LinuxQuestions.org
Help answer threads with 0 replies.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-23-2004, 03:42 PM   #1
Ancestral
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: 0
Some Noobie Questions


Hi,

installed Linux the first time today. Now i have some problems:

1. How can i install new programms (for example Mozilla and the Mozilla email programm ?)

2. what means the ending .tar.gz ?? can i install this ?

3. where can i see wether a program / package is installed ? For Example how can i install the Gnome Desktop Environment ??

4. i downloaded wine, it is a .rpm file, how can i install such a file ??

maybe someone can give me some noobi guide or information that i understand the working with this os some better.

Thx
Ancestral
 
Old 09-23-2004, 03:49 PM   #2
Ateo
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Long Beach, CA
Distribution: FreeBSD,Ubuntu,Gentoo,MacOS
Posts: 139

Rep: Reputation: 15
1. Depends on your distribution, but in your case you'd need to find the proper RPM files to install. I suggest going to http://rpmfind.net for they have heaps of RPMs.

2. tar is a file archiver, sort of like winzip only without compression. gz is gzip and this is what compresses a file. So if you have a *.tar.gz file you have a compressed (gzip) archive (tar).

3. This also depends on distro. Different distros install some programs to different places. To find out if Gnome is installed, check your sessions directory.

4. rpm stands for RedHat Package Manager and is the packaging system for many distos such as RedHat, Fedora and Mandrake. To install an rpm, the command is "rpm -ivh package.rpm" (without quotes).

HTH

Last edited by Ateo; 09-23-2004 at 03:50 PM.
 
Old 09-23-2004, 04:22 PM   #3
x3nos
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Morgan Hill, CA
Distribution: Gentoo 2006.1 | Ubuntu Edgy Eft
Posts: 5

Rep: Reputation: 0
First off congratulations! Don't be discouraged, soon you will be working BASH commands, running procinfo just to see how much uptime youv'e accumulated so you can brag to your friends and considering tackling that iso of Gentoo you downloaded 2 months ago . . . wait now I'm just talking about myself . . . ha ha

Anyway welcome very much and here is a good guide to rpm files.

http://www.tfug.org/helpdesk/linux/rpm.html
 
Old 09-23-2004, 04:26 PM   #4
greg108
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: CA USA
Distribution: FC2, FC4, Mandrake 10, Slackware 10, RedHat 9, Suse 9.1, College Linux, Debian Sarge, Gentoo
Posts: 170

Rep: Reputation: 30
Since there are some differeces in how distros deal with installing you have to tell us what distro you have.
 
Old 09-23-2004, 04:47 PM   #5
JustOl'Bob
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: upstate New York
Distribution: SuSE 9.0, Fedora Core 2
Posts: 117

Rep: Reputation: 19
As to installing Mozilla, or Firebird or Thunderbird - they're a snap in Linux. First download the tar.gz files involved. Make sure you notice what directory the download is going to (probably "/home/yourname"). Now, assuming that you've recently come from a Windows environment, we'll do it the GUI way....
Find the way to browse to the downloaded file and right-click on it. You should see an option to "extract here" or something similar. Once you select that, you'll find a new folder with that name. Click on that folder and inside you'll find another series of folders, one of which will also have the same name. Click on that and it will launch the application. Want the icons on your desktop to make it easier to launch? Again, it depends on your distro; you can try to drag and drop it on the desktop as a link or you might have to right-click and create a link and then drag the link to the desktop.

Okay, now the disclaimers: 1). Normally, you'll want to install your applications under /usr, not in your home directory. 2). I said Linux is a snap...unless you want Mozilla or Firefox to go to sites that have Javascript or Flash. For me, anyway, the plug-in's never automatically install. So eventually, you're going to want to go to Sun Java and Macromedia and follow their instructions to install them. That experience will be a bit involved, but an introduction to using a terminal.
 
