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-   -   Where would i begin? (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/where-would-i-begin-88353/)

Anzenia 09-02-2003 08:18 AM

Where would i begin?
 

Im a fresh graduate of computer science and i got a job recently which is as an educator of a computer school and one of the assigned subjects that im going to teach is Linux...its pretty hard on my side because i hardly know this stuff.
I started reading recently and i find it confusing of most ways...im into Redhat 7.3 now.
I know i have to read everything first about linux but i just take this opportunity to ask you guys whom i think are all linux enthusiast, am i right? ;)
I would highly appreciate if you all could have feedback, suggestions, comments and may i say "violent reactions" regarding this matter.

:newbie:

bitpicker 09-02-2003 08:36 AM

First I'd advise you to get a book on Linux which is expressly NOT about a specific distribution. Something which gives you in-depth information about the system itself and the command line - this is where most Linux systems are more or less similar, and it will give you the knowledge to find out on your own in what way specific distributions differ.

Then work with Linux, try things out, ask questions here, read other people's questions and answers, and you will find that you gradually learn all you need to know. I have started only a couple of months ago and I find myself answer more questions than I ask already :) - which is not to say that my answers are particularly helpful, but I try.

Robin

dalek 09-02-2003 10:49 AM

Same here
 
I'm with bitpicker. I started last march and I to answer a lot of questions and have wrote a couple of how to's for newbies.

Just read and try things. You'll learn. The students will teach you. They will ask a question and you'll have to find the answer.


:D :D :D :D

BTW, you may want to try a newer version of Linux. Either Redhat or Mandrake, my personal favorite.

darthtux 09-02-2003 12:46 PM

Read the Linux Documentation Project Guides
http://www.tldp.org

Since your running Red Hat, read the manuals
http://www.redhat.com/docs/manuals/linux

Greyweather 09-02-2003 01:18 PM

Depending on just how much you want to know, you might want to look at http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

DrOzz 09-02-2003 02:40 PM

here is a very good book that touches upon quite alot of areas..

Anzenia 09-03-2003 05:41 AM

Thanks for replying here guys! :)
I'll use all the links you've all posted.

Like what bitpicker, i have to read something else thats not about distro's because primarily for all those distro's that were out there, its really confusing of what is to pick.
A friend of mine also whose into linux told me that its better for a beginner like me to start the Linux with the older version coz it would give me the basic fundamentals and so if i try the newer version there would be no much puzzles and confusion on my mind on what and how is this.

...and to Dalek, yes you're right, The students will teach me and so i am to them.

:D

koyi 09-03-2003 09:08 AM

I think the best distro to learn linux is slackware. I have started using linux with redhat 7.3, then 8.0, 9.0 for almost a year before I switched to slackware 9.0 one month ago. And I found that within this one month I have learnt much more than what I have learnt with redhat. I am not saying that redhat is no good. It is good and convenient to use but not so good to learn and play with becoz they have many tools that you can only find in redhat. :)

These are only my personal opinions, anyway.

darthtux 09-03-2003 12:09 PM

Red Hat has their own tools but you can always do things the comman-line way. Plus you can always download other tools from the web.

I use Red Hat because I hope to be a Linux Sys Admin and the vast majority of companies here in the US will want you to know Red Hat.

Genesee 09-03-2003 02:08 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Greyweather
Depending on just how much you want to know, you might want to look at http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/
I agree with Greyweather - after you get used to Linux via one of the easier distros (RH, Mandrake, etc.), building an LFS will force you to learn *everything* inside and out.

It's intimidating, but the documentation on the LFS site is excellent, and after the initial shock a comp. sci. major would probably love it :D.

good luck
:cool:

bitpicker 09-04-2003 10:14 AM

"A friend of mine also whose into linux told me that its better for a beginner like me to start the Linux with the older version coz it would give me the basic fundamentals and so if i try the newer version there would be no much puzzles and confusion on my mind on what and how is this."

To my knowledge Linux is becoming easier, not harder. The actual command line work etc. has remained pretty much the same for the past few years, anything found in older books still seems to apply in this regard. More recent versions will support a wider variety of modern hardware and will have simpler setups. The newer GUIs have changed most considerably but that usually means more comfort and accessibility along with more functions.

Robin

schbond 09-20-2003 04:42 PM

If you haven't already, take a look at the Slackware Linux Book:

http://www.slackware.org/book/

I know bitpicker said not to read about specific distros at first, but most if not all of the info in the Slackware book applies to Linux in general.

I ran Slackware for about 5-6 months, and I'd have to say the Slackware Linux Book was the most useful tool, and I still recommend it, even if you don't use Slack. Good luck!

edit: ok, maybe not all, but check out the sections on configuration, shell, filesystem, etc.


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