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Old 05-09-2018, 04:34 PM   #1
freezeframer
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Re: Inflexible disk partitioning with CentOS 7 installation


Could someone explain the reason why the CentOS 7 DVD ISO installation is so inflexible with regard to disk partitioning. 1.) It won't allow me to use partitions previously created - i.e. before initiating the OS installation. and 2.) The installation routine does not allow me to create dedicated partitions for /usr and /tmp. It places /usr in the same partition as root preventing me from securing it with read-only access. And it also places /tmp on the same partition as root making it necessary to move it after the installation, which is an unnecessary pain.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 11:08 PM   #2
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freezeframer View Post
Could someone explain the reason why the CentOS 7 DVD ISO installation is so inflexible with regard to disk partitioning. 1.) It won't allow me to use partitions previously created - i.e. before initiating the OS installation. and 2.) The installation routine does not allow me to create dedicated partitions for /usr and /tmp. It places /usr in the same partition as root preventing me from securing it with read-only access. And it also places /tmp on the same partition as root making it necessary to move it after the installation, which is an unnecessary pain.
I'm not sure why you say that, as you should be able to create such partitions with anaconda (the installation program for CentOS).

It should be the same process as creating any other type of partition. You can also use GPT partitioning instead of MBR based partitioning or vice versa.

You have to do your own 'custom' partitioning in anaconda, if you want different to the defaults.

You should explain exactly what you have tried doing and exactly what happened when you tried doing it or didn't happen that should have.
 
Old 05-09-2018, 11:39 PM   #3
Honest Abe
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I am not sure if you want to do some heavy reading, but if you do , this should help. (Opens PDF)

Also, if you absolutely want to, u may create separate partitions for /usr and/or /tmp , copy the files over (cp -pR) and make an entry in /etc/fstab.

Furthermore, you can define whatever partitions you want if you use kickstart. A simple web search should help, and thisis a good place to start.

Hope it helps.
 
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Old 05-10-2018, 12:47 AM   #4
syg00
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Inflexible might be debatable - how about arcane, perverse, counter-intuitive, frustrating ...
Just bloody lame.

Maybe it works on a large farm, but on a home system I found Centos 7 a right PITA. I eventually got it kicked into shape, but I soon deleted it as it formatted default as XFS. I didn't bother re-doing it.
 
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Old 05-10-2018, 08:23 AM   #5
_roman_
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Well when you want to customize linux, use something proper like gentoo linux.

That installer discs are stupid is a well known fact in my point of view.

I tried to change away from gentoo for some reaons.

slackware installer is limited, tried around last xmas.
freebsd same, would not even boot the finished laptop, with dated consumer hardware, nothing fancy. Just uefi issue according to some guy.

same for those ubuntu / linux mint isos over many years.

In short those binary distros are made for guys who do not want to learn. Are not interested in the basics. So the installer is made just to accept everything in a straight line. Well this behaviour is the same for Spyware 2000, Spyware NT, and some other Spyware operating systems. Spyware 10, I isntalled it twice with iso downloaded from spyware, has the same issues.

It is also obvious that some distros, including mint copy spyware policy on how to design user interfaces and installations. so when you see it in a spyware installer disc since spyware 2000, you see it in those newbie distros too.

--

A proper distro offer flexibility, customizations and choice

--

I also downlaoded centos in past two years once, and did a test installation.

The redhat i used ages ago, had a much better software quality

Last edited by _roman_; 05-10-2018 at 08:24 AM.
 
Old 05-10-2018, 08:54 AM   #6
syg00
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Do we have to get this same rant every time you post ?.
 
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Old 05-10-2018, 11:56 AM   #7
DavidMcCann
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freezeframer View Post
Could someone explain the reason why the CentOS 7 DVD ISO installation is so inflexible with regard to disk partitioning.
It's not inflexible, just difficult! It's difficult because of the enormous variety of options available. I would never use that installer without reading the documentation (yet again) and making notes.

If you read the documentation, you'll see that you can control the use of partitions.
Do your partitioning in advance of the installation, using gparted from a live medium.

