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Old 08-24-2013, 12:25 AM   #1
tyko
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Which distro for day-to-day time-saving use


Please help me in choosing a Linux distro for day-to-day use. My criteria is to save time. A distro for which I don't have to do much internet searches that "how to do this". Also don't want to do much searches like "how to correct this", "what does this error means".

I'm trying CentOS 6.4 but I'm finding it buggy; maybe it's called "stable" and "solid" for command line use, I'm finding it buggy for using it through GUI (desktop environment). Example, when I opened the Add / Remove Programs on fresh install, it gave me an error; searching on internet I found that some others are also getting the same error. There are other bugs too.

Search for most bug-free is returning Debian.

Search for best for beginners is returning Mint. But the articles I've seen recommending Mint for beginners aren't sharing good reasons for their opinion.

So which distro should I choose? Please share why do you think so.
 
Old 08-24-2013, 02:27 AM   #2
Timothy Miller
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No distro is going to be perfect if you don't understand how to fix issues. Even Debian, whose stable branch is EXTREMELY well tested and stable, once in a while has an issue. Also, Debian is, by default, NOT geared toward full gui usage. While you can use gui programs to do add/remove, it's geared towards learning the command line and using the apt utilities.

While it might not be what you want to hear, I say stay with Windows until you're willing to take the time to learn linux, as you're not going to be happy expecting a flawless install that never has an issue and you never have to fix anything without resorting to command line. Once you've decided you want to learn, then Mint is fine as a first step. Based on Ubuntu but gets rid of their malware, includes codecs so it can do things such as play mp3's and DVD's "out of the box", and puts a high focus on simplicity, while also trying to stay moderately current with the software offered. But it's not perfect.
 
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Old 08-24-2013, 03:21 AM   #3
itlb
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Which distro for day-to-day time-saving use

Safest bet is Debian, although I would have said CentOS is pretty stable tbh...
 
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Old 08-24-2013, 11:46 AM   #4
DavidMcCann
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Whether you need to search for how-tos will depend on what you need to do. The example I always give is configuring USB speakers. If you have them, they're part of day-to-day use, but if you haven't they're exotic. With CentOS, I activated them by going to System - Preferences - Sound in the menu; in Debian I had to delete two lines in /etc/modprobe.d/alsa-base.conf and re-boot! The software in Debian is very stable, but the installer and configuration tools (or rather the lack of them) can be a problem:
http://www.linuxquestions.org/review...p/product/2596

As you see, I use CentOS and Salix; principally because they're enterprise quality. Mint is the best of the Debian derivatives, and you might like PCLinuxOS.
 
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Old 08-24-2013, 11:53 AM   #5
snowpine
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Linux Mint has been the biggest time-saver distro for me, hands down.
 
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Old 08-24-2013, 12:07 PM   #6
baldy3105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowpine View Post
Linux Mint has been the biggest time-saver distro for me, hands down.
+1

Ubuntu or Mint are the best I've found for new users. Try both!
 
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Old 08-24-2013, 05:43 PM   #7
tyko
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Thank you everyone for your very useful replies and for your time.

It seems that I'll have similar experience on Debian as I'm having on CentOS: They both are great for using through command line but not friendly for a beginner trying to use through GUI. I'm choosing the Ubuntu based Mint.
 
Old 08-24-2013, 07:09 PM   #8
Habitual
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Mint is a Great Choice.
 
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Old 08-24-2013, 08:25 PM   #9
CrackerPunk
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@ tyko

You can try slackware. It's been around since the 90s. Very stable and powerful. If compiling software doesn't meet your criteria than the other distros that were mentioned are good options.

You should try as much distros as you can, you'll know you found the right one when it clicks for you.

Last edited by CrackerPunk; 08-24-2013 at 08:31 PM.
 
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Old 08-24-2013, 10:47 PM   #10
lobogobo
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Before you load anythine onto your HD, why not try some of the disto's and run them live from a usb or cd/dvd untill you find one you like. I did this untill I settled on AntiX.
 
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Old 08-25-2013, 02:50 AM   #11
grahamj80
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Centos is the best one
 
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Old 08-25-2013, 03:58 AM   #12
kooru
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Linux Mint sure.
 
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