LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 05-18-2010, 08:41 AM   #16
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,899
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186

Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by alli_yas View Post
Same advice as given to chrisbaby - install one or more distro's; experiment and learn how to do simple things - working your way up to more complex stuff.

We all started in this boat and believe me when I say that EVERYONE including the senior members/Gurus/Mods learns new stuff constantly This is the beauty of Linux
I totally agree with you!

If you don't learn something new everyday then I say that you are not doing anything.

 
Old 05-18-2010, 09:18 AM   #17
MTK358
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 6,443
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721
First, read this:

http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm

Also check out he tutorials in my sig.
 
Old 05-18-2010, 10:02 AM   #18
dakoder
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Swindon Wiltshire England Earth
Distribution: Debian, mint-9, tinycore
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
To help beginners somebody ( or all of us ) should compile a simple ISO of LINUX and write a series of pages which detail how to
do things like
* how to navigate the bash terminal.
* mount a USB stick for simple data transfer.
* how to edit the interfaces file and use ifdown / ifup.
* how to use apt-get or aptitude to install a few tools such as NASM, G++ TEX , X11 etc.

It would be nice to point potential newcomers to a 'hello linux world' distro which gave a gentle transition from windows/dos to x-windows/bash

what does everyone else think ?
 
Old 05-18-2010, 10:16 AM   #19
MTK358
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 6,443
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakoder View Post
* how to navigate the bash terminal.
The tutorials on LinuxCommand are available in PDF format, that could be a good option.

Or it might be best to write a tutorial optimized for the tutorial distro.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dakoder View Post
* mount a USB stick for simple data transfer.
A good explanation of the /dev/* naming scheme and "fdisk -l" are important. I wish I knew that better when I switched.

It might be a good idea to have pmount on it, as well a a GUI file manager that can mount disks (but only when you tell it, not auto-mount when you plug it in).

Quote:
Originally Posted by dakoder View Post
* how to edit the interfaces file and use ifdown / ifup.
What's ifdown/ifup?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dakoder View Post
* how to use apt-get or aptitude to install a few tools such as NASM, G++ TEX , X11 etc.
Great idea. One of the major reasons I didn't like Linux the first few times I tried was because I didn't understand packages.

Also I didn't know about package managers. I went to websites and downloaded RPMs having no clue to what the hell was going on.

I might have noticed an "Add/Remove Software" thing, but I thought it was like Windows's add/remove software thing.

A good explanation of what packages, dependencies, and package managers are is key!

But personally I'm not a fan of apt-get. I would choose yum or pacman (but there are many others which I haven't tried that might be better) if it was my decision.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dakoder View Post
It would be nice to point potential newcomers to a 'hello linux world' distro which gave a gentle transition from windows/dos to x-windows/bash

what does everyone else think ?
Sure!

And another thing:

The first few times I unsuccessfully tried Linux the first thing I did (still being a Windows user clueless about Linux at the time) was frantically install firewalls, antivirus, anti-spyware, etc.

It has to say that that's not neseccary in Linux.

Last edited by MTK358; 05-18-2010 at 10:25 AM.
 
Old 05-18-2010, 10:36 AM   #20
chrisbaby-nz
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 3

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
To the members that wanted to know what I meant by smart software

I am building a machine called a long folder.
It folds sheet metal as used in roofing.

The machine has back gages that allow the machine to fold without any human touch other than placing the sheet metal in the machine.

The machine will have the ability work out and fold taper folds

My machine will have two folding beams so that it will fold up and down without spinning or roiling the sheet.

I will be taking a older folder costing around $40,000 and modifying it to perform as good if not better than a new one.

The only folder in the world that dose this at present cost over $700,000 and has a 2 year back order waiting list.

The smart software must be able to work out the angles and the sheet size ,set the back gages, first to cut the sheet to size. than readjust for the folding operation at the same time keeping a watch on the safety protocols regarding the machine and performance.