Old 09-23-2004, 04:54 PM   #6
JustOl'Bob
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: upstate New York
Distribution: SuSE 9.0, Fedora Core 2
Posts: 117

Rep: Reputation: 19
Here's a site that helped me with the Terminal aspect of Linux:
http://linuxsurvival.com/index.php?m...ceid=1&meid=-1
Here's another one:
http://linux.org.mt/article/terminal
and still another one:
http://linuxnovice.org/

I'd also do a 'Google Search' under your distro for guides/forums, etc.
 
Old 09-23-2004, 04:55 PM   #7
Junior41180
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2003
Location: Florida
Posts: 157

Rep: Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally posted by JustOl'Bob
As to installing Mozilla, or Firebird or Thunderbird - they're a snap in Linux. First download the tar.gz files involved. Make sure you notice what directory the download is going to (probably "/home/yourname"). Now, assuming that you've recently come from a Windows environment, we'll do it the GUI way....
Find the way to browse to the downloaded file and right-click on it. You should see an option to "extract here" or something similar. Once you select that, you'll find a new folder with that name. Click on that folder and inside you'll find another series of folders, one of which will also have the same name. Click on that and it will launch the application. Want the icons on your desktop to make it easier to launch? Again, it depends on your distro; you can try to drag and drop it on the desktop as a link or you might have to right-click and create a link and then drag the link to the desktop.

Okay, now the disclaimers: 1). Normally, you'll want to install your applications under /usr, not in your home directory. 2). I said Linux is a snap...unless you want Mozilla or Firefox to go to sites that have Javascript or Flash. For me, anyway, the plug-in's never automatically install. So eventually, you're going to want to go to Sun Java and Macromedia and follow their instructions to install them. That experience will be a bit involved, but an introduction to using a terminal.
With the newest firefox, Flash is a simple click and install type thing, as it now has a auto download/install feature on certain plugins.

Java is not that hard to install if you follow instructions. So you're right, it is a good way to get used to a console. Although I did find INstalling the ATI drivers was a Task all in its own, not as easy as good ole windows, but I sucessfully installed them after a bit of troubleshooting.
 
Old 09-23-2004, 05:33 PM   #8
JustOl'Bob
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Location: upstate New York
Distribution: SuSE 9.0, Fedora Core 2
Posts: 117

Rep: Reputation: 19
Hey Junior, believe me I know your pain with drivers. I've got Nvidia, which is okay with SuSE, but a little bit of fun with Fedora Core 2. I was dealing with terms like "stop/start X" (wazzat? - where's the 'point & click'?) plus editing key files that control whether you're ever going to see your desktop again. FUN! However, after a lot of online searching and reading about everyone else's nightmares, it all went smoothly.... until the next kernel uprade and we do it again! Hey, it took me three weeks in SuSE to find Gnome. No instructions to tell a poor noob that you log out and then click on the down-arrow by KDE (probably an intelligent person would have found it in 3 minutes, not weeks). So, Linux has some gaps in general knowledge that the newbie must work through, but Windows has NOTHING that can equal these forums for information.
 
Old 09-23-2004, 05:42 PM   #9
chrism01
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Aug 2004
Location: Sydney
Distribution: Centos 6.9, Centos 7.3
Posts: 17,411

Rep: Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397Reputation: 2397
Here's a good guide: http://www.icon.co.za/~psheer/book/index.html.gz
As mentioned above, we need to know what distro you installed.
As for mozilla products, email comes built in to the Mozilla browser, or you can go with separate products: Firefox for browsing, Thunderbird for email, both from the Mozilla site (www.mozilla.org). your choice!
Just follow the instructions on the site.
Actually, most modern distros will come with a version of Mozilla built-in.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Few Noobie Questions Fedora3 Servius Linux - Newbie 3 04-28-2005 06:56 AM
Noobie Questions (Sorry) Tomlewis007 Slackware 2 03-11-2004 08:12 AM
A few noobie questions rjpa Mandriva 1 02-10-2004 08:24 AM
some very basic noobie questions! theseeker Linux - General 22 12-23-2002 07:21 AM
several noobie questions Undead Linux - General 7 09-03-2001 12:06 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:11 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration