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Old 07-11-2017, 04:16 PM   #16
RockDoctor
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I run Fedora Mate 32-bit on my old travel machine an Acer Aspire One ZG5 (1GB RAM, Atom N270). It's definitely not a speed demon. Works fine for spreadsheets, email, web browsing, and photo storage/viewing while on the road.
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 04:22 PM   #17
IsaacKuo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tofino_surfer View Post
Processor: Intel Celeron CPU E1200 @ 1.6GHz
Memory (RAM): 2.00 GB
System type: 32-bit Operating System
The line which says "32-bit Operating System" is irrelevant. This only says that the Windows Vista install is the 32-bit version. The system itself supports 64 bit (amd64 architecture) just fine.
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 04:35 PM   #18
KMCarpenter
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Maybe it was hard for me... you don't know me or anything about me... your post also didn't help me at all. However, thanks for your comment.



Quote:
Originally Posted by tofino_surfer View Post
There are only three lines of relevant text information in that crappy cellphone picture. You could have easily typed out those three lines instead of lazily providing a bad picture.

Let me do it for you.

Processor: Intel Celeron CPU E1200 @ 1.6GHz
Memory (RAM): 2.00 GB
System type: 32-bit Operating System


See that wasn't that hard and its not even my post.

If you want help from volunteers you need to put some effort into your posts. It is much easier for volunteers to read what I typed and what you definitely should have than to have to download a crappy picture and read from it.



If the machine fails tomorrow a modest new card could of course still be used in a future build. They aren't welding it into the old machine. It is a reusable component.

Also the rusty Pinto and new rims is a bad analogy as that would only be cosmetic. A new card would greatly improve the performance of an old machine.

There is one major advantage to having a separate card and that is the video RAM. Even a modest $60 NVidia GT 730 has 2 GB of video RAM, as much as the computer itself. With a slow processor and only 2GB RAM a card like this would allow video information (buffers) to be offloaded to the card as well as speeding up the graphics. There would be more of the 2GB RAM available for actually running programs.
 
Old 07-11-2017, 04:37 PM   #19
IsaacKuo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RockDoctor View Post
I run Fedora Mate 32-bit on my old travel machine an Acer Aspire One ZG5 (1GB RAM, Atom N270). It's definitely not a speed demon. Works fine for spreadsheets, email, web browsing, and photo storage/viewing while on the road.
Personally, I find web browsing on an Atom N270 to be an extremely unpleasant experience. I don't have first hand experience with the Celeron E1200 1.6Ghz, but I do have experience with older Core 2 Duo CPUs with similar performance:


(link to list of CPUs ranked by performance, Celeron E1200 highlighted)
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_look...00+%40+1.60GHz

Based on my experience with Core 2 Duo CPUs with similar performance, I'd find the web browsing experience with that CPU to be pleasant enough. Not the greatest, and I'd use Chromium with no flash installed.

(link to Atom N270 vs Celeron E1200)
http://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare....&cmp[]=673
 
Old 07-11-2017, 04:57 PM   #20
tofino_surfer
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Quote:
The line which says "32-bit Operating System" is irrelevant. This only says that the Windows Vista install is the 32-bit version. The system itself supports 64 bit (amd64 architecture) just fine.
I didn't realize that this is actually a 64-bit processor (just looked up the Celeron E1200 processor on Intel's site) but this makes my point even more valid. The OP could have typed out only two lines of relevant information in their original post instead of uploading a crappy blurry cellphone picture.

Quote:
The system itself supports 64 bit (amd64 architecture) just fine.
Why would an Intel chip support amd64 architecture? For Intel it would be x86_64.

Code:
 
 $ hwinfo --cpu
01: None 00.0: 10103 CPU                                        
  [Created at cpu.446]
  Unique ID: rdCR.j8NaKXDZtZ6
  Hardware Class: cpu
  Arch: X86-64
  Vendor: "GenuineIntel"
  Model: 6.42.7 "Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-2600K CPU @ 3.40GHz"   
....

$ uname -a
Linux server47.localdomain 3.10.0-514.2.2.el7.x86_64 #1 SMP Tue Dec 6 23:06:41 UTC 2016 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
 
Old 07-11-2017, 05:08 PM   #21
KMCarpenter
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Thanks for all the replies! After all the replies, I think I'm going to just install flavors until
I find one that works for me and ditch the dual monitor idea.
 
