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Old 01-15-2014, 11:02 AM   #1
capperdog
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Question RHEL/CentOS Linux Basic Administration Training????


Hello community!
I have a long history in IT support, but my background for the last 13 years has been Windows only.
I was just made a Linux/Unix admin and currently am supporting a ROCKS cluster with more responsabilities to come. My company is supplying NO training and all of the senior admins have left the company.

I have been doing some basic training @ The Linux Acedemy by Pinehead, but I really need a boost to get all of the basics behind me and wanted to ask what this community would be recommended?

Certification training is good, but not absolutely necessary at this point. I live in Houston and would like to do live training with an instructor. The only thing I have ran across is from Hands On Technology Transfer "HOTT" that have a 5 day camp for "Linux/Unix Fundamentals" followed by a four day camp for "Linux System Administration". You must complete the first to take the second.

Could we get a good thread started here with ideas/opinions/recommendations etc? I'm sure this has been covered before, but from a search of this site on "Training" not much info directly pertaining to this particular question was found.

You help is GREATLY appreciated. I need to get up to speed ASAP!!
Capperdog

Last edited by capperdog; 01-17-2014 at 11:43 AM. Reason: Wanted to make sure this was known as a question.
 
Old 01-15-2014, 02:41 PM   #2
custangro
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From my stand point? This is a great guide...

This is for the RHCSA/RHCE ...but it also served me as a reference guide. It's good enough to study from even though you're not planning on taking the test

http://www.amazon.com/RHCSA-Linux-Ce...&keywords=RHCE
 
Old 01-15-2014, 02:53 PM   #3
capperdog
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I will be taking the tests ASAP, but what I meant in my origianl post was that studying materials or classes for taking the first test did not have to be the prioity. What I need is a hands on training solution to force feed me the essentials and it seems to be becoming an illusive one...

Thanks for the link. I will look into the training manual. I have several desk references already and good old Google, but a boot camp (I think) is what is needed.

Just FYI, I just spoke with HOTT and I cannot even take their classes unless my company pays for it...
 
Old 01-16-2014, 04:39 AM   #4
chrism01
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This is a large collection of Books/Manuals free to read online www.linuxtopia.org.
Well worth bookmarking and reading as reqd.

You might want to have a look through the Certification Forum here at LQ, as there is a lot of talk about the various courses that are available.
Ones that have an exam/Cert at the end do help to concentrate the mind

You might also want to Google for a LUG => Linux User's Group in your area for more personal contact/local recommendations.

HTH & Welcome to LQ
 
Old 01-16-2014, 06:54 AM   #5
AwesomeMachine
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There is no way to learn Linux quickly. It's like diamond mining. The people who really know what they are doing are NOT instructors. They value what they know, so they don't give it away. Most of them aren't particularly great writers or communicators, they're problem solvers. What you want to do is kind of like a five-day crash course in the history of the world!

You learn Linux by working with it. The mind can only absorb so much in a given amount of time. I could take a crash course in showering and getrting ready for work, but until I actually do it I won't really know how! There is a command called:

Code:
$ apropos keyword
which will spit out the man page titles and descriptions that contain keyword or words.

For instance:

Code:
$ apropos -a 'directory contents'
will give you somthing like this:

Code:
dir (1)              - list directory contents
ls (1)               - list directory contents
ntfsls (8)           - list directory contents on an NTFS filesystem
vdir (1)             - list directory contents
vfs_dirsort (8)      - Sort directory contents
Schools get paid as long as you are there. After you leave, they don't get anything more from you! But if they teach you everything you need to know right away, they obsolete themselves.

So here's a few commands to run through apropos:

Code:
locate
find
grep
sed
gawk (awk)
dd
cat
less
touch
mkdir
yum
bash
hostname
stty
bunzip2
chgrp
echo
ip
chmod
netstat
zcat
chown
lsmod
rm
mount
less
kill
rmdir
uname
cp
date
umount
which
bzip2
ln
ping
tail
dmesg
gunzip
mv
tar
nano
ps 
domainname
gzip
pwd
Here's how the root directory is set up:

/ virtually no files directly under root (/), only directories.

