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Old 10-15-2018, 10:19 AM   #16
rtmistler
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Does this mean that it is acceptable to install it using that second option of erasing the disk and using the entire disk for Mint?
 
Old 10-16-2018, 04:19 AM   #17
alexpaton
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Lusitano

If you don't get that screen, or something similar, then there is something wrong, possibly with the disc you are using. I've used Mint on and off since about version 6 or 7, and it has always had that screen or something similar.
 
Old 10-16-2018, 10:14 AM   #18
Habitual
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Hope this helps.
Linux Mint 19 install and demo aimed at Windows users thinking of migrating to Linux.
Includes setting up Timeshift, the Update Manager, installing applications, installing MS core fonts, and an explanation of drives in Linux.
Published on Aug 26, 2018 -

No affiliation.
 
Old 10-26-2018, 07:59 PM   #19
Lusitano
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Third trial to install Linux (failed again) - but documented

Hello,

i am so sorry that I failed again with my installation.
All what I have described in my former descriptions of
the problem occured again in the same way.

I start again from scratch here:

I boot the Linux system from my memory stick.
I double click on the "Install Linux" button.
I am asked to select the language (english).
I am asked to select the keyboard layout (german).

Then I choose

3. Install third-party software for graphics and WiFi,
Flash, MP3 and others.

Choose a password. I have done this and it was accepted.
So far no problem. But now. A new page appears. It says:

Installation type

This computer currently has Windows Boot Manager on it.
What would you like to do?

(Marked with a green OK sign) - ERASE disk and install
Linux Mint. Warning: This will delete all your programs,
Documents, photos, music and all other files.

__ Encrypt the new Linux Mint Installation for security
You will choose a security key in the next step.

__ Use LVM with the new Linux Mint installation. This
will set up logical volume management. It allows
taking snapshots and easier partition resizing.

__ Something else.
You can create or resize partitions yourself or
choose multiple partitions for Linux Mint.

I have choosen again "Something else". If I do so
the first option on the top turns from green to grey.
To my humble understanding this (Something else) is
the only way to achieve an multiple boot system.

Once "Something else" is choosen I am again confronted
with the complicated choices I canot understand.
And if I choose anything of such options I am greeted
with an error message.

I add three screen-shot images to illustrate the problem.
This feels like an "ED", an erectile dysfunction.
Meanwhile the booting of Windows 10 takes 10 minutes
and the personal pressure to get rid of windows grows
and grows for me. I stopped using planes 3 years ago
for the same reason. The security is killing my freedom
more thoroughly than this any virus ever did. Puh.

Is there any other onliine site to install Linux?

As I said in my last contribution: If I had those
dilogues which were sent to me I would have never needed
your help. I will not find out of this trap myself.

I am grateful for any help.

Lusitano
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Old 10-26-2018, 08:33 PM   #20
mrmazda
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Without starting up installation on a system configured as yours is, which I do not have, to boot the graphical Mint installer, I can only suspect your problem is that there is no existing freespace to select for installation, and you've not figured out how to create some. Your need seems to be right after choosing "something else", in your second screenshot, to select the Windows system partition sda3, and then choose change, to resize it to free space for Linux. Did you try that?

I usually tell people to, before starting to try to install Linux, to boot Windows, and use its very own resize utility to create the required freespace. If you have not yet tried to do so, I suggest you avail yourself of that option. It may not be willing to make as much as you wish, but it would at least be a start by creating some.
 
Old 10-27-2018, 09:26 PM   #21
boombaby
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Hello, Lusitano

Try this...

For now, forget installing a new setup.

1. IF you still want to keep Windows (as stated in your earlier post) then try and use the Windows formatting option to reformat all unwanted partitions to blank.

OR

2. IF you want to keep the Windows
Reboot your system with Mint disk in the DVD drive.
Choose Live (ie NOT install) to get virtual system up and running.
On the "live" system use the partition manager (GParted) to delete unwanted partitions back to blank space. [Take care not to remove your Windows partition (or the efi).]
Here, I would format the blank space and mark it as "root" (ie / ) OR you could try leaving it as blank and format it later.
Once the space is available, reboot the system and then try an install as you already tried before.