Old 07-11-2017, 05:22 PM   #22
IsaacKuo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tofino_surfer View Post
I didn't realize that this is actually a 64-bit processor (just looked up the Celeron E1200 processor on Intel's site) but this makes my point even more valid. The OP could have typed out only two lines of relevant information in their original post instead of uploading a crappy blurry cellphone picture.
Actually, there was another really useful piece of information there - the fact that the maker is eMachines is significant because it (unfortunately) says a lot about the quality of the computer's components. The truth is, not everybody is magically some expert in knowing exactly what information is relevant and what is definitely not useful.

Quote:
Why would an Intel chip support amd64 architecture? For Intel it would be x86_64.
Because Intel was economically forced to play catchup with the market leader in 64 bit processors. They struggled to gain traction with their own 64 bit CPUs while AMD's 64 bit CPUs caught on like wildfire. As such, Intel was essentially forced to make their next 64 bit CPUs compatible with amd64. The fact that their CPUs don't self report themselves as "amd64" is a matter of pride rather than technical differences. As far as running and installing software (including OS software), it's the same architecture.
 
Old 07-11-2017, 05:22 PM   #23
kilgoretrout
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Quote:
If the machine fails tomorrow a modest new card could of course still be used in a future build.
I see you've never serviced an emachines computer before. When that crappy psu that emachines typically uses blows, it will quite likely take out the motherboard, cpu and graphics card with it. Also, emachines usually put the lowest spec'ed psu that will run the build in their computers. The psu may not even be capable of supporting a graphics card. Did a little googling and found this discussion regarding attempting to upgrade the graphics card on an emachines W3653:

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/i...6013438AAhdJEx

Quoting from the above link:
Quote:
But, for your video card, yes you can get a 9800gtx. BUT, you need to upgrade your power supply. That video card will die in like 10 minutes of you pc being on, if you don't upgrade your power supply. I know this, because I have an emachines pc, with a worse video card then that, and it cant even handle that. Also, your computer has 2 pci-e slots on it.One is a PCI-E 1, and one is a PCI-E 16. YOU MUST PUT IT IN THE PCI-E 16 SLOT. By the way, what do you hate about ur Emachines? I hate everything about mine.
As far as the 64 bit compatibility goes, let me reiterate, the cpu is definitely 64 bit capable. However, the initial build was for a 32 bit OS. Under these circumstance, I've seen the motherboard bios locked to 32 bit OSes only. If you have trouble installing a 64 bit OS that's probably the reason why.
 
Old 07-11-2017, 07:12 PM   #24
tofino_surfer
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From IsaacKuo in post #6

Quote:
As for getting a video card - just get something cheap and old; my own preference is ATI/AMD, but any nVidia card old enough to use the open source nv driver well is fine also. I'd also go with something fanless just because it's less noise and one less thing to potentially fail. Fortunately, the same PCI Express slot standard has been used for video cards for well over a decade so you'll most likely be able to reuse the video card in a newer computer later.
From IsaacKuo in post #14

Quote:
I've got one eMachines still going strong after well over a decade. I also have a sizable collection of ex-eMachines that I have acquired over the years. Their computer cases are kind of nice homes for mini-ATX motherboards from various other computers. Like HP Pavillions and Sony Vaios...but those other makers liked to use weird power supplies. So when those power supplies died, I stuck their motherboards in dead eMachines cases. Those eMachines cases combine the mini-ATX mobo form factor with a full size standard ATX power supply.

If this eMachines computer is still healthy and functional after nearly a decade, I'd bet it's going to be fine for a while.
In post #6 Isaac recommends getting a new video card and mentions the ability to reuse it in a future build.

In post #14 Isaac touts the durability of eMachines.

However in post #22 also from IsaacKuo

Quote:
Actually, there was another really useful piece of information there - the fact that the maker is eMachines is significant because it (unfortunately) says a lot about the quality of the computer's components. The truth is, not everybody is magically some expert in knowing exactly what information is relevant and what is definitely not useful.
In this post Isaac now claims that eMachines are of poor quality.

Perhaps I read Isaac's posts #6 and #14 before making my post in #15 and didn't realize that suddenly eMachines were now of poor quality just 8 posts later in a post also from IsaacKuo.
 
Old 07-11-2017, 07:25 PM   #25
aus9
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Hi

Quote:
think I'm going to just install flavors
Bad boy! Just run live flavours until you find one you like.

