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-   -   Recommendations please? (https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-newbie-8/recommendations-please-792259/)

MTK358 03-02-2010 07:27 AM

Why would you want to run a Linux server in Windows?

It's not a Linux server then!

An as for what distro to use, GET ONE WITH A GOOD PACKAGE MANAGER.

That way, you never have to deal with manually installing software and figuring out dependencies. And also, you can update every single program in your OS with one command!

Debian-based distros (this includes Ubuntu) have "apt-get".

RedHat-based distros (this includes Fedora) have "yum".

Personally I think Arch Linux's "pacman" package manager is way better than any of these, but a fresh Arch install is definitely not newbie-friendly.

Note that Arch's repositories have some common non-open source software like Flash and media codecs, that almost everyone installs anyway, so I like the fact that Arch made it easy.

Installing Flash and media codecs can be a huge pain in most distros.

And also be sure to see linuxcommand.org (in my sig).

TheIndependentAquarius 03-02-2010 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shimonbenyaakov
Not Found
The file you were looking for was not found.
To find what you are looking for, you should try these links:
Mozilla Firefox
Mozilla Thunderbird
Other products...

This from the link.
???

I have modified the link in my previous post, see that once again !

shimonbenyaakov 03-02-2010 07:29 AM

Are too many questions in the same thread a bad thing, or do I need to try to bounce around several threads to look for answers? My search queries rarely lead me to the specific answers that I look for.

MTK358 03-02-2010 07:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shimonbenyaakov (Post 3882380)
Are too many questions in the same thread a bad thing

Yes.

JimBrewster 03-02-2010 07:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shimonbenyaakov (Post 3882350)
Am I asking too many questions?

LOL! :)

The answer is yes, no, and maybe...

Seriously, though, I suggest you take a deep breath and curb the understandable impulse to try everything at the same time!

Then I'd suggest continuing to read the rute Linux guide, but don't get too bogged down in the details until you have some more hands-on experience.

And to that end, I'd suggest a LiveCD distro like *buntu or KNOPPIX (comprehensive desktop environment) Puppy (nice and light but still pretty rich) or SliTaz (tiny but functional). It will boot into a nice familiar desktop with menus, but you can also open a terminal program and practice commands. You can get familiar with Linux without committing your hardware.

The LiveCD distros are also ideal for playing in QEMU or VirtualBox if you don't want to reboot your Windows system.

Once you're familiar with the environment you can start thinking about repartitioning your hard drive for a full-blown installation.

Just my $.02...

TheIndependentAquarius 03-02-2010 07:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shimonbenyaakov
Are too many questions in the same thread a bad thing

No not a bad thing, but many people will not be able to see all the questions as people generally tend to guess the thread topic by its title !

Quote:

Originally Posted by shimonbenyaakov
or do I need to try to bounce around several threads to look for answers?

You can bounce a thread if its not more than 6 months old, if it is, better start your new thread.

Quote:

Originally Posted by shimonbenyaakov
My search queries rarely lead me to the specific answers that I look for.

That firefox questions has been discussed before, you could have searched that :)

shimonbenyaakov 03-02-2010 07:33 AM

shimonbenyaakov@andLinux:~$ tar -xf firefox-3.5.7.tar.bz2
tar: firefox-3.5.7.tar.bz2: Cannot open: No such file or directory
tar: Error is not recoverable: exiting now
shimonbenyaakov@andLinux:~$


I downloaded it to Home, but the above happened to me. Am I doing something wrong here?

shimonbenyaakov 03-02-2010 07:35 AM

Home showed 2 folders, so I backed up to Home without selecting anything in Home, and downloaded.

TheIndependentAquarius 03-02-2010 07:36 AM

Quote:

shimonbenyaakov@andLinux:~$ tar -xf firefox-3.5.7.tar.bz2
tar: firefox-3.5.7.tar.bz2: Cannot open: No such file or directory
tar: Error is not recoverable: exiting now
shimonbenyaakov@andLinux:~$
Oh I am extremely sorry,

Try this:
Code:

tar -xf firefox-3.6.tar.bz2

shimonbenyaakov 03-02-2010 07:39 AM

shimonbenyaakov@andLinux:~$ tar -xf firefox-3.6.tar.bz2
tar: bzip2: Cannot exec: No such file or directory
tar: Error is not recoverable: exiting now
tar: Child returned status 2
tar: Error exit delayed from previous errors
shimonbenyaakov@andLinux:~$


This old thing again. My Linux does not seem to enjoy my company.

TheIndependentAquarius 03-02-2010 07:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shimonbenyaakov
shimonbenyaakov@andLinux:~$ tar -xf firefox-3.6.tar.bz2
tar: bzip2: Cannot exec: No such file or directory
tar: Error is not recoverable: exiting now
tar: Child returned status 2
tar: Error exit delayed from previous errors
shimonbenyaakov@andLinux:~$

Do
Code:

ll
on your home folder prompt and post the output here !

JimBrewster 03-02-2010 07:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shimonbenyaakov (Post 3882389)
Home showed 2 folders, so I backed up to Home without selecting anything in Home, and downloaded.

A normal user shouldn't be able to write to /home. Your home directory should be /home/<username>/. Find where the downloaded file is and change to that directory.

But if you're running some form of Ubuntu, shouldn't you be doing something like:
Code:

sudo apt-get install firefox

MTK358 03-02-2010 07:42 AM

If you used a package manager:

Code:

Debian:

apt-get install firefox

RedHat:

yum install firefox

Arch:

pacman -S firefox

Done!

shimonbenyaakov 03-02-2010 07:43 AM

Do ll on your home folder prompt and post the output here !

What does this mean? Is this a symbol, two # 1's, two L's, or something else? Sorry for my ignorance.

MTK358 03-02-2010 07:44 AM

Code:

ls -l
ll usually just means "ls -l" but some distros (like Arch) don't support it.


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