/bin-standard UNIX tools (programs)

/boot-kernels, initrd, boot loader

/dev-virtual files corresponding to hardware devices

/etc-configuration files (no programs)

/home-user created files, user configuration files

/lib-standard libraries, links to kernel modules

/media-mounted drives

/mnt-mount points (directories) for remote file systems

/opt-certain programs and packages use /opt. You just have to look in it.

/proc-virtual file system within the kernel, lists processes

/root-superuser user directory

/run-not every distro uses /run

/sbin-standard administrator programs

/srv-apache web server

/sys-virtual file sytem within the kernel, low-level hardware settings

/tmp-file system in memory, sockets, temporary files

/usr-user programs, optional administrator programs, documentation, nonstandard libraries

/var-caches, sockets, locks, logs, catalogs, system-level configuration


Now that you know that, dig in! After a few weeks you'll forget about Windows. She makes you pay for it, but she's easy! And you won't always be infected with something!

Last edited by AwesomeMachine; 01-16-2014 at 07:00 AM. Reason: I wasn't finished.
 
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Old 01-17-2014, 05:34 AM   #6
vickey83in
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Smile Use this

Right now i am also doing study for RHCE exam. While searching for online study guide i found this
RHCE 6 Study Guide
RHCE Study Guide
Use them as a start up and once you got confidence check this forum's tutorials section.
 
Old 01-17-2014, 11:36 AM   #7
capperdog
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[QUOTE=AwesomeMachine;5099059]There is no way to learn Linux quickly. It's like diamond mining. The people who really know what they are doing are NOT instructors. They value what they know, so they don't give it away. Most of them aren't particularly great writers or communicators, they're problem solvers. What you want to do is kind of like a five-day crash course in the history of the world!

Thanks man... This is exellent info. Actually better than anything I have studied thus far. The directory structure and how it is used is basic essential info that is invaluable at this point for me. That coupled with all of the oher info you supplied is greatly appreciated!!
 
Old 01-17-2014, 11:38 AM   #8
capperdog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
This is a large collection of Books/Manuals free to read online www.linuxtopia.org.
Well worth bookmarking and reading as reqd.

You might want to have a look through the Certification Forum here at LQ, as there is a lot of talk about the various courses that are available.
Ones that have an exam/Cert at the end do help to concentrate the mind

You might also want to Google for a LUG => Linux User's Group in your area for more personal contact/local recommendations.

HTH & Welcome to LQ
Also many thanks for this as well. Allot to look at!
 
Old 01-17-2014, 11:39 AM   #9
capperdog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vickey83in View Post
Right now i am also doing study for RHCE exam. While searching for online study guide i found this
RHCE 6 Study Guide
RHCE Study Guide
Use them as a start up and once you got confidence check this forum's tutorials section.
Many thanks for the links and advice!
 
Old 01-17-2014, 02:45 PM   #10
capperdog
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Awesomemachine and others... I fully understand that Linux is not learned overnight. My knowledge of the other OS did not come that way either.

I did just find out that my employer WILL pay for my certi training, so a 5 day boot camp for FREE cannot hurt. I have opened another post in the Linux-Certi section of the forum, but if anyone here can comment on "Hands On Technology Transfer" training or recommend something similar that would be great.

In the meantime there is plenty to get started on listed above.

Many Thanks for the warm welcome and all of the insight into the Linux world!
Capperdog
 
Old 01-17-2014, 05:07 PM   #11
John VV
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books will only take you so far
and not all that far

The exact same problem also exists in the Windows world

a book can only teach you just SO MUCH about the windows registry
actually hacking those HKEY_????? entries takes TIME TO LEARN
and one learns BY DOING

the one VERY BIG difference is the terminal
"cmd.exe" is garbage one needs to use *.bat files

on a real terminal ( bash,csh,zsh,...) you run the scripts in the shell

scripting will take a bit of time to get to the point of using it all the time .
 
  


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