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Old 09-14-2020, 07:28 PM   #1
4lph4
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Resources


I'm still pretty new to linux and trying to get into the networking side. I know there are plenty of tutorials for setting up servers but none really say why you're doing what they say . Is anyone aware of any resources like this?
 
Old 09-14-2020, 08:42 PM   #2
uteck
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There are plenty for setting up a web server or a media server, so it depends on the what type of server you want to set up.
 
Old 09-14-2020, 09:43 PM   #3
frankbell
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Quote:
none really say why you're doing what they say
The short answer to "why" is "because that's how they were designed."

These designs have been around for a long time and were the result of negotiation and communication among many interested parties. Many of them are addressed in RFCs.

In many cases, there were several ways to accomplish something, and, through negotiation and reasoning, one way was settled on as the standard. In many cases, several options might have worked equally well, but one was chosen to ensure interoperability across systems. Granted, there is a certain degree of arbitrariness involved. That's real life. To put it another way, it doesn't matter whether you drive on the left side of the road or the right side of the road, so long as everyone on that road drives on the correct side of the road. (As an aside, I wish pedestrians in my neighborhood would walk on the correct side of the road, but I digress.)

For example, many years ago, I was in a presentation about networking in which the presenter waxed eloquent about token ring, but token ring eventually ended up in the dustbin, replaced by ethernet, not because it didn't work, but because interoperability required a single standard, and ethernet became that standard.

You may find this site helpful: https://www.rfc-editor.org/standards

Last edited by frankbell; 09-14-2020 at 10:01 PM. Reason: clarity
 
Old 09-15-2020, 09:19 AM   #4
dugan
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The Network+ certification books are said to be good for covering how networking actually works. Is that what you're looking for?
 
Old 09-15-2020, 11:22 AM   #5
rtmistler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 4lph4 View Post
I'm still pretty new to linux and trying to get into the networking side. I know there are plenty of tutorials for setting up servers but none really say why you're doing what they say . Is anyone aware of any resources like this?
I guess I'm a little ... put off, or confused here by the question.

I've searched in the past for guides to attain things, like a media server, or a file server. And even if I were to look for not exactly those strings, if I search for something like "how do I share movies from my computer to my TV/phone?", I find plenty of guides about how to set up a media server.

As far as the quality of what I've found, it does vary, but largely I have found that many, many of the guides I've encountered do describe all aspects of things, "and beyond". Meaning that there's typically 5 or 10, or more subjects I didn't consider, didn't know about, and so forth, and these guides have taught me those additional topics. I'd also say, "to my tolerance", which is to say that I could choose to ignore those sections or explore them, and I felt there was very sufficient information for me to opt one way versus another.

Therefore I'd like to know more about what the crux of your question is here. Are you searching and finding guides where you fail to understand what they're instructing you, or failing to provide you an acceptable overview? Perhaps one example where you searched and found nothing which did help you well enough. Bear in mind, anyone can find poor advice, so I'm not asking to see a worst case, but instead something more like, "I searched for how to do <blah-blah>, and all the guides I find are inadequate."
 
Old 09-15-2020, 02:30 PM   #6
4lph4
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Originally Posted by rtmistler View Post
I guess I'm a little ... put off, or confused here by the question.
Therefore I'd like to know more about what the crux of your question is here. Are you searching and finding guides where you fail to understand what they're instructing you, or failing to provide you an acceptable overview? Perhaps one example where you searched and found nothing which did help you well enough. Bear in mind, anyone can find poor advice, so I'm not asking to see a worst case, but instead something more like, "I searched for how to do <blah-blah>, and all the guides I find are inadequate."
Pretty much when I search for "Bind tutorial" or "DNS server on Linux tutorial" The tutorial's I found are just "change this line in resolve.conf" and I guess I'm just failing to under stand what that line is and what other lines in resolve.conf (just as an example) do. I hope that makes sense. Thank you all for the replies
 
Old 09-15-2020, 07:38 PM   #7
4lph4
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Sorry didn't realize how vague my question was but I appreciate the replies. I guess the hang up is I'm not understanding what the files in the tutorials are for. Take setting up a bind server for example, the tutorials I am seeing are saying go into named.conf and change these lines but I guess I'm not understanding the why or what else can be done with these files. Maybe I am going about learning this incorrectly. I hope that clears things up.
 
Old 09-15-2020, 08:22 PM   #8
scasey
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Configuration files are where the configuration for daemons/servers/programs are stored. There is one or more for each server.

The tutorials are explaining how to configure the server.

PS I wouldn’t start with bind...but that’s just me. I long ago stopped trying to run my own name servers. It’s just too much trouble. I use my registry’s name servers as the authoritative name servers for the domains I manage, and the ISPs name servers for resolution, with googles for backup.

Last edited by scasey; 09-15-2020 at 08:29 PM.
 
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Old 09-15-2020, 09:48 PM   #9
berndbausch
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So you need the background and the conceptual understanding of networking.

There is plenty available. For DNS and LDAP, have a look at the zytrax.com books (free). You should find lots of web pages that explain TCP/IP and UDP/IP. Wikipedia often has a good overview of concepts, too, and might mention further learning resources.

One detail you should be aware of: Networking concepts are the same for Linux, UNIX, Windows, Cisco boxes, etc. The standards are not written for certain operating systems; by definition, networking is all about interoperability.

Last edited by berndbausch; 09-15-2020 at 09:52 PM.
 
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Old 09-16-2020, 08:41 AM   #10
rtmistler
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I think overall primers are good to inspect.

It would likely be helpful to do additional focused word searching, such as:
  • "explaining named.conf file"
  • "understanding named.conf file"
  • "named.conf"
That's how you do it, you ask a search engine to provide you references to that thing.

I did just type in the term "named.conf" and it seems that the first page worth of hits are explanation overviews of the file and it's purpose. The differences are the perspectives, per author.

I see one attributed to a networking for dummies page, the rest are: IBM, RedHat, and Oracle.

I feel each are worthy, but here's the networking for dummies one and my suggestion there is that you likely can find a primer for general networking knowledge if you transcend that link or site further upwards, they have a hierarchy right above the bold page title.

Here's the link I found: Network Administration: BIND named.conf and named.custom Files
 
  


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