LinuxQuestions.org

LinuxQuestions.org (/questions/)
-   Linux - Newbie (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/)
-   -   wht exactly does tar do , im tryin to figure out what that does (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/wht-exactly-does-tar-do-im-tryin-to-figure-out-what-that-does-471189/)

adamf4i 08-05-2006 11:14 PM

wht exactly does tar do , im tryin to figure out what that does
 
does it install something , and whats .bz2

jrdioko 08-05-2006 11:23 PM

You can think of tar kind of like zip on Windows. A tar file (foo.tar) is an archive, or basically one file that contains a whole directory structure of files. Tar files are often compressed with either gzip or bzip2. These make the tar file take up less space. One compressed with gzip looks like foo.tar.gz, and one compressed with bzip2 looks like foo.tar.bz2.

A lot of software for Linux comes in a compressed .tar.gz or .tar.bz2 package, which is then extracted.

adamf4i 08-05-2006 11:29 PM

ok how would i unzip and install this file MPlayer-1.0pre8.tar.bz2

jrdioko 08-05-2006 11:31 PM

To decompress and untar a tar file, you use either

Code:

tar zxvf filename.tar.gz
OR
tar jxvf filename.tar.bz2

depending on whether gzip or bzip2 is used. That should extract everything to a directory, which you can then look in to see how to install. If it's a source package, the next step is to look at the INSTALL file in the extracted directory.

adamf4i 08-05-2006 11:34 PM

k i ran the jxvf command now how do i install the mplayer

jrdioko 08-05-2006 11:37 PM

Open the directory that was created when you ran that command, and see if there's an INSTALL file there. If so, follow the instructions there. Otherwise, look for a README file in that directory or installation notes on the site where you downloaded the file.

adamf4i 08-05-2006 11:39 PM

i cant find anything for some reason wht is wrong here , no install anywhere in teh folder

adamf4i 08-05-2006 11:56 PM

im tryinto memorize teh switches with tar, and rpm, can someonefill me in on them like each with each task

masonm 08-06-2006 12:06 AM

A .tar file is used to patch a .road file

to unzip a .bz2 you use tar -xvjf filename

go to the directory that just created, then run ./configure
make
(as root) make install

ErrorBound 08-06-2006 02:16 AM

If you have Mandrake, then there is a much easier way of installing software than from source...

jrdioko 08-06-2006 01:20 PM

Easier than typing "./configure && make && make install"? That seems pretty easy to me. But better in terms of how you keep track of packages on your system, probably yes.

debiant 08-06-2006 01:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jrdioko
Easier than typing "./configure && make && make install"? That seems pretty easy to me. But better in terms of how you keep track of packages on your system, probably yes.


Of course if you want to be able to use the mplayer gui, you have to use the flag --enable-gui with ./configure otherwise you have to start over.

jrdioko 08-06-2006 01:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by debiant
Of course if you want to be able to use the mplayer gui, you have to use the flag --enable-gui with ./configure otherwise you have to start over.

True. Well, maybe someone who knows Mandrake can tell the OP the package way to install mplayer.

ErrorBound 08-06-2006 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jrdioko
Easier than typing "./configure && make && make install"? That seems pretty easy to me. But better in terms of how you keep track of packages on your system, probably yes.

In my experience it goes more like:
Code:

./configure
make
# cross fingers && wait for 10 minutes
(fails compile)
# install correct kernel-headers
make clean
./configure
make
make install
# hope I enabled the right features in ./configure and the thing actually works

I suppose you could say I'm an avid apt-getter.

lotusjps46 08-06-2006 02:45 PM

Ok, I went and got that package, and untarred it. The thing you are looking for is in the directory that tar made, in the file called README. It gives detailed instructions on how to install the package. What you have here is a copy of all the files that the guy who wrote MPlayer wrote. None of it is compiled into working software. The process described in README is for compiling the files into a working binary system.

MPlayer can be tricky to install this way, and I admire your efforts to get it working. It would be much easier to use a pre-compiled package made for Mandrake 9.1. In that case it is just a matter of downloading the MPlayer
RPM file, opening the Package Manager in KDE, and selecting the package. It will install it without having to compile it (it is already compiled). There is a copy of this rpm on the install CD's you used to install Mandrake, but it is not going to be this latest version.

Mandrake 9.1 is quite old by Linux standards. I had it on my server for a year or more. Mandrake does nnot exist anymore; they were bought by Conectiva, and are called Mandriva now.

Is there a reason that the old version of MPlayer will not do what you want it to do?

C


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:18 AM.