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Old 10-24-2009, 08:09 AM   #1
roscogruen
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Reset IP address?


i'd like to change my IP address. is there a way to do this w/o contacting ISP?
the purpose is to revisit sites that only allow so many downloads or visits.

thanks.
 
Old 10-24-2009, 08:39 AM   #2
jomen
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Reset (or unplug) your router or modem (by that I mean, dis/reconnect the power, not the network-cable).
But it will probably get the same IP assigned than it had before and will therefore not help.

Next alternative: just wait for that timeout or pay for the service - I know it happens on the freely accessible versions of rapidshare services for instance - and the restriction will be gone if you subscribe and pay...

Last edited by jomen; 10-24-2009 at 08:54 AM.
 
Old 10-24-2009, 12:22 PM   #3
DavidMcCann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jomen View Post
Reset (or unplug) your router or modem (by that I mean, dis/reconnect the power, not the network-cable).
But it will probably get the same IP assigned than it had before and will therefore not help.
This should work. The ISP recycles your address when you disconnect, so it just needs someone-else to switch on their computer between your switching off and switching on again. In other, words go and make a cup of tea!
 
Old 10-24-2009, 12:44 PM   #4
gregorian
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidMcCann View Post
This should work. The ISP recycles your address when you disconnect, so it just needs someone-else to switch on their computer between your switching off and switching on again. In other, words go and make a cup of tea!
This is not necessarily true. I always get the same IP and I don't have static addressing. The IP changes every time I spoof my MAC address, but I always get one IP for one MAC address.

Try dhcpcd -s <enter a new ip> <interface>

Obviously the new IP you desire shouldn't be in use. This entire argument holds only if you aren't using static addressing.

Last edited by gregorian; 10-24-2009 at 12:45 PM.
 
Old 10-24-2009, 12:54 PM   #5
jomen
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there might be a clue in what gregorian said:
some/most routers (if you have one) allow you to do just that:
change the MAC-address

I don't know about modems for DSL or such - never had one.

It is a bit of work though to do that time and time again...
The cup of tea might be easier
 
Old 10-24-2009, 09:03 PM   #6
chrism01
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When ISPs setup dynamic addresses, they typically give them very long timeouts for DSL users. Actually disconnecting the power and taking a break may encourage someone else to pick it up. Try it at the local 'net rush-hour' time.
Resetting the MAC should do it also, for obvious reasons.
 
Old 10-25-2009, 04:16 AM   #7
roscogruen
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Lightbulb resetting IP Address

Resetting the MAC should do it also, for obvious reasons.[/QUOTE]

i don't know about disconnecting power to modem.

here is how to do it for an ATT modem/account:

$ sudo apt-get install Macchanger
or do it from synaptic
$ sudo apt-get install nmap
or do it from synaptic
$ sudo ifconfig
in first lines of output you'll find:
eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:1a:a0:2d:7b:b5
inet addr:192.168.1.64 Bcast:192.168.1.255



$ sudo nmap -sP 192.168.1.0/24
Starting Nmap 4.76 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2009-10-24 09:04 CDT
Host rosco-desktop (192.168.1.64) appears to be up.
Host home (192.168.1.254) appears to be up.
MAC Address: 00:25:3C:BF:E0:69 (Unknown)
Nmap done: 256 IP addresses (2 hosts up) scanned in 5.56 seconds

Type “host home” in firefox address bar: 192.168.1.254
this will give the system summary of your att internet connection.
In “Broadband Link” Section
Click “Summary”

click “Advanced Settings”

you will see a section on left side, “Hardware Address Override.”
Click Substitute new numbers (0-9) or letters (a-f) in last six digits.

make sure you see that i used my IP address & hardware address above. you'll need to get yours in the terminal output. good luck for those who try. i got my help from my LUG

Last edited by roscogruen; 10-25-2009 at 04:21 AM.
 
Old 10-25-2009, 04:51 AM   #8
jomen
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sorry - my answer was completely beside the point and thus deleted

Last edited by jomen; 10-25-2009 at 04:59 AM.
 
Old 10-25-2009, 11:40 AM   #9
gregorian
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If you want to change your mac, there's a much simpler way. Example:
sudo ifconfig wlan0 hw ether addr 00:ef:23:d3:23:34
 
Old 10-25-2009, 11:53 AM   #10
jomen
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gregorian
that was the mistake I made with my answer and why I deleted it

It is not this MAC which needs to be changed - the MAC of the router, of the outside interface facing the provider, is...

The description is a complicated way to show how to find out the IP of, and log into, the router and change the MAC of the interface facing the provider.

Last edited by jomen; 10-25-2009 at 11:56 AM.
 
Old 10-26-2009, 10:45 AM   #11
gregorian
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Why does the MAC of the router need to change? I'm not sure I understand. The websites that block a computer after a certain number of attempts do so by recording the IP. If changing your own MAC gives you a new IP, doesn't that solve the problem? It works for me; also I cannot change the MAC of my college's wireless access point.
 
Old 10-26-2009, 11:14 AM   #12
jomen
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Because the routers MAC is what is seen from the outside by your provider - not that of a client 3 interfaces down the chain.
I suppose we are talking about a home user, a DSL (or similar) provider and one or more computers behind the NAT, that the router uses to share the one single IP the provider gives to the user.
From the outside, all computers connected to the routers internal LAN are seen as one computer from the WAN side.

The IP the router is given (may) depend(s) on the MAC of it's WAN interface - or it may not.
If it does not, cutting the power/resetting will get you a new IP from the provider.
If it does, you get the same as before - and changing MAC could "force" another.

I can't think of a way to make it dependent on the MAC of a client that is on a different interface.
means: I can't imagine how this could work for you - if you and your college are on the same LAN which is NAT-ed through one WAN IP
A MAC is only visible from one interface to the next.

Last edited by jomen; 10-26-2009 at 11:20 AM.
 
Old 10-26-2009, 11:50 AM   #13
lhorace
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Also look into tor, that would probably be the easiest and ip changes almost on every request
 
Old 10-26-2009, 11:57 AM   #14
teebones
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it all depends on the connection specifics..

E.g is it bridged? or is it PPOE or PPOA?
(dsl speaking)

Furthermore, the Poster didn't say, it has dynamic IP leases at all.

Most DSL providers (at least here in Europe), use static addressing, because of the clear administration for the customers.
(one customer equals one IP, thus backtracing is easier, for quanty of traffic limits and also for legal actions)

It's done by Cable loopback addressing (DSLAM), a telephone connection (with or without actual telephone signal, is addressed to a specific physical postal address. Thus nomatter what your mac is, you allways get the same IP. (unless you have a ip block addressed, but that's mostly not the case for soho connections)

But then again, the poster didn't say it is using a DSL connection.. maybe it's wireless (village wlan), maybe it's fiber, maybe it's cable.. or maybe it's dailup. we don't know..


To the OP: please specify your connection type and provider (or which package you have).

Last edited by teebones; 10-26-2009 at 12:01 PM.
 
Old 10-26-2009, 12:06 PM   #15
mrrangerman
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Quote:
jomen

The IP the router is given (may) depend(s) on the MAC of it's WAN interface - or it may not.
If it does not, cutting the power/resetting will get you a new IP from the provider.
If it does, you get the same as before - and changing MAC could "force" another.
The ISP could care less about the router, the IP address is given to the modem the customer is using, and that all depends on the MAC of the modem. The modem be it cable/dsl can not be changed unless the new MAC is registered with the ISP as a valid customer device. Other wise anyone could run down to the local radioshack buy a modem and jump on any ISP's network and not have to pay a dime for the service.
 
  


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