OR

3. IF you want to lose the Windows
Reboot your system with Mint disk in the DVD drive.
Choose Live (ie NOT install) to get virtual system up and running.
On the "live" system use the partition manager (GParted) to delete everything on the disk. That is, do a whole HD disk format.
Reboot with the Mint disk and install on whole disk


I feel that once you have free space made available like this the install might proceed well.

If there are still problems alexpaton might be right about your DVD disk, and it might be corrupted.

(If anyone else wants to make that process clearer then jump in. I was in a bit of a rush here.)

Regards,
boombaby
_

Last edited by boombaby; 10-27-2018 at 09:32 PM.
 
Old 10-28-2018, 02:15 AM   #22
mrmazda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boombaby View Post
2. IF you want to keep the Windows
Reboot your system with Mint disk in the DVD drive.
Choose Live (ie NOT install) to get virtual system up and running.
On the "live" system use the partition manager (GParted) to delete unwanted partitions back to blank space. [Take care not to remove your Windows partition (or the efi).]
The second image OP posted shows his Windows system partition consumes over 97% of total disk space. There aren't enough unneeded partitions to delete big enough to make adequate space for a typical Linux installation. Resizing the Windows partition is the only realistic way to proceed that keeps his existing Windows installation.
 
Old 10-28-2018, 08:03 AM   #23
boombaby
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mrmazda, you are (of course) right. So I withdraw my post - except for option (3.). Apologies.

Lusitano, if you are going to resize make sure you do a backup first. Not sure about modern Win installations, but keep your disk/id-info handy.

A long struggle over such a simple issue.

Good luck.

boombaby
_
 
Old 10-29-2018, 06:13 AM   #24
alexpaton
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According to the 2nd screenshot, there is no data on the disk, except for the Windows Boot Manager partition. The c: drive is showing as empty. I'm fairly sure that the standard Linux Mint installation is able to see data on a ntfs partition.

IF the system is full, then backing up will get Lusitano nowhere, unless he deletes files after backing up. I would suggest that the steps should be:-

1) from Windows, backup files by MOVING them to external storage.
2) use Windows to resize the c: drive (50%?)
3) reboot to usb key and see whether your options have changed.
 
Old 10-29-2018, 02:11 PM   #25
mrmazda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alexpaton View Post
According to the 2nd screenshot, there is no data on the disk, except for the Windows Boot Manager partition. The c: drive is showing as empty. I'm fairly sure that the standard Linux Mint installation is able to see data on a ntfs partition....
2) use Windows to resize the c: drive (50%?)
Given there is no data occupying the Windows system partition, he can't use Windows to resize. Nevertheless, Mint needs space to install to, which its installer's partitioner can do by selecting the Windows system partition /dev/sda3, then clicking on the change button, as the screenshot indicates. I suggest he take that route if he plans to actually install Windows. Otherwise he might as well choose erase disk.
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Old 10-30-2018, 07:56 AM   #26
alexpaton
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmazda View Post
Given there is no data occupying the Windows system partition, he can't use Windows to resize. Nevertheless, Mint needs space to install to, which its installer's partitioner can do by selecting the Windows system partition /dev/sda3, then clicking on the change button, as the screenshot indicates. I suggest he take that route if he plans to actually install Windows. Otherwise he might as well choose erase disk.
I phrased it carefully, because Lusitano says that Windows boots up slowly, and has said that he wants dual boot. He may have another hard drive in the system, which has Windows on, I suppose. Having said that, I have just checked back on this thread, and he does mention Acer Laptop, which makes a 2nd hard drive less likely.
 
Old 10-30-2018, 11:19 AM   #27
Lusitano
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Unexpcted it is, - this lively Linux-community
trying to help me to find out of this deep mess.

It may sound tiring, but my "thank you" is true.

The first answer from Mister Mazda (Oct. 27)
suggests that I lack the space on my (only) Drive C:

If this is the case or not I will leave to your judgement.
But I add a check of "Eigenschaften" to inform you.

Local Data-carrier C:
System: NTFS

Occupied Space: 225.260.451.840 -- 213 GB
Free Space: 270.199.230.464 -- 251 GB

Space Capacity: 499.460.861.952 -- 465 GB

ALL STORED EXCLUSIVELY ON >> C: << only.

