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Old 12-16-2019, 05:52 PM   #1
fixi
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Which U.S. Linux?


New to Linux. Had used Linux Mint 18.1 Mate for a brief time. Would perfer a U.S. based organization. Want a stable, plain system and not needing latest out-there things. Used Windows 7. Computers to use Linux are: Acer Aspire 57334Z-4836 3 gb mem or Toshiba Satellite A215-S4747 4 gb mem. Not a developer but will use Ruby, Python and possibly C++. Is a version of Fedora or even CentOS suggested? Thanks for helping.
 
Old 12-16-2019, 06:46 PM   #2
jefro
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Hello and welcome to LQ.

I get the feeling you need a 32 bit OS based on ram.???

See distrowatch maybe for origin of distro. https://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major

Since you want to be developer oriented then consider mainstream maybe.
 
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Old 12-16-2019, 06:48 PM   #3
dugan
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Off the top of my head: Slackware and Pop!_OS are U.S.-based.
 
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Old 12-16-2019, 06:53 PM   #4
yancek
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Fedora is bleeding edge and test system for Red Hat with frequent new releases and short term support so if you don't need that, CentOS is more stable. Slackware of course is very stable.
 
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Old 12-16-2019, 08:03 PM   #5
cwizardone
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PCLinuxOS is U.S. based.

https://distrowatch.com/table.php?di...tion=pclinuxos
 
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Old 12-18-2019, 06:27 PM   #6
jmgibson1981
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If I may, why the US based requirement?
 
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Old 12-18-2019, 06:30 PM   #7
sevendogsbsd
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Open source by its very nature is global: you have no idea who is working on what project. I do tend to avoid distros written entirely in countries adversarial to mine, but other than that, I don't care. In 2 decades, I have never once had any sort of issue with any open source software or OS caused by the software origin.
 
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Old 12-18-2019, 10:14 PM   #8
frankbell
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I second what sevendogsbsd said.

Slackware is a good example. Its was first developed in the United States and its maintainer lives there, but its team is international.

That is likely the case with most other distros, regardless of where they are housed.
 
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Old 12-18-2019, 11:49 PM   #9
Merlin2
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I suggest you try Puppy Tahr it is available in several formats Form a bootable CD,USB Flash Drive or installed on your hard drive. This link is NOT from the puppy developers, but from a third party. https://www.how2shout.com/tools/pupp...-5-review.html
 
Old 12-19-2019, 11:28 AM   #10
DavidMcCann
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Remember that most versions of Linux are not produced by "organisations", whether in the US or anywhere else, but by un-incorporated groups. And if you do get one from a company with a US base, or even offices, (like Fedora or Suse) they won't give you things like media codecs that are patented in the US, so you have to get them from a foreign website.
 
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Old 12-21-2019, 06:18 AM   #11
baggister
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jmgibson1981 View Post
If I may, why the US based requirement?
Fixi, I'd like to know this as well.
 
Old 12-21-2019, 07:38 PM   #12
jmc1987
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Personally why does it have to be US Based too?

Opensource software doesn't really benefits jobs as they are mostly world projects that benefits everyone everywhere thanks to the people who volunteer to write code and or graphics to make it better.

But if you have to use a U.S based distro, then Slackware maybe for you.

This is what really throws me off. Linux Kernel was developed in Europe, and every Linux Distro is based on that kernel. So why does U.S. Based matter again?
 
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Old 12-28-2019, 05:50 AM   #13
Hermani
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Guess that OP fixi wants to exclude things like "Red Flag Linux" or the likes from his list. And I get that.

I'd go for one of the main stream distro's like Ubuntu (UK based) or CentOS (the latter because of its relationship to US based Red Hat) - I don't expect any of these to contain code you don't want on your system.
 
  


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