And that is just a sample of what the software will have to do.
ambitious yes but it is doable
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-18-2010, 01:52 PM   #21
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,899
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186
Hi,

Then I would look at using a embed for the machine control. There are several options to choose from. Simple search here on LQ will help you.


Linux - Embedded here on LQ may help.

 
Old 05-18-2010, 02:04 PM   #22
fruttenboel
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2008
Location: Tilburg NL
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 ciurrent, kernel 3.18.11
Posts: 270

Rep: Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisbaby-nz View Post
I have no idea how to use Linux let alone write programs for it.
I had similar feelings when i started with Linux.

Quote:
All know is that I have plans to build a machine that requires pretty smart software. so what to do about it. Well I better Learn about it.
When you want to learn how to use a first Linux, there are only few Linuxes you may want to use. All of them are Command Line Interface (CLI) Linuxes like Debian, Slackware, Red Hat. You install using a text interface. You configure using a text editor. When it all works, you startx. I myself am a Slackware adept. Slackware has a steep lurning curve. If you can drive the Slackware car (takes a few months to master but there's a lot of documentation available), you can drive ANY other Linux car (with some time to get used to the other system).

See also http://fruttenboel.verhoeven272.nl/linux/index.html

I personally adore the Modula-2 language so I run with the Mocka compiler http://fruttenboel.verhoeven272.nl/mocka/index.html Other people still use C and its derivatives.

Quote:
We have similar machines at work but they use windows xp and to be honest windows xp sucks.
Don't underestimate XP. It's probably the best version of Windows ever made by Microsoft.

Quote:
So my question to you guys is where do I start.
Snatch yourself a copy of Slackware and then see how far you get. Slackware is the Linux that is still closest to the original Linuxes of the early 90's. But that's my opinion.
 
Old 05-18-2010, 02:17 PM   #23
fruttenboel
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2008
Location: Tilburg NL
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 ciurrent, kernel 3.18.11
Posts: 270

Rep: Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisbaby-nz View Post
I am building a machine called a long folder.
It folds sheet metal as used in roofing.
I guess the machine already has a PLC that actuates the motors and plungers. Your program will talk to the PLC via serial or USB connections?

Or is it a bare machine with virtually no control interface?

In the latter case you may get some new ideas by looking at either of these pages:

+ http://fruttenboel.verhoeven272.nl/parino/index.html
+ http://fruttenboel.verhoeven272.nl/Pico/index.html
+ http://fruttenboel.verhoeven272.nl/proto/index.html

Sounds like an interesting project.
 
Old 05-18-2010, 02:25 PM   #24
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,899
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186
Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by fruttenboel View Post
I had similar feelings when i started with Linux.<snip>

Snatch yourself a copy of Slackware and then see how far you get. Slackware is the Linux that is still closest to the original Linuxes of the early 90's. But that's my opinion.
I really can't associate with frustrations at the start of my computer involvement back in the sixties. I've blocked out some of that time because of that damn punch card machine. Still would have nightmares if I didn't block it.

I can only attest to my experience with aiding people to understand computer, OS and whatever. You find that most have frustrations somewhat but when they are enlightened then things start to change. You have to want to do something in order to overcome the frustration. Read, perform and read some more until you can accomplish the required task(s).

As for Slackware, I too recommend the new user to try it. The myth that Slackware is hard is not correct, it is difficult for someone who doesn't read documentation or willing to dig deep into the intrinsic details of a beautiful stable OS. There's plenty of documentation and aid from resourceful users here on LQ. So Get Slack!


The above link and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
Old 05-18-2010, 07:20 PM   #25
dakoder
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Swindon Wiltshire England Earth
Distribution: Debian, mint-9, tinycore
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
linux is just perfect for embedded applications...
it is a shining example of easy it is to INPUT ---- PROCESS ---- OUTPUT data

BTW ifup/ifdown is a DEBIAN thing.