I have no DVD or CD-Rom on this Acer Aspire ES1-731.

--

I will follow your instructions (Boombabys, Mr. Mazdas,
and of course, that of Mister Alex Paton) if you veterans
in the use of Linux-systems come to an agreed conclusion
to what my (Lusitanos) problem really is. - I have another
question. Is there any option in the INSTALL-procedure to
choose another website for the installation-procedure?

Or is this Mint Cinnamon installation coupled with only
this one internet-site? I remember to have received pictures
(images) of an easy looking installation procedure before
from another user in this forum who jokingly asked what my problem is.

Why is this so different? And why is the installation guide
not congruent to the real world, in this case, why is the
online-site which is supposed to manage the installation for my system
so different from the manual we all use? To which some people here
referred me to in the wrong assumption I would not have read it. -

Again, thanks to Mister Mazda Boombaby and Mr. Paton for your
empathic engagement with my installation problem.

Kind regards,

Lusitano

Last edited by Lusitano; 10-30-2018 at 11:29 AM.
 
Old 10-31-2018, 08:04 AM   #28
rtmistler
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I've sort of followed along here, and meanwhile it has also been an "off and on" thread, with Lusitano taking some time away to either consider your next steps, to work through some more challenges, or just prioritized other things.

At some point, someone noted that Acer laptops have some difficulties with secure boot and can make things difficult for the new initiate.

This laptop hard drive definitely does have space.

I just feel that you seem to be starting all the time and getting stopped all the time at the complexity of the point where you have to segment your hard drive to retain Windows and give you space for a Linux install.

Quick point is that you can install Linux using as little as 8 Gig of space, but recommend since you have over 200G to consider something like 80 or 120G, just to give yourself sufficient data room as you explore.

Meanwhile, a totally different recommendation is to consider finding another computer, laptop or desktop that is not needed for anything, and make it entirely Linux, so that you can use and play with Linux for some time without the difficulties you're experiencing.

My story about similar:
  • I've been using Linux for nearly 20 years actively as a developer. Hey, would seem to make great sense that I'd know what I'm doing, right?
  • I have a Samsung Series 9 laptop, which I got near about 2013 or so. Hey seemed great! This very slim-lined laptop, SSD (new stuff back then), W7 Professional. Etc, etc. Well, (1) I have to use Windows at work, I develop Win Forms applications as well as Linux stuff. (2) I figured dual boot, no problemo, did that on my former HP laptop.
  • Galactic backfire/fail/monkey wrench. This computer was one of the new breed with the UEFI BIOS and Linux was coming to terms with it, but also laptops were, and some still remain, difficult fits for some Linux due to the proprietary hardware from each manufacturer.
  • Eventually I got it, but not until last year and then because I finally decided to give it another go and also didn't care because I had bought a new primary laptop which was far better then my experience with that Samsung. In spite of the fact that it really is dual boot, it is now always booted into Linux and will remain so until it hits the trash pile. I will tell you that it's pretty close!! That cutesy super slim laptop has a cracked screen hinge that is too expensive to replace. Also because it was this super slim thing, absolutely no standard interfaces except USB would plug into it, I had to have helper/adapter cables for all of, wired Ethernet, HDMI video, VGA video, etc. Very slick machine, but ultimately not the right choice for me.
  • It wasn't that it was impossible, but my experience was that the BIOS settings which were recommended to be altered didn't match exactly on my machine. In fact there were some dramatic deviations, probably due to BIOS versions or something. Either case I had to "trial and error" it to get it to install and work. In the end, the solution wasn't tons of stuff, just the correct combination of settings. Meanwhile, as you have already heard, it wasn't critical to me if the system failed to be set up properly or if I had to wipe it, I now had a backup system.
Sorry for the lengthy story, but just trying to impress that if one does need to keep the essence of their system still operational, that perhaps it is best to use a non-needed system to install and learn Linux and re-visit the dual boot on a cantankerous machine, at some future point. Because this is really why all the time between 2013 and 2017 I never really put any effort into getting that system to dual boot. I had other machines, and I absolutely needed to keep my MSVC capabilities in place until I had a new development machine.
 
