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Old 11-04-2009, 12:09 PM   #1
kaushalsingh
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two kernel in one operating system


I want to create a new kernel in operating system(virtual kernel) is it possible ?
that is can a virtual kernel can be created so as any operating system of any file system will be able to run other file system .

thank you
 
Old 11-04-2009, 12:35 PM   #2
pixellany
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I think what you are looking for is some kind of virtualization environment---eg Xen, Qemu, VirtualBox, etc. Once you create a virtual machine on the host, you then install an OS of your choice. (But not just a kernel---you need a complete (if minimal) OS.

a kernel by itself does not do much---it simply sets up all the data structures and waits for instructions (typically from the shell)
 
Old 11-04-2009, 12:48 PM   #3
ShadowCat8
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I'm not sure I understand exactly what you are asking. Are you talking about creating a kernel that will allow any OS to access a filesystem?

For a quick breakdown of what I know:

  1. You can create a kernel within a running linux kernel/OS.
  2. You can create a kernel for another operating system/architecture within a linux OS.
  3. You can switch to another kernel from within a running linux kernel. (Not recommended, but can be done.)
  4. You can start the running of another kernel inside a virtual space within a running linux kernel.
  5. If you start another OS/kernel inside a virtual space, you are limited by the operating system's capabilities and sometimes by the virtual environment software as to what the virtual kernel/OS can interact with.

As Pixellany said, you have many options for virtualization software, but you will likely need more than just a kernel.

I hope these answer your question.

Let us know.
 
Old 11-04-2009, 03:19 PM   #4
kaushalsingh
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thanks for the reply

pixellany you are right,
i'm confused about, it i want to create a virtual platform so that the pen drive(with any file system) inserted on any operating system can be read .
for that i read that if a new kernel is created then there it is possible to make read of any file system we want.

please explain more about it and from where to start with.

what step should i take first to start with ..
 
Old 11-05-2009, 12:17 PM   #5
ShadowCat8
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Well,

Yes, linux is able to access nearly every filesystem in existence if it has the driver compiled as a module or into the kernel. No need to necessarily go into a virtual OS unless there is another reason you need the other OS accessible there.

I would recommend starting with figuring out exactly what you want to do with the pendrive and where you are going to use it. Are you going to plug it into a Windows machine as well? A Mac? Something else?

If the pendrive is going to get plugged into a Windows machine for copying files across, then you will need to format it with a FAT32 filesystem. That way it will still be recognized and accessible from a Windows machine. I think Macs can access FAT32/VFAT filesystems, as well.

On the linux side, if your current install of linux is not already built with it, you will need to compile the new kernel with "VFAT (Windows-95) fs support". You will find that option in the menuconfig under File systems --> DOS/FAT/NT Filesystems. After you have that built and running, you just need to mount the pendrive onto your filesystem.

If the pendrive is just going between a Mac and a linux box, then you can let the Mac format the pendrive and then compile your kernel with "Apple Macintosh file system support" and "Apple Extended HFS file system support" which you find under File systems --> Miscellaneous filesystems in the menuconfig.

Now, I don't know what distro/version of linux you are running, but most distros have some documentation on building a new linux kernel. In the distro I use, Gentoo, building a new kernel specifically for your machine is a standard part of it's installation.

A pretty good tutorial on configuring and building a new kernel is at linux.com.

HTH, and if you have more questions, let us know.
 
Old 12-04-2009, 07:05 AM   #6
kaushalsingh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowCat8 View Post
Well,

Yes, linux is able to access nearly every filesystem in existence if it has the driver compiled as a module or into the kernel. No need to necessarily go into a virtual OS unless there is another reason you need the other OS accessible there.

I would recommend starting with figuring out exactly what you want to do with the pendrive and where you are going to use it. Are you going to plug it into a Windows machine as well? A Mac? Something else?

If the pendrive is going to get plugged into a Windows machine for copying files across, then you will need to format it with a FAT32 filesystem. That way it will still be recognized and accessible from a Windows machine. I think Macs can access FAT32/VFAT filesystems, as well.

On the linux side, if your current install of linux is not already built with it, you will need to compile the new kernel with "VFAT (Windows-95) fs support". You will find that option in the menuconfig under File systems --> DOS/FAT/NT Filesystems. After you have that built and running, you just need to mount the pendrive onto your filesystem.

If the pendrive is just going between a Mac and a linux box, then you can let the Mac format the pendrive and then compile your kernel with "Apple Macintosh file system support" and "Apple Extended HFS file system support" which you find under File systems --> Miscellaneous filesystems in the menuconfig.

Now, I don't know what distro/version of linux you are running, but most distros have some documentation on building a new linux kernel. In the distro I use, Gentoo, building a new kernel specifically for your machine is a standard part of it's installation.

A pretty good tutorial on configuring and building a new kernel is at linux.com.

HTH, and if you have more questions, let us know.
in simple words i just want the ext2 format to be detected on "WINDOWS".
how it is possible ?
as i think
if a kernel same as linux is installed on windows (if possible)
then any file system detected by linux can be detected by linux.
and if there is another way for it then just suggest me.
and i know that there are softwares present for windows to detect file system of linux(i.e ext2ifs) but what i'm thinking is this right or wrong?
 
Old 12-04-2009, 07:54 AM   #7
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaushalsingh View Post
in simple words i just want the ext2 format to be detected on "WINDOWS".
how it is possible ?
as i think
if a kernel same as linux is installed on windows (if possible)
then any file system detected by linux can be detected by linux.
and if there is another way for it then just suggest me.
and i know that there are softwares present for windows to detect file system of linux(i.e ext2ifs) but what i'm thinking is this right or wrong?
You are not going to be able to replace the M$ Windows kernel with compiled Linux kernel(s). You seem to be mixing apples and oranges here!

If you are aware of software that would read a 'ext2' filesystem on M$ Windows then why the query? 'GNU/Linux <> M$ <> GNU/Linux' is doable but I would look at 'GNU/Linux <> GNU/Linux <>M$' or 'GNU/Linux <> M$'.

If you want to create a VM host on a GNU/Linux that you could load a client (M$ Windows XP,Vista) then that's doable. Then the sharing would be possible.
 
Old 12-06-2009, 09:06 AM   #8
resetreset
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To make an OS read a particular partition type, you don't need 2 kernels, at least in the Linux way of doing things- merely support for both in the 1 kernel that you have.
It's been a while, but I think I distinctly remember reading ext2 drives under Windoze, so - there you go, it's not the Windoze way of doing things either.
 
Old 12-06-2009, 09:23 AM   #9
i92guboj
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I am not sure we are going anywhere in the thread.

I'd rather try to describe what exactly do you want to do without technical words (because you are mixing concepts, and making an improper use of the language, so it's very hard to guess at all what do you exactly want to do). There's no disrespect intended in my words, we all have been there at some point to a bigger or lesser extent.

Describe the situation, what OSes do you have installed, what do you exactly want to do? Please, use mundane words that you can handle well and accurately.
 
Old 12-06-2009, 03:35 PM   #10
onebuck
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Hi,

I think the OP has abandoned the thread.
 
  


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