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Old 08-24-2011, 11:31 PM   #1
sudershan
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which filesystem is the best JFS,XFS,EXT2,EXT3,RESERIFS.....


Hi
could you please help me out in knowing which of the file system in linux jfs,xfs,ext2,ext3,reserifs among must be used and why?
I will be grateful to you if you can make me clear about this file systems..
 
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:25 AM   #2
David the H.
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Well, first you have to define exactly what you mean by best. Is it speed? Stability? Size limits? Error handling? Recovery ability? Or what? Because there is no such thing as overall best, just best for your current purpose.

Once you know what you want out of a file system, then you should get on Google, Wikipedia, or whatever and do your own research to find out what they offer. That's how everyone else would determine which one to use.


Now, that said, if we assume you're just running a regular, stand-alone PC system, my recommendation is that you really shouldn't worry about it. Go with the default ext3/4, which are quite adequate, quite stable, and come with a mature set of tools for manipulation and recovery. Unless you really need what they have to offer, the advanced, high performance, and experimental filesystems are usually more trouble than they're worth for the average user.
 
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Old 08-25-2011, 05:07 AM   #3
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David the H. View Post
...define exactly what you mean by best. Is it speed?
And, even if you mean speed, you'll have to define 'speed doing what' in some more detail.

You could have a look on phoronix (other specific tests are available, and have the potential to add to the confusion considerably), for example, for some test results, but you'll only get confused...but, at least you'll be better informed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by David the H. View Post
Now, that said, if we assume you're just running a regular, stand-alone PC system, my recommendation is that you really shouldn't worry about it. Go with the default ext3/4, which are quite adequate, quite stable, and come with a mature set of tools for manipulation and recovery.
Exactly; you have asked a question the answer to which, even if there was a definable single-valued answer to the question, wouldn't help you. You really, as far as I can tell, just want something to use which will work in some particular situation and work decently well.

If ext4 is supported by your distro, and the support is reasonably mature, as it should be under any recent distro, use that; if only ext3, use that; if neither of the above, then more info is required, because you are obviously in some rather niche situation.

Other answers (which may or may not be better, but would be different) could be available, if you are not running a hard disk, you are running, eg, a database server, an embedded Linux project of some kind, or some other specialised use case. But still, ext4 or ext3 is probably quite a workable answer, and you'll probably never make back the time that you spend in researching this particular detail. Don't let me put you off, if, however, you just like knowing this stuff for the sake of it - in that case, you'll be polishing up your search-fu as I write.
 
Old 08-25-2011, 06:21 AM   #4
jheengut
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reserifs

The best supported file systems on linux should make no difference for until you are up to optimize your system for a particular.

I use at seven file system with 48 logical volumes and 8 partitions.

Each one of them is suited (after I optimized it )
 
Old 08-25-2011, 12:41 PM   #5
wpeckham
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Best???

If you mean best general FS for normal use on a simple desktop system, I recommend EXT4 if your distribution supports booting to it, ext3 otherwise. Both are excellent for general use, EXT4 somewhat more efficient and with expanded limits.

Both use journals to make them more reliable.
Many of the others require special tools that may or may not install by default, or entail additional risk under certain conditions. All have their advantages for conditions where they are optimal.

When in doubt, see what your distribution install DEFAULTS to and use that. You know that one is well tested by the maintainers, the alpha test team, and the general community.
 
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Old 08-25-2011, 01:30 PM   #6
floppy_stuttgart
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sudershan View Post
Hi
could you please help me out in knowing which of the file system in linux jfs,xfs,ext2,ext3,reserifs among must be used and why?
I will be grateful to you if you can make me clear about this file systems..
I was recommended:
- ext4 for HDDs
- ext2 for CF/SD cards or USB sticks
So far i uinderstood, ext2 seems to write less than ext4 which is good for lifetime of USBs or CF memories
 
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