I agree with IsaacKuo in suggesting try Debian.....but I modify to say Debian derivatives first.
I would start with MX
http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=mx
Quote:
it is a mid-weight operating system designed to combine an elegant and efficient desktop with simple configuration, high stability, solid performance and medium-sized footprint.
and if too slow go to its cousin which is antiX
http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=antix

Quote:
antiX offers users the "antiX Magic" in an environment suitable for old computers
 
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Old 07-11-2017, 08:14 PM   #26
tofino_surfer
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Quote:
I see you've never serviced an emachines computer before. When that crappy psu that emachines typically uses blows, it will quite likely take out the motherboard, cpu and graphics card with it. Also, emachines usually put the lowest spec'ed psu that will run the build in their computers. The psu may not even be capable of supporting a graphics card. Did a little googling and found this discussion regarding attempting to upgrade the graphics card on an emachines W3653:
You are correct sir in that I personally have not serviced an emachines computer before. However you know who has many times, LQ Senior Member IsaacKuo. In his post #14 directly preceding mine he touted the reliability of eMachines and noted the "full size standard ATX power supply". He did not mention its supposed poor PSU quality.

In an earlier post #6 IsaacKuo also recommended getting a new video card albeit old and cheap and noted that "Fortunately, the same PCI Express slot standard has been used for video cards for well over a decade so you'll most likely be able to reuse the video card in a newer computer later"

Was I wrong to read his posts and believe them ? Is it wrong to believe LQ senior members ? You are also an ... LQ senior member.

Since IsaacKuo in post #6 also claimed that "you'll most likely be able to reuse the video card in a newer computer later" and in post #14 mentioned "So when those power supplies died, I stuck their motherboards in dead eMachines cases. Those eMachines cases combine the mini-ATX mobo form factor with a full size standard ATX power supply." and made no mention of the supposed poor PSU quality then why are you attacking me ?
 
Old 07-12-2017, 01:46 AM   #27
IsaacKuo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tofino_surfer View Post
From IsaacKuo in post #6



From IsaacKuo in post #14



In post #6 Isaac recommends getting a new video card and mentions the ability to reuse it in a future build.

In post #14 Isaac touts the durability of eMachines.

However in post #22 also from IsaacKuo



In this post Isaac now claims that eMachines are of poor quality.

Perhaps I read Isaac's posts #6 and #14 before making my post in #15 and didn't realize that suddenly eMachines were now of poor quality just 8 posts later in a post also from IsaacKuo.
Dude. In none of my posts have I suggested anything other than the poor quality of eMachines components (other than the outer cases, which are pretty nice - having a full size ATX PSU is awesome for swapping/replacing/upgrading the PSU). I have had a LOT of eMachines die on me and friends and family, which is why I've got so many eMachines cases to begin with. One or two of them got lucky and are still going strong. The rest died, and died early.

I naturally suggested doing an upgrade with a cheap video card. Nothing fancy, and noting that the long standing PCI Express standard means the card would likely still be useful later on. Is it possible for the video card to die if other components in the computer fail? Sure. I've never had that happen yet, but it's certainly possible. But I'll play the odds and just go for it anyway with a cheap video card. Everything in life has some risk.

I don't know what the heck your problem is, but most of us here are just trying to be helpful.
 
Old 07-12-2017, 02:16 AM   #28
IsaacKuo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kilgoretrout View Post
I see you've never serviced an emachines computer before. When that crappy psu that emachines typically uses blows, it will quite likely take out the motherboard, cpu and graphics card with it.
Well, I've serviced a number of eMachines computers, and there's a certain self selection effect because my friends and family know I'm the guy to turn to when their computers die. I don't see the ones that never had a problem.

My own experience is that yeah those PSUs and mobos are pretty awful but it's still only one major component that fails at a time. Usually the mobo, which is when I consider the original computer officially dead. The PSU? Meh, I have a TON of crappy full size ATX PSUs, so I don't even really distinguish the eMachines PSUs from the rest. (Well, there's those damn Dell PSUs which, despite being full size ATX, have cables so short that they practically can't be swapped into other cases.)

So long as they're full size ATX, it's just part of my collection of crummy PSUs which will likely fail at some point. The handful of good PSUs I've had I tend to give to others while servicing their computers. I had been holding onto my best ATX PSU for my old file server, but I finally gave that one away last year to a flood victim who lost a lot in the flood.