You obviously need /home separate and having /var separate is useful on a database server, but that's it. See some comments from professionals on /usr and /tmp here:
http://unix.stackexchange.com/questi...ent-partitions
 
Old 05-10-2018, 01:54 PM   #8
rknichols
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freezeframer View Post
It places /usr in the same partition as root preventing me from securing it with read-only access.
A separate /usr partition has been broken to a steadily increasing degree for the last 10 years (since the release of Fedora 10 in 2008). In the past you could get away with it as long as you had no boot-critical hardware that needed udev rules in /usr for detection. Now, systemd has delivered a final blow to that configuration. Yes, there's still a way to hack a solution, but you have to modify the initrd to mount /usr early so that it's available when systemd takes control of the boot sequence. Having /usr already mounted when the automatic fs checks are done means that the fsck of /usr will always fail, so you also have to disable that check in /etc/fstab.

It is no surprise that the installer does not support such a configuration.

Last edited by rknichols; 05-10-2018 at 06:02 PM. Reason: typo
 
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Old 05-10-2018, 04:08 PM   #9
jefro
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Maybe I missed something with the installer. Thought you had the choice to manually create partitions or automatically create them? https://techencyclopedia.wordpress.c...ux-partitions/

I will have to admit that some distros will make it difficult to write over existing linux partitions I suppose as a way to prevent disaster. In some cases you even have to delete partitions and stop installer and reboot.
 
Old 05-10-2018, 07:32 PM   #10
AwesomeMachine
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I think you just choose the option 'create custom layout' in anaconda (disk druid). Then you can customize the partition setup and file formats. I don't understand what is so difficult.
 
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Old 05-10-2018, 07:48 PM   #11
Ztcoracat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
Maybe I missed something with the installer. Thought you had the choice to manually create partitions or automatically create them? https://techencyclopedia.wordpress.c...ux-partitions/

I will have to admit that some distros will make it difficult to write over existing linux partitions I suppose as a way to prevent disaster. In some cases you even have to delete partitions and stop installer and reboot.
No, you haven't missed anything with the installer.

I've installed Centos many times and anaconda does present you with a chance to manually create partitions if you want to but you have to find it in the Menu.

OP should be able to create a /boot, /root, /home and swap partition with ease. Deleting the old partitions first of course.

Code:
I will have to admit that some distros will make it difficult to write over existing linux partitions
As this has been the case for me as well with Fedora. To solve that issue manual partitioning works for the fresh install.
 
Old 05-10-2018, 08:06 PM   #12
freezeframer
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My bad. I just reinstalled CentOS 7 from the ISO DVD. After selecting manual partitioning, each time a partition is added (by hitting the "plus" button) a mini menu requesting the mount point and the desired partition size is displayed. The mount point selection is a drop down menu that only includes the following selections: /, /boot, swap, /var and /home. /usr and tmp are not presented in the menu. But a custom mount point can be entered. During my first installation attempt I tried to manually enter the mount point but it didn't take. So I assumed it didn't allow a manual entry. During my second installation attempt it took. Don't know what I did the first time that caused it to not be accepted. Thanks for all the responses. They included much other food for thought. BTW I installed /user on its own partition. I guess I will find out if it breaks.

Last edited by freezeframer; 05-10-2018 at 08:07 PM. Reason: added thought
 
Old 05-10-2018, 08:38 PM   #13
Ztcoracat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by freezeframer View Post
My bad. I just reinstalled CentOS 7 from the ISO DVD. After selecting manual partitioning, each time a partition is added (by hitting the "plus" button) a mini menu requesting the mount point and the desired partition size is displayed. The mount point selection is a drop down menu that only includes the following selections: /, /boot, swap, /var and /home. /usr and tmp are not presented in the menu. But a custom mount point can be entered. During my first installation attempt I tried to manually enter the mount point but it didn't take. So I assumed it didn't allow a manual entry. During my second installation attempt it took. Don't know what I did the first time that caused it to not be accepted. Thanks for all the responses. They included much other food for thought. BTW I installed /user on its own partition. I guess I will find out if it breaks.
Congrads on a successful install.

If you read up on the package management system and how it works nothing should break.

I encourage you to read the documentation:-

https://wiki.centos.org/TipsAndTricks
https://wiki.centos.org/HowTos
 
  


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