LinuxQuestions.org
Latest LQ Deal: Linux Power User Bundle
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 03-31-2014, 06:31 PM   #1
Jack Louis
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2014
Posts: 2

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Select filesysten - btrfs/ext4/fat - compatibility


Hi everyone,

I've stumbled upon the decision to which filesystem
to choose for linux (openSuSE).

Considering btrfs/ext4/fat
First two are obviously linux perfect, but I was wondering how they will react when I hook up an external HDD or USB flash which is in FAT/exFAT

What is the most compatible filesystem - given that linux will run on most...

Thanks'a bunch
 
Old 03-31-2014, 06:34 PM   #2
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,148
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853
You should either use ext4 or btrfs (depending on the version of openSuse, btrfs will be default for 13.2). FAT32 is not suitable to host a Linux system. Which filesystems you use on other media is not relevant at all, as long as it is supported by your kernel.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 06:57 PM   #3
Jack Louis
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Mar 2014
Posts: 2

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Right, so btrfs is the future - given it's features.

Question: if a user with a FAT/exFAT/NTFS formatted usb stick hooks up - will they be able to mount/read-write files - under kernel 3.12?

Again, thank you
 
Old 03-31-2014, 07:29 PM   #4
jpollard
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2012
Location: Washington DC area
Distribution: Fedora, CentOS, Slackware
Posts: 4,714

Rep: Reputation: 1280Reputation: 1280Reputation: 1280Reputation: 1280Reputation: 1280Reputation: 1280Reputation: 1280Reputation: 1280Reputation: 1280
As long as the filesystem is supported.

Most distributions have loadable modules for nearly all available filesystems. When the device is plugged in the udev service should see it, and load any drivers/filesystem modules required.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 07:44 PM   #5
salasi
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Directly above centre of the earth, UK
Distribution: SuSE, plus some hopping
Posts: 4,064

Rep: Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894
The filesystem that you use to install Linux on is essentially irrelevant to what filesystems can be used on external media. In fact there are people with particular use cases who do not use one filesystem for the total Linux install, but use different filesystems for different parts of it, and they can still use external media (not that I'm suggesting that for you - just illustrating that you are not constrained in that way).

One caution is that BTRFS is still a little 'wet behind the ears' and isn't as tried and tested as the other filesystems that you might consider. It would be wise to be a bit more conscientious than the default in ensuring that you always have backups of any vital data on BTRFS-formatted partitions, particularly if power could disappear suddenly. Otherwise, expect a lot of no sympathy when/if you do lose data...

You might even want to check SUSE's recommendations on the subject (here is a .pdf of the materials for a talk by Eckermann at Linux Con, in particular you would want to look at the flow charts on pages 17/39 - for some more basic stuff, you could look here).

OTOH, you rightly say that BTRFS is, or seems to be, the future and if you are prepared for the fact that you might be pushing the future to come to you a little faster than it might naturally want to, I can't see anything that will stop you.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 08:29 PM   #6
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Germany
Distribution: Whatever fits the task best
Posts: 17,148
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853Reputation: 4853
Quote:
Originally Posted by salasi View Post
Otherwise, expect a lot of no sympathy when/if you do lose data...
If you loose data because you don't have backups you will get no sympathy, regardless which filesystem you use.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Louis
Question: if a user with a FAT/exFAT/NTFS formatted usb stick hooks up - will they be able to mount/read-write files - under kernel 3.12?
FAT: read and write support
NTFS: read support, write support if you have ntfs-3g installed (which basically comes with any distribution or is at least available in the repositories)
exFAT: patent encumbered, so no direct support from the kernel, but some distributions have the fuse-exfat driver available, which offers read and write support.
 
Old 03-31-2014, 10:09 PM   #7
syg00
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Location: Australia
Distribution: Lots ...
Posts: 15,999

Rep: Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219Reputation: 2219
On the other hand, btrfs will give you features you may never have thought you needed - have a read of this.
I've used it for years, and the only failure I had was a RAID10 rebuild issue after I pulled one of the disks out - while running. That was early in the support. I have now moved all my photos onto a 4 disk RAID5 btrfs array - this is reasonably new feature.
 
Old 04-01-2014, 05:25 AM   #8
salasi
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2007
Location: Directly above centre of the earth, UK
Distribution: SuSE, plus some hopping
Posts: 4,064

Rep: Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894Reputation: 894
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
If you loose data because you don't have backups you will get no sympathy, regardless which filesystem you use.
While that's true, you will have done something to make data loss more likely. And still not done the sensible thing, that you should have done, even if you hadn't made data loss more likely.

I should probably have been a little clearer that I was thinking of the situation in which you had some backups, they just weren't as recent as they should have been, but the point stands.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] EXT4 vs BTRFS ReaperX7 Slackware 14 11-29-2014 04:19 PM
Home server. btrfs or LVM with ext4? martdj Linux - Server 6 01-18-2014 04:41 PM
i need to trace functions of ext4 and btrfs linuxNewbie13 Linux - Kernel 0 12-29-2013 03:45 PM
[SOLVED] [Answered!] Question about btrfs vs ext4? DTFan Linux - Newbie 9 11-20-2013 06:31 PM
ext4 vs btrfs, and with btrfs do I still need to use LVM? blue_k Linux - Software 4 08-18-2012 12:31 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:12 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration