LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 12-15-2006, 09:56 AM   #1
itpurt
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Posts: 6

Rep: Reputation: 0
which linux is good for my system


i have an old pc - a pentium 2 processor running a windows 95. i want to install linux and use linux as the primary OS - no windows. also, this box does not has a running internet connection.

can anyone give me advice on what i should do??
which distribution should i use?
i started to install the current version of suse, but it is not working. i was in another forum and i was given advice to switch to another distribution.

if anyone can give me advice
i would really appreciate it.

thanks
itpurt
 
Old 12-15-2006, 09:58 AM   #2
arochester
Member
 
Registered: May 2006
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 608

Rep: Reputation: 98
How much RAM? How big Hard Drive?
 
Old 12-15-2006, 11:53 AM   #3
pixellany
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: Annapolis, MD
Distribution: Arch/XFCE
Posts: 17,802

Rep: Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738Reputation: 738
If you install SUSE (or any distro) and it does not work, then its best to find out WHY before starting to "distro-hop". When we know more about your system, we can give better advice.
 
Old 12-15-2006, 07:27 PM   #4
IndyGunFreak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Indpls
Distribution: Laptops: Debian Jessie XFCE, NAS: OpenMediaVault 3.0
Posts: 1,355

Rep: Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by itpurt
i have an old pc - a pentium 2 processor running a windows 95. i want to install linux and use linux as the primary OS - no windows. also, this box does not has a running internet connection.

can anyone give me advice on what i should do??
which distribution should i use?
i started to install the current version of suse, but it is not working. i was in another forum and i was given advice to switch to another distribution.

if anyone can give me advice
i would really appreciate it.

thanks
itpurt
Just personal experience here, but its gonna be tough to get any version of Linux up and running 100% w/o some sort of internet connection. Linux depends on connecting to servers, repositories, etc, for software updates, to download new software, etc. If you have some sort of always on connection, NIC cards are cheap, and so are routers, this would allow you to share internet access,.

That said, I really like Ubuntu 6.10

IGF
 
Old 12-15-2006, 09:24 PM   #5
snuffy
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
I have the CD "PC LINUX OS" it will not install on my system which is a 400hz, 6gb hard drive 512 ram and run windows 98 and use Wal-Mart as a internet service and have a 56K dialup service.
question: how to install linux without using msn os syatem and where can I get information on internet to get step by step instructions so I can download and install this CD?
Thanks
Bill
PS very new to linux as didn't know there were so many types or systems
and have no idea which one would be best to use
 
Old 12-15-2006, 09:51 PM   #6
Electro
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,042

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Any distribution will work. Since you have a dial-up connection, I suggest Ubuntu. Ubuntu provides free CD through mail, so you do not have to wait weeks just download an ISO image. I do not recommend SUSE, Fedora, and Mandriva for novice users.
 
Old 12-15-2006, 11:10 PM   #7
indienick
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2005
Location: London, ON, Canada
Distribution: Arch, Ubuntu, Slackware, OpenBSD, FreeBSD
Posts: 1,853

Rep: Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electro
I do not recommend SUSE, Fedora, and Mandriva for novice users.
I can't speak for Fedora and SuSE, but Mandriva is VERY beginner-friendly. I have Mandriva 2007 running on a Pentium 2 450MHz with 160MB of RAM, and a 160GB HD, and it runs flawlessly.

If you prefer a more "clean-cut" distro (ie. without bells and whistles), DamnSmallLinux is good for being out-of-the-box, but it's not really all that "new-to-linux" friendly. I've never used Ubuntu, but I've been put under the impression that it's like Mandriva in that it's very cushy, and has lots of "bloatware" (which to me, means ALOT of user-friendly GUIs).

Then again, an install of Gentoo, since everything is compiled from source, and you build the system from the ground up. Gentoo wouldn't be a bad place to start for learning Linux, just make sure you have a hard copy of the x86 Gentoo Linux Guide.
 
Old 12-16-2006, 04:45 AM   #8
IndyGunFreak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Indpls
Distribution: Laptops: Debian Jessie XFCE, NAS: OpenMediaVault 3.0
Posts: 1,355

Rep: Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by indienick
I can't speak for Fedora and SuSE, but Mandriva is VERY beginner-friendly. I have Mandriva 2007 running on a Pentium 2 450MHz with 160MB of RAM, and a 160GB HD, and it runs flawlessly.

If you prefer a more "clean-cut" distro (ie. without bells and whistles), DamnSmallLinux is good for being out-of-the-box, but it's not really all that "new-to-linux" friendly. I've never used Ubuntu, but I've been put under the impression that it's like Mandriva in that it's very cushy, and has lots of "bloatware" (which to me, means ALOT of user-friendly GUIs).

Then again, an install of Gentoo, since everything is compiled from source, and you build the system from the ground up. Gentoo wouldn't be a bad place to start for learning Linux, just make sure you have a hard copy of the x86 Gentoo Linux Guide.
Mandriva 07 to Ubuntu 6.10 is apples to oranges.

For me(2.6ghz, 1gig of ram, and another 2.1ghz machine), Mandriva 07 might be the most disappointing version of Linux I ever tried. It was as slow, if not slower than, Linspire/Freespire. My main PC, Ubuntu recognized most of my hardware, only only required me to configure my TV card. Ubuntu probably runs faster, for me, than any distro I've tried.

Fedora core 6 would be my second choice.

IGF
 
Old 12-16-2006, 05:37 AM   #9
pdean44
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Location: NY
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: 0
unbuntu

Currently I run Debian the next version up from stable. I have often wondered what versions of linux would tun best under old machines with low ram and processor power. So this is an interesting subject for me. I do not post very often but read these forums a lot for ideas and tips. I wanted to try unbuntu at one time as suggested here on the thread but for some odd reason it would not install. i love debian and want to stick with it. I liked the idea of unbuntu because it is more geared to the average home user.
 
Old 12-16-2006, 08:26 AM   #10
lotusjps46
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2003
Location: Dallas
Distribution: Vector Linux, Suse 10.1
Posts: 186

Rep: Reputation: 30
The original question was about old hardware

Mandriva, Ubuntu, Fedora, and other big distributions are meant for machines that will run the Microsoft XP system. You would not expect XP to run well on a Pentium 1 or even a 400Mhz machine. So pick something that is meant for a machine with less power.

Vector Linux works well. I am typing this on a 366Mhz PII laptop using Vector. Works great. Xubuntu works well too. It is very similar to Ubuntu but does not use the Gnome window manager. Damn Small Linux is real fast on that kind of hardware; definitely try it.

What you want is something that does not depend on KDE or Gnome for a window manager. Use Fluxbox or IceWM, or another window manager. You can add them and select at the log-in window.

Good luck.

C
 
Old 12-16-2006, 12:25 PM   #11
snuffy
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2006
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: 0
Thank you for the information.
Now if I get Ubuntu CD will it come with instructions on how to install?
snuffy
 
Old 12-16-2006, 01:07 PM   #12
Netizen
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: Texas
Distribution: Slackware and Ubuntu
Posts: 355

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by snuffy
Thank you for the information.
Now if I get Ubuntu CD will it come with instructions on how to install?
snuffy
Yes, at least how to start the install. The install works a lot like the windows install. If you have done that, you shouldn't have a problem.
 
Old 12-16-2006, 08:06 PM   #13
IndyGunFreak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Indpls
Distribution: Laptops: Debian Jessie XFCE, NAS: OpenMediaVault 3.0
Posts: 1,355

Rep: Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by snuffy
Thank you for the information.
Now if I get Ubuntu CD will it come with instructions on how to install?
snuffy
You may want to use Xubuntu for that old of a PC. The Desktop isn't quite as heavy as GNome/KDE, but still just as functional, it might help keep things up to snuff... The same OS, just works a little better with older PC's.

http://www.xubuntu.com

Ubuntu 6.10 Wiki...
http://ubuntuguide.org/wiki/Ubuntu:Edgy

IGF

Last edited by IndyGunFreak; 12-16-2006 at 08:10 PM.
 
Old 12-17-2006, 12:09 AM   #14
my.dying.bride
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2006
Distribution: Vector Soho Edition 5.1(Best yet)
Posts: 25

Rep: Reputation: 15
Ubuntu will not run nice on that machine. If you once liked Dos operating system I guess you may feel free to experiment with linux on that old machine. I reckon you are more used to Windows thought and therefore you should not run linux on a machine with specs less than what you run Windows NT on. I would try to give you an not real metaphor. Linux has core functionalities and a shell, somehow more similar to the Dos OS back in the old days. Since those days some desktop managers has been made. One may compare them to windows world as saying that the GUI of Windows 95 is one Desktop Manager, XP another. You probably think XP is a bit easier to use than Windows 95 and the same goes for the linux world. But then again we all know that XP will have trouble installing on old machines that easily manage Windows 95. Just the same for linux. And since many of these nice and easy to use features found in XP is not available in the Windows 95 "desktop manager" you may be forced back to use Dos more in Windows 95 than in XP. The same goes for linux. So if you are not afraid of using the Bash Shell (somehow like Linux-Dos) then go ahead. But if you are I would suggest that you install linux on your main machine (try dual boot) with the Gnome or KDE interface. I would also reckomend you, as mentioned earlier in this thread, being connected to the internet. Makes the introduction to linux a lot easier.

If you still want to try I would suggest a distro based on the XFCE Desktop Manager. Both Vector Linux (normal edition) and Xubuntu has been mentioned, and I can also recommend the same two distroes

Last edited by my.dying.bride; 12-17-2006 at 12:12 AM.
 
Old 12-17-2006, 12:13 AM   #15
rickh
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2004
Location: Albuquerque, NM USA
Distribution: Debian-Lenny/Sid 32/64 Desktop: Generic AMD64-EVGA 680i Laptop: Generic Intel SIS-AC97
Posts: 4,250

Rep: Reputation: 62
http://bea.cabarel.com/
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
good distro for an old system Chypmunk Linux - Software 13 09-27-2006 07:51 AM
About to buy iPod Nano for 100% Linux system - good move? Yalla-One Linux - Hardware 5 06-18-2006 04:55 PM
system.map, what's it good for? stabu Linux - Newbie 7 10-07-2005 07:31 PM
good distro for an old system? Brahl Linux - Distributions 5 01-30-2005 06:01 PM
What would be a good distro for my system? whishkah Linux - Distributions 6 06-23-2004 01:06 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:15 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration