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Old 03-20-2004, 02:41 PM   #1
Morty500
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Question What distro can I use?


I've been using Windows for close to ten years now all the way from 3.1 to XP. I'm now wanting to get into using Linux (mainly because I'm not a big fan of Microsoft and Linux appears to have better control options) but I'm not sure what Distro I should use. I've had a play with some - Lindows, Mandrake 9.0, Redhat 8.0, Gentoo, Jamd but I'm still unsure.

What I want is a Distro that is easy enough for someone like me (a newbie that has very little coding/system admin experience and knows virtually nothing about programming) to begin using, is fully functional but something I can take full control of when I get the necessary knowledge.

I run a high performnce computer which I use for e-mail, surfing the net, art work, website maintainence and gaming.

Can anyone make a good suggestion?

Cheers.
 
Old 03-20-2004, 03:07 PM   #2
Peacedog
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for something to install i recomend mandrake, very user friendly, and imo, anyone who can set up a windows machine can get mandrake up and running fairly easily. for another option, knoppix is a cd based distro, that you can try out and see if you like it, those are just recommendations. you'll probably get 1000 different responses to this.
good luck.
 
Old 03-20-2004, 03:25 PM   #3
Morty500
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Yeah I've tried Mandrake before, easy to setup but I need something a bit more advanced - I really like Gentoo, the way it can be custom built to the computer's specs, but it's not easy when you haven't got a clue about programming and the like. I haven't tried Knoppix yet, might look into it.
Cheers.
 
Old 03-20-2004, 11:49 PM   #4
bigjohn
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the PEACEDOG's suggestion is pretty good.

Mandrake is a good learning/starter distro. The latest available, is mandrake 10 community the community bit telling you that it's a testing release. If you went for that, you may find a few things that don't work properly, but as long as once you've done the install, you sort out your connection (dial up can sometimes be a bit of a challenge - check out what your modem is, and surf for "winmodem", if it's internal), but as I say, after you sort your connection, follow the instructions in the "configure your computer" section/software manager and apply all the updates (bugfix, security and normal updates) and it should be excellent.

With gentoo, you should get the disc's (2004.0 being the latest), but then download and print off the installation guide/handbook - I can't stress this enough, read it thoroughly, and follow it vvv closely. I would suggest that if you want to try it, then follow the sections for a Stage 3 + GRP install. It's the quickest way of getting the system up and running. If you find that you have to do Stage 3 and don't use the GRP (pre compiled packages), when you do something like
Code:
emerge kde
you might want to have something else ready to do, to keep yourself occupied (like building a new garden shed or something quick, like that), because when I had to do that the first time, it took over 15 hours to complie - my connection is dsl, so the download part didn't take too long, but the emerge thing will download and then compile the packages 1 at a time.

regards

John

p.s. perhaps you could also download and print off the portage guide/handbook - it takes getting used to. But if you installed gentoo, it's very very easy to manage/maintain
 
Old 03-21-2004, 12:14 AM   #5
Kovacs
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A vote for Slackware here.
 
Old 03-21-2004, 12:20 AM   #6
sjia
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Fedora Core 1 seems to get my attention more than SuSE and Mandrake.
 
Old 03-21-2004, 12:21 AM   #7
sjia
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hmmm, what happened
 
Old 03-21-2004, 02:15 AM   #8
J.W.
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Dude - give them all a try, then decide for yourself which one best matches your preferences. A great central location for all the most popular distros is www.linuxiso.org and you can download them for free. -- J.W.
 
Old 03-21-2004, 06:04 AM   #9
kobs
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Come on... Come be a slacker!!!

http://slackware.com

you said you wanted something a little more advanced...
 
Old 03-21-2004, 06:28 AM   #10
SML
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I do not agree that Slack is more advanced.

I can get all my pieces of kit working with Slack but struggle with Mandrake and Fedora - and their excessive components.

At the end of the day, it is very much personal preference. It has taken me 12 months to decide, but I am now a Slacker.
 
Old 03-21-2004, 12:04 PM   #11
NRHBasher
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Use Red Hat 9.0
Knoppixx (STD) best for laptops
no need to format hard drive and screwup warranty.

Red Hat seems to be the most popular and will grow with you, the more you learn, the more advanced stuff it will teach you.
 
Old 03-21-2004, 02:28 PM   #12
J.W.
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NRHBasher - I agree Redhat 9 is a very good distro (I dual boot it with Slack) but in terms of having it "grow with you", that's about to become a lot more work. Are you aware that official support for Redhat 9 is scheduled to end on April 30 2004? Of course, the installation you've got will continue to work just fine as is, but dealing with security updates, will need to be done manually once RH9 hits its end of life. From http://www.redhat.com/apps/support/errata/ "Red Hat's policy for Red Hat Linux distributions is to provide maintenance for at least 12 months. Red Hat Linux 9 (Shrike) reaches end of life for errata maintenance on April 30th, 2004."

Also there's some good info here too. http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...825#post651825

Besides, as they say, if you want to learn Redhat, use Redhat, but if you want to learn Linux, use Slackware. -- J.W.
 
Old 03-21-2004, 05:19 PM   #13
kobs
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We all know slackware is the greatest distro besides (gentoo and freebsd)
 
Old 03-21-2004, 06:10 PM   #14
bluekitten
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try phlak.
www.phlak.org
 
Old 03-22-2004, 12:48 AM   #15
liamoboyle
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What? No Debian?

Debian's got a steep learning curve, but once you know what you're doing, it ends up being much more easy to maintain. Start out with something simple like redhat or knoppix, which have the easiest installs that I'm aware of, then when you want to get to the real stuff, move on
 
  


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