Now that I'm so low on decent ATX PSUs, I just live with risk when it comes to most of my desktop machines. Obviously I'd buy another good ATX PSU for a desktop that's really important to me, but the ones with the crappy PSUs are throwaround machines. With friends and family, a dead PSU or a dead anything in a computer means not having access to their computer for some time. With me, a dead PSU or anything else means I just swap hard drives and maybe restore stuff from backup and there it is (linux, of course, doesn't care about this the way Windows cares).
Quote:
Also, emachines usually put the lowest spec'ed psu that will run the build in their computers. The psu may not even be capable of supporting a graphics card. Did a little googling and found this discussion regarding attempting to upgrade the graphics card on an emachines W3653:

https://answers.yahoo.com/question/i...6013438AAhdJEx
That was someone trying to upgrade with a high power video card, trying to boost a low grade eMachines into a gaming rig. So that's not surprising. The sort of cheap video card I'd recommend just to get dual monitor output wouldn't draw so much power. I've never had a power draw issue with the cheap business/productivity video cards I favor (and fanless video cards are invariably low end in terms of power).

But then of course, I don't have much experience with stock eMachines power supplies since they tend to go bad early on.

Quote:
As far as the 64 bit compatibility goes, let me reiterate, the cpu is definitely 64 bit capable. However, the initial build was for a 32 bit OS. Under these circumstance, I've seen the motherboard bios locked to 32 bit OSes only. If you have trouble installing a 64 bit OS that's probably the reason why.
Good to know to look out for. I haven't run into that problem yet.
 
Old 07-12-2017, 03:10 AM   #29
mrmazda
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Cheap power supplies are typically cheap in large part by being built with poor grade components. eMachines power supplies are little different from other cheap power supplies other than having a reputation for killing other components when they die. For the do it yourself types and those on minimal budgets, cheap power supplies typically can be improved upon through a relatively simple process of replacing the junk brand electrolytic capacitors in them with less than $10 worth of quality parts with matching specifications made by major brands UCC, Panasonic, Nichicon or Rubycon.

I wouldn't expect addition of an ATI or NVidia PCIe gfxcard that uses a passive heat sink and does not require a dedicated power connector to overload any ATX OEM power supply that I've encountered. All such can handle all the RAM an mATX motherboard can support, an entry level PCIe gfxcard, a floppy drive, a DVD drive, one 3.5" HD, one CPU fan, and one case fan, with adequate reserve for additional fans and/or a second or maybe even a third HD. Maybe if the motherboard had all 3 PCI slots populated along with more than 2 HDs, a PCIe gfxcard might overload a 200W or 220W PS as typically cheap power supplies are, but it really would be a surprise with a 65W TDP CPU as an E1200 is.

Any PCIe spec 2.0 or older card off eBay or equivalent ought to be adequate to the OP's task. A rather newer 3.0 model might not be supported by an old motherboard. A Radeon X300 with only 128M RAM is the only older PCIe card that ever gave me trouble in Linux, and I think that card was simply defective.

I too find the old mini tower eMachine cases quite nice places to provide a home for quality power supplies and better mATX motherboards.
 
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Old 07-12-2017, 04:05 AM   #30
darry1966
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tofino_surfer View Post
There are only three lines of relevant text information in that crappy cellphone picture. You could have easily typed out those three lines instead of lazily providing a bad picture.

Let me do it for you.

Processor: Intel Celeron CPU E1200 @ 1.6GHz
Memory (RAM): 2.00 GB
System type: 32-bit Operating System


See that wasn't that hard and its not even my post.

If you want help from volunteers you need to put some effort into your posts. It is much easier for volunteers to read what I typed and what you definitely should have than to have to download a crappy picture and read from it.



If the machine fails tomorrow a modest new card could of course still be used in a future build. They aren't welding it into the old machine. It is a reusable component.

Also the rusty Pinto and new rims is a bad analogy as that would only be cosmetic. A new card would greatly improve the performance of an old machine.

There is one major advantage to having a separate card and that is the video RAM. Even a modest $60 NVidia GT 730 has 2 GB of video RAM, as much as the computer itself. With a slow processor and only 2GB RAM a card like this would allow video information (buffers) to be offloaded to the card as well as speeding up the graphics. There would be more of the 2GB RAM available for actually running programs.
I don't believe there was a need to be rude to someone seeking advice. Wouldn't be surprised if he never posted again.
 
  


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