01-09-2016 01:55 AM

I would say the XFCE is one of the better desktop environments for older computers.

BW-userx 01-09-2016 09:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beachboy2 (Post 5475392)
Code:

I'm not sure Slackware is a viable option for folks that can't even install a Buntu spin without help. After installing a distro and getting some experience, a user can move on to whatever - as we all did. I just wanted to point noobs to something that will probably get them up and running with minimum pain...
I fully agree.

The vast majority of total newcomers to Linux just want to get their "new", non-Microsoft Windows, computer up and running as quickly as possible, with controls that are easy to use, with minimal use of the command line.

they do not really want to run Linux, they're just Windows Users that want to brag that they run Linux to try and get all of the Nerdy girls .. LoL

Easy Install

Slackware

...
ps and it was a Slacker that wrote that listing you posted btw ...


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