Old 11-05-2018, 08:37 PM   #29
Lusitano
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Hello rtmistler,

your answer remains the only one to my last explanation.

Right, it is an ON and OFF with me, since my inner
nervous system is rebellious against an overwhelming
ignorance I do not understand which is confronted with
people in this Forum who are polite and are surely experts
but in which my questions regrettably basically remained
(repeatedly) unanswered. Even if these questions were
basic and easy. (Aberration of the manual to the real
world-installation, for exmple. Or "Is there another
installation Site in the www for my Linux Mint Cinnamon installation.

That does not mean that I do not appreciate your efforts,
but I come to the conclusion that this forums answers are
not very helpfull in my case so far. That is still far
better as that what I experienced with Microsoft, which
puts me under an idiotic upgrade dictatorship and never
answered any of my mails.

You write:

At some point, someone noted that Acer laptops have some
difficulties with secure boot and can make things difficult
for the new initiate.

Yes. It was coupled with a link which ended in a 404 message.
My own search for any specific BIOS switches in my Acer
system went to nowhere. It may still be true, but I do not
believe this is really the core of the problem.

Then you write:

I just feel that you seem to be starting all the time and
getting stopped all the time at the complexity of the point
where you have to segment your hard drive to retain Windows
and give you space for a Linux install.

Yes. But I am no coward. I clicked here and I clicked there
under the SOMETHING. It all ended in an errormessage anyway.
Stupid website. I even have NO WWW Address for this installation
site. At least I could not see it. Under this circumstances
it could be as well a site of the CIA or the KGB.

You write:

Meanwhile, a totally different recommendation is to consider
finding another computer, laptop or desktop that is not needed
for anything, and make it entirely Linux, so that you can use
and play with Linux for some time without the difficulties
you're experiencing.

That is neither new nor is it a very smart remark.

"Galactic backfire/fail/monkey wrench", you write.

This is neither.

Following is an interesting biography of your experience as
Linux user and developer. Since I have 40 years of computer
experience myself that could be an interesting exchange
of stories of success and despair but it does not help momentary.

The biography ends with this:

Question solved? Mark your thread as SOLVED and explain
what solved it.

And:

"Never give up ... never surrender."
- Cmdr. Peter Quincy Taggart

Another of these stupid one-dimensional testosteron-ideas.

Why did you not tell Taggarts slogan the americans when
they left with their last helicopter from the roof of their
embassy in Saigon in 1975? Gosh.

Nothing helps. I am not motivated any more to take part
in this Forum which so far was only a big speculative bubble
of unboiled presumptions and cliches what might be or not be.

No one ever asked if my first Download of the LINUX system
(in -my- case from a german university) has to do with the
site I am later directed to in the internet - when I want
to start a full installation. No one thinks about it.

I am disappointed.

Kind regards,

Lusitano
 
Old 11-06-2018, 05:35 AM   #30
alexpaton
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Wow. That's quite some rant Lusitano. I don't think that your situation was helped, by the fact that the Linux Mint Website went down during the last couple of weeks, and was down at precisely the time that someone gave you a link to instructions on it.

One of the reasons why I haven't responded to:-

Quote:
Is there another
installation Site in the www for my Linux Mint Cinnamon installation.
and
Quote:
has to do with the
site I am later directed to in the internet
Is because I don't understand what you mean. Are you asking whether there are other places to get the ISO image of the installation media? - If so, yes there are. There is a list of mirrors on the Linux Mint website.
Are you asking whether the instructions for how to install it are somewhere else? - If so, yes there are a number of websites that show how to install Mint. Your specific situation clearly doesn't fit those pages though, as we established a while ago.

Do you really believe that you have answered all of the questions of the people who are trying to help you? The more information that you can provide, the easier it is to diagnose the problem.

I haven't figured out why your Linux Mint Cinnamon USB key shows that 0KB of space is used on your Windows partition, while you have provided details of space used, presumably from Windows. I suggested previously, that you boot up Windows, then resize the boot partition, to make room for Mint - Did you try that?

Also, just a thought, is your Windows C: Drive encrypted?
 
  


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