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Old 11-02-2006, 12:54 PM   #1
V!NCENT
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So I compiled Wine...


I was pretty proud of myself to (succesfully?) compile something for the first time in my entire life.

Ok... so I was looking at a compiled version of the brand new Wine 0.9.24 that was in a map on my desktop and thought... ok what the hell do I do now?

How do I ' install' it? I'm having a really hard time switching to Linux becuase, as a Windows power-user, I have all those bad Windows habbits. Can someone explain to me what I am suppose to do now and why?

Thanks in advance.
 
Old 11-02-2006, 01:08 PM   #2
b0uncer
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Usually, but not always, compiling and installing software from source goes as follows

1) issue
Code:
./configure
in the source directory. With some packages you'll need to run autoconf or similar program first.

2) once configure successfully, I repeat, successfully finishes, issue
Code:
make
which should compile the program. If you'll want to "install" the program after this, i.e. put the files in correct directories, become root or use sudo and run
Code:
make install
Specific instructions for every single package are found in somekind of documentation file, usually - yes, README and/or INSTALL. After reading those you know how to install the software. If you didn't read them, it's your own fault -- you should

Instead of compiling programs from source it's, especially on Ubuntu, often easier to install binary (pre-compiled) packages. In your case it means using Synaptic (graphical) or apt (command-line interface);
Code:
apt-get install packagename
Synaptic is graphical and you'll probably figure it out yourself. Binary packages somehow correspond Windows installable packages, but not exactly. Their power is that most modern distributions, including Ubuntu, have package managers that not only install the binary packages but also handle removing them, updating them and automatically resolving dependencies during the installation -- it means that if package1 needs package2 and package3 to be installed before it can be installed, you can just tell the package manager to install package1, it checks out what other packages it needs, fetches and installs them all in once. Nice, eh? Drawbacks: the software might not be the very latest all the time, since somebody has to compile and create the binary packages, and distribute them, before they can be used.

But as I said, if you just compile software from source, you have a lot work, managing the updating, removing and other actions isn't too easy (it's all manual work) and in case of compilation problems you'll have to spend some time figuring out what goes wrong. And if the program depends on other programs, you'll have to manually locate them, download, compile and install them in the correct order first. This is probably the main reason why binary packages and package managers exist today, even if compiling programs could make them a bit more efficent (they could be configured and tuned for the correct platform).
 
Old 11-02-2006, 01:22 PM   #3
weibullguy
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In addition to the README and/or INSTALL b0uncer recommends you read, I would recommend a quick
Code:
./configure --help
It's often a quick way to see what optional packages you can compile against. For example, Wine doesn't require SANE or CUPS, but will build with support for SANE and CUPS if you have them. Alot of times these optional "dependencies" are auto-detected, but not always. It can save you two or three rebuilds!
 
Old 11-02-2006, 01:24 PM   #4
pixellany
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Quote:
Originally Posted by V!NCENT
I was pretty proud of myself to (succesfully?) compile something for the first time in my entire life.

Ok... so I was looking at a compiled version of the brand new Wine 0.9.24 that was in a map on my desktop and thought... ok what the hell do I do now?

How do I ' install' it? I'm having a really hard time switching to Linux becuase, as a Windows power-user, I have all those bad Windows habbits. Can someone explain to me what I am suppose to do now and why?

Thanks in advance.
If you did "make install", then it may be already ready to go. Type "wine" in a terminal and see what happens.
 
Old 11-02-2006, 01:25 PM   #5
V!NCENT
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Unhappy

I use Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft.

The reasons for not installing from the repositorys were:
-The Wine package is older (yeah Debian I know);
-There were no packages for Ubuntu 6.10 available from the WineHQ website;
-I want to learn and understand Linux, a package manager doesn't learn me anything.

I opened the console and did
Quote:
sudo -i
to get into the root terminal

Then I did
Quote:
./configure --verbose
and repeated this untill I installed all necessary packages from the Synaptic Package Manager to make sure all Wine options were available (support for ISDN, etc)

Then I did
Quote:
./configure
Then I did
Quote:
make depend && make
After that I thought I was finnished while I was not. I forgot to do
Quote:
make install
wich is stated later on in the Readme. Sorry for wasting your time
 
Old 11-02-2006, 01:26 PM   #6
josenj
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Adding to what b0uncer has written, if you want to manage software that you have compiled yourself from source a little bit easier you can use a program called "checkinstall". Their link is:

http://asic-linux.com.mx/~izto/checkinstall/

I mainly use checkinstall to create packages for me when I want the latest and greatest software. First checkinstall should be compiled and installed (for me Debian had a packaged prebuilt, I don't know if Ubuntu has one). Then for any software you install from source, you would do everything b0uncer mentioned but instead of typing "make install" you would type "checkinstall". It will do the make install part on your behave and create a *.deb file for you by default. It also hadles other package managers for those of you who uses something other then a Debian-based distro.

Then when you are ready to uninstall you can use apt to remove the program.

The link above gives a nice discription..

Good luck!
 
Old 11-02-2006, 05:21 PM   #7
V!NCENT
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Registered: Dec 2005
Location: The Netherlands
Distribution: Kubuntu 8.10 KDE4
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I did
Quote:
make install
and it all installed. I had no warnings or anything when I ran
Quote:
./configure --verbose
I opened up the console and here's what I got
Quote:
vincent@vincent-desktop:~$ wine
Segmentation fault (core dumped)
vincent@vincent-desktop:~$
1)What does this mean?
2)What did I did wrong?
3)Did I actually do anything wrong? Wine is still beta.
 
Old 11-04-2006, 05:11 AM   #8
V!NCENT
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Fixed: There is a bug/misconfiguration in Wine 0.9.24 wich causes the segmentation fault. This bug has been reported and should be fixed in Wine 0.9.25.
 
  


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