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Old 12-15-2005, 05:35 AM   #1
stranger_in_rain
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Registered: Dec 2005
Location: Iran - Tehran
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Wink What disturbution to start with ?


Hi guys.

I am new here & I want to start to learn Linux, As I am studying computer engineering, I am planning to become a professional in Linux programming. I wanted you guys to help me with choosing one disturbution to start with ! Something fairly easy to handle & prepare me to get to next level, Not something like Fedora1 that had enough bugs to make me forget about linux for a while

Thanks for your help.

Shahab.
 
Old 12-15-2005, 05:42 AM   #2
speel
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I'd personally reccomend slackware but in all honesty in order to find that "perfect" distro you have to experiment with a few because what might be good for me might not be what your looking for so try a few
 
Old 12-15-2005, 06:26 AM   #3
michapma
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Don't computer engineers design computer hardware? I thought a professional Linux programmer would come from a computer science background. (nit-picking, I know)

Since your aim is to learn Linux in depth, in the long run you'd better consider using more than one distro. Probably some older distros, like Slackware and Debian, or a distro like Gentoo where you compile everything, will help get you acquainted with Linux, because you'll be doing some configuration by hand as opposed to newer, flashier distros that try to do everything for you.

In the end you need to read up on them for yourself and make a decision. You can't really decide wrong; there are lots of exciting choices. In fact, the choices are just beginning.

http://www.osnews.com/topic.php
http://distrowatch.com/
 
Old 12-15-2005, 06:59 AM   #4
rubella
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try debian... stable as hell, a lot of software available and a very good community.

when you want to be more progressive, try ubuntu (gnome) or kubuntu (kde). they are based on debian, but with unstable components.

and yes, try multiple distro's... only then, you will really appreciate your 'final' choice..
 
Old 12-15-2005, 09:06 AM   #5
pixellany
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Start with a free distro....

Take each name you see here, and post on a dart board.
Throw dart---start with the one you hit.

No matter where you start, I'd say there is an 80% certaintly you will try at least two others.
 
Old 12-15-2005, 10:48 AM   #6
onjoo
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I know everybody are always offering gentoo,slack and debian, but I think the best way to get into linux is to start with something little easyer.

My suggestions are : Suse, Mandriva and Kubuntu (Ubuntu) .

I dont know about your knowledge about other operating systems, so i would start with those, because they have easy installers and KDE as their default window manager. If you are ex-windows user KDE is the best way to linux.

I mean if you want your linux working out of box, you can pretty much forget debian,slack and gentoo. In short, those are the os choice for geeks, not desktop users. Sorry guys!

Ok debian is stable, but who cares . Its millions year behind the others, with old packages, horrible installer and poor driver support. I dont know if people still use floppies to install this thingy, but i hope you get my point. Same goes to the other two.

Ubuntu on the other hand has all the benefits from debian, but with newer packages and it is pretty much the number one linux distro at the moment. Great support for hardware, easy to use and easy to install, but it can be configured the way you want. Ubuntu uses Gnome as its default window manager, an KUBUNTU uses KDE.

Suse and Mandriva offer graphical tools for configuration, but some might say that the tools limit your work too much, but I think they are really needed for people new to linux.

If I have choose one the answer is KUBUNTU .
 
Old 12-15-2005, 11:09 AM   #7
Emerson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onjoo
... I dont know if people still use floppies to install this thingy, but i hope you get my point. Same goes to the other two.
If you don't know then you don't have the point. And Gnome and KDE are not window managers.
 
Old 12-15-2005, 11:10 AM   #8
anti.corp
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I would say Mandriva,Suse, Fedora or Debian, where Mandriva is the most userfriendly for beginners.

Have fun browsing the many flavors of Linux.
 
Old 12-15-2005, 11:44 AM   #9
Cogar
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If you did not care for Fedora, and want something easy to start with, I would recommend staying away from the more "labor intensive" distos like Slackware. It is a great distribution, but for someone transitioning into Linux, it is just about the poorest choice possible.

I agree with those who recommend Mandriva and SUSE. Red Hat, which is not too much like Fedora, actually, is also a possibility, but expensive. A desktop version costs as much as Windows XP Pro. All are easy to install and work well. Red Hat and SUSE are used quite a bit by business, and therefore getting familiar with them may help you later. Ubuntu and Kubuntu are also good, but they have some quirks (like using the sudo command for administrative tasks) that some do not care for.
 
Old 12-15-2005, 12:25 PM   #10
onjoo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerson
If you don't know then you don't have the point. And Gnome and KDE are not window managers.
Stupid me. Ok they are like graphical desktop environments and so much more ...
And for the floppy part, I know that debian is distrubuted by cds.

The more user friendly distros can be downloaded from these places:

SUSE
http://www.novell.com/products/susel...rors_isos.html

Mandriva
http://frontal2.mandriva.com/en/down...irrors/2006iso

Ubuntu
http://www.ubuntulinux.org/download/
 
Old 12-15-2005, 01:26 PM   #11
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cogar
quirks (like using the sudo command for administrative tasks) that some do not care for.
This is easy to fix.

One real attraction of Ubuntu is the way in which the business model has been set up--ie the committment to keep the SW free--pay Canonical for support if you choose to.
I use Redhat (RHEL4) at work (it's what they support), and I've used Fedora. Both get the job done, but I have never seen package management as good as what is in Ubuntu (and presumably Debian)
 
Old 12-15-2005, 01:43 PM   #12
Poetics
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I jumped in headlong into Slackware a few years ago.

Never looked back!
 
Old 12-15-2005, 04:31 PM   #13
floydking
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As a comparative 'newbie' myself I have found that 'Suse 9.3' and 'Knoppix (live disk)' are an excellent pair to work with. Suse enables you to make it as bloated, or as light as you wish, dependancies permitting of course.
Alternatively, with your future intentions in mind it may be better to use a distro where you have to think a little more. I would liken it to learning to use a camera, it's usually better to begin with an old manual camera, that way you are able to learn exactly what and why things are happening. If that's the case then I would suggest that you tried 'Debian' , especially as that's the distro so often favoured by educational establishments etc.
 
Old 12-15-2005, 04:40 PM   #14
PerfectStranger
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If you are just starting out I would definitely give SuSE a try (you can get it free from OpenSuse.org). It's a great development platform if you are interested in programming and it is simple enough to have you up and running very quickly (easy to install and you don't need to dig into all of the configuration files to run it -- of course you can if you want to).
 
Old 12-15-2005, 05:02 PM   #15
michapma
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stranger_in_rain
I want to start to learn Linux, As I am studying computer engineering, I am planning to become a professional in Linux programming.
....
Quote:
Originally Posted by onjoo
I mean if you want your linux working out of box, you can pretty much forget debian,slack and gentoo. In short, those are the os choice for geeks, not desktop users. Sorry guys!
Well, his ambition is to become a geek.


Then again, he did write this somewhat conflicting bit:
Quote:
Something fairly easy to handle & prepare me to get to next level, Not something like Fedora1 that had enough bugs to make me forget about linux for a while
I would say any of the "easier" distros would be great to start out with. Just get a distro installed so that you learn to like working with Linux. As you will want to do more, and will be forced to do more anyway by your studies, you'll get your hands dirtier and will find the so-called geek-choice distros right up your alley.

cheers
 
  


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