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Old 01-01-2017, 05:17 AM   #1
grumpyskeptic
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Which Linux distributions have easy one-click program installation and uninstallation?


I am currently using Linux Mint Cinnamon 17.3 Rosa.

Linux Mint installs and uninstalls software very easily by making one-click in the Software Manager.

1) What other distributions of Linux (or similar) can install and uninstall programs in such an easy no-fuss way please?

2) Of these, which has the greatest range of useful software?

3) Does TrueOS fulfil 1) and with lots of software? I am thinking of TrueOS because of the security should anyone steal my computer, and because I imagine that it is more immune to malware of various kinds. On the other hand should things go wrong it may be difficult or impossible to recover data from the HD.

Thanks
 
Old 01-01-2017, 06:04 AM   #2
wpeckham
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Greetings and Happy New Year!

To #1, almost anything with a mature package manager with a GUI interface might fit. Any 'full' desktop distribution based upon RHEL/CentOS, Fedora, Ubuntu (including MINT), or Debian (Mint-DE) should fit. That is a LOT of distributions.

To #2, Debian has the greatest range of software options in my experience. Anything based upon Debian will have a huge range of software options in the main repos, and there are extension repos for many of these distributions that will expand your options even more.

That said, I would not restrict myself on that basis. If you consider only the packages you will actually USE in the next ten years, it is likely to be about 5% of those available. EVERY MAJOR DISTRIBUTION, and most of the minor distributions, have more than you will ever need for their targeted purpose. If it is to be a complete desktop, they will have a very complete range of options for desktop users.

TrueOS is not really a Linux distribution: it is a BSD distribution. As a BSD distribution it will have a solid and dependable range of software and drivers that will include MOST of what is available for Linux, and a very few BSD specific things Linux does not support. It will be at least as solid and dependable as a good Linux distribution, keeping in mind it strives to be somewhat "cutting edge" and may surprise you.

About #3: I do not use OpenZFS myself. I also do not use the kinds of disk encryption mentioned. I rarely use BSD, though it has never let me down when I have. That said, data security with encryption in place and management under failure/recovery situations have always required compromise.
The best answer I have for you is to record and securely store encryption keys and settings in an off-site location and BACK EVERYTHING UP OFTEN. Layers of backup, stored in a location that is NOT at the same risk as your machine, is key. Data security is not only ensuring that others do not get your data, but also ensuring YOU CAN get your data. That means you need encrypted copies that will not go away or become unusable if your PC is stolen or totally melts into a puddle of molten glass and scorched metal. There are no real shortcuts here, you either have backups or accept that under certain conditions your data will be GONE.

I hope that this is of help to you.
 
Old 01-01-2017, 07:54 AM   #3
Habitual
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I have to say, http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm
and the very thing you want to avoid is what makes Linux Strong.
Keeps the system safe.

One-click install and uninstalls?
Sounds exactly like Windows, if you ask me.
 
Old 01-01-2017, 09:39 AM   #4
hazel
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While I like the synaptic graphical interface to the apt package manager, which all members of the Debian family have available, I certainly wouldn't describe it as 1-click installation. Mint and Ubuntu both have "software centers" that sit on top of synaptic and require less work at the cost of being more opaque. I think the OP is asking what other distros have something like this.
 
Old 01-01-2017, 09:41 AM   #5
ondoho
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ubuntu.

but i'm 111% with the previous post.
 
Old 01-01-2017, 10:02 AM   #6
hydrurga
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Out of interest, why are you wanting to migrate away from Linux Mint?

I don't ask this as a Mint evangelist, but as someone who can't see in your original post a good reason for doing so.

Mint not only has a huge range of Mint and Ubuntu software to choose from, but also allows PPA installation of a great number of other applications (albeit this latter source is not "one-click"). It is also as immune to malware as most desktop linux distros, which means to say pretty darned immune as long as you follow normal security practices.
 
Old 01-01-2017, 10:53 AM   #7
wpeckham
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hydrurga View Post
Out of interest, why are you wanting to migrate away from Linux Mint?

I don't ask this as a Mint evangelist, but as someone who can't see in your original post a good reason for doing so.

Mint not only has a huge range of Mint and Ubuntu software to choose from, but also allows PPA installation of a great number of other applications (albeit this latter source is not "one-click"). It is also as immune to malware as most desktop linux distros, which means to say pretty darned immune as long as you follow normal security practices.
EXCELLENT question!
And I think #3 in the original post is a clue. He may be looking for first class encryption to protect his data.

grumpyskeptic: can you tell us if this is correct?
If it is, you should know that first class encryption CAN be added to Linux Mint!
 
Old 01-01-2017, 11:05 AM   #8
DavidMcCann
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If you have concerns about a laptop being stolen with sensitive data on it, then ecrypt /home. That is easiest to do if you do it during installation rather than afterwards. The ability to do that is not widely available but it is in Mint.
 
Old 01-01-2017, 01:13 PM   #9
dave@burn-it.co.uk
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Unless he is working for some secretive organisation, most "sensitive" data is just personal data and is not really going to be of much interest to many people. By all means keep banking information secure, but as fro most of the rest, forget it!.

I know many, many people who are super concerned about keeping their computer secure and refuse to do banking and such on it. yet they spend all day swapping al their private information across Facebook and the like.
 
Old 01-01-2017, 02:25 PM   #10
IndyGunFreak
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I personally hate Ubuntu Software Center (which is pretty much what the OP is describing). Maybe I'm just stuck in my old ways, but I greatly prefer Synaptic for a GUI. While I agree w/ the other poster that it's certainly not "1 click", if you know what you're looking for it's pretty darn close.

Usually though, I find myself using the apt in the command line to install software.
 
Old 01-01-2017, 02:38 PM   #11
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LinuxMint has synaptic and you can also encrypt during installation.
 
Old 01-02-2017, 08:31 AM   #12
sundialsvcs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habitual View Post
I have to say, http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm
and the very thing you want to avoid is what makes Linux Strong.
... but, "giving the Devil his due," the Windows operating system has a pretty darned good software installation infrastructure too, these days. (As does Apple.)

Basically, what you're looking for is a good automatic database of "what is installed here now, and at wha version," combined with a global database of available software packages and their dependencies. Most distributions now have this, or have access to one that they "borrow."

Whether it's "one-click" enough for you, is up to you.

... and, furthermore, every such system (even on Windows and Apple) will(!) at some time leave you with " ... while (true} { ... ... ... } ... ... " It's par for the course.

Last edited by sundialsvcs; 01-02-2017 at 08:36 AM.
 
  


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