I really think we should get together here and build a really good solid 'HELLO LINUX' package for beginners with step by step instructions on how to install / setup and maintain thir machine.
Live disks are just screaming to help new users play with linux with no risks to the resident OS.

the latest cover disk on LINUX FORMAT magazine set up a nice tutorial on how to run multiple virtual linux distros using fedora as the main OS (very nice) your CPU must have a virtual flag setting for this to work.

there are a lot of good tutorials on the net buth there is no standard set for how it should be pesented, no one can state which distro should be used ?

I am amazed at how far LINUX has come over the last 10 years and people are becoming educated about computers and are beginning to make choices.... so lets make the choice easy for them.

Last edited by dakoder; 05-18-2010 at 07:29 PM.
 
Old 05-18-2010, 08:08 PM   #26
MTK358
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Sep 2009
Posts: 6,443
Blog Entries: 3

Rep: Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721Reputation: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by dakoder View Post
I really think we should get together here and build a really good solid 'HELLO LINUX' package for beginners with step by step instructions on how to install / setup and maintain thir machine.
I don't know why but I still really like that idea.
 
Old 05-18-2010, 08:14 PM   #27
fruttenboel
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2008
Location: Tilburg NL
Distribution: Slackware 14.2 ciurrent, kernel 3.18.11
Posts: 270

Rep: Reputation: 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Hi,

I really can't associate with frustrations at the start of my computer involvement back in the sixties. I've blocked out some of that time because of that damn punch card machine. Still would have nightmares if I didn't block it.
I just *LOVED* the paper tape! A full program stored in an empty pill box.... And easy to repare too (cellotape). Try that with a DVD...
 
Old 05-18-2010, 09:26 PM   #28
michaelk
Moderator
 
Registered: Aug 2002
Posts: 16,430

Rep: Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938Reputation: 1938
IMHO could be a very ambitious project. I might suggest sticking with a desktop since existing systems already run via XP. True embedded systems add additional restrictions/problems and since the OP does not have much experience it would make things more difficult.

How much experience do you have working with electromechanical devices? Can we assume as already suggested that the computer attaches to some existing controller? If so do you have all the documentation? Does it provide any information on the command protocol? If you do not have any existing documentation then it will require some reverse engineering which may or may not be legal per your end user agreement with the software developer which may not be the device manufacture.

We still need more information on your long folder.
 
Old 05-19-2010, 08:08 AM   #29
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 12,899
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186Reputation: 2186
Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by fruttenboel View Post
I just *LOVED* the paper tape! A full program stored in an empty pill box.... And easy to repare too (cellotape). Try that with a DVD...
Paper tape was a pain! Sure easier to create than a punch card stack but both are pains as compared to solid media like a CD, DVD or even a Flash of today. I have no problem making the statement to hell with paper media.

BTW, most of my paper tape was used for bootstrapping Winchester stored programs so you could carry the boot in your pocket. The paper tape programs that were moved to storage were on reel(s) in stacks. Sure elementary programs or utilities were sometimes on small lengths but those to would be moved to storage via IPL then SPL'ed to execute.
 
Old 05-19-2010, 09:13 AM   #30
chrisbaby-nz
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 3

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I'm a mechanic engineer and have no experience with electromechanical devices
We have to types of folder but only the newest type uses a pc. All the rest use PLC that actuates the motors and rams. All controls are 24volt other than the motors which are 3phase.
The physical construction of the folder is really no problem as I have considerable experience
The first prototype will only be 2 tenth scale. But that is big enough to test the protocols.
I did consider going to Auckland university to study Mechtronics but that did not really fit in with my plans.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply

Tags
same


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
How can I write translation off programs on linux Tarzan1984 Linux - Software 1 05-17-2009 09:36 AM
hi, im new and i have no idea where to start... BerikTheMighty Linux - Newbie 4 10-06-2008 08:25 AM
Want to write your own programs but don't know how to start? Read this!!!! gvp87 Programming 15 05-20-2008 08:35 PM
how to write c programs in linux using gcc alexander_2007 Programming 2 09-16-2007 06:07 PM
IntelliJ IDEA/InstallAnywhere programs/Java filburt1 Linux - Software 0 03-17-2004 11:27 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:43 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration