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Old 04-08-2016, 09:42 AM   #46
yancek
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So I know I want to just install stuff with this USB flash drive. But I've read about 'one off' installations, so my question is 'can I use this USB flash drive to do another installation?'
That's what it is designed to do, from the mkusb page linked above "Cloning an iso file to a mass storage device makes a boot drive, provided it is a hybrid iso file" so when you boot the flash drive with Xubuntu on it you should see an install icon on the Desktop. So it is the same as having a Live CD or a Live DVD. The 'Live' in this case meaning read-only and no changes saved on reboot unless you also created persistence which you say you did not.

Quote:
And btw on another OS I was trying to install I discovered it didn't pass the md5sum integrity test.
Delete the iso file and don't use it.
 
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Old 04-08-2016, 11:35 AM   #47
beachboy2
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Gregg,

Yet another option for Linux installations via a bootable USB drive is listed here (Universal USB Installer) at post #37:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...67#post5528167
 
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Old 04-08-2016, 12:05 PM   #48
RockDoctor
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gregg Bell View Post
In this case I did NOT install. I just did the testing thing. But does that matter one way or another in terms of being able to use the USB flash drive for another installation?
It does not matter. You're not going to change anything on the flash drive. You can boot from it multiple times. You can install from it multiple time (and, I often do just that). Anything you might download and/or change when using the live USB is saved in a temporary filesystem in memory that disappears when you turn off the power or reboot.
 
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Old 04-08-2016, 12:09 PM   #49
erik2282
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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_CD
 
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Old 04-08-2016, 08:24 PM   #50
jefro
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There tends to be two ways to use a usb. One is to have it basically act as a cd/dvd to install to a system. The other way is to use a usb as if it were an internal hard drive. You don't usually have an installer program on a normal install but you can call it up from some distro's.
 
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Old 04-08-2016, 11:54 PM   #51
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yancek View Post
That's what it is designed to do, from the mkusb page linked above "Cloning an iso file to a mass storage device makes a boot drive, provided it is a hybrid iso file" so when you boot the flash drive with Xubuntu on it you should see an install icon on the Desktop. So it is the same as having a Live CD or a Live DVD. The 'Live' in this case meaning read-only and no changes saved on reboot unless you also created persistence which you say you did not.
Cool. Good explanation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yancek View Post

Delete the iso file and don't use it.
I won't. Thanks!
 
Old 04-08-2016, 11:57 PM   #52
Gregg Bell
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Originally Posted by beachboy2 View Post
Gregg,

Yet another option for Linux installations via a bootable USB drive is listed here (Universal USB Installer) at post #37:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...67#post5528167
Thanks a lot, beachboy2. I always wondered how that Universal Installer worked. I bookmarked that link for future reference.
 
Old 04-08-2016, 11:58 PM   #53
Gregg Bell
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Originally Posted by RockDoctor View Post
It does not matter. You're not going to change anything on the flash drive. You can boot from it multiple times. You can install from it multiple time (and, I often do just that). Anything you might download and/or change when using the live USB is saved in a temporary filesystem in memory that disappears when you turn off the power or reboot.
Wow. Good, I'm glad. That sounds very efficient. Thanks.
 
Old 04-09-2016, 12:06 AM   #54
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by erik2282 View Post
Thanks a lot, Erik. That's a really good (I bookmarked it) explanation of a live bootable device. (As opposed to the persistent.) I'm finally getting this stuff! Ha ha.

P.S. On that DD experiment I did, I know the drives seemed to be reversed but they weren't. And when the process was done, I didn't see anything on the target drive, BUT after I did the MKUSB process it showed that that drive was empty also. Further investigation via Gparted showed that the drive was "hidden." I think the DD experiment may have had the same effect--and the USB drive may have been bootable.
 
Old 04-09-2016, 12:10 AM   #55
Gregg Bell
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Originally Posted by jefro View Post
There tends to be two ways to use a usb. One is to have it basically act as a cd/dvd to install to a system. The other way is to use a usb as if it were an internal hard drive. You don't usually have an installer program on a normal install but you can call it up from some distro's.
Thanks jefro. So a "live" bootable USB flash drive can be both (both a way to install the system and as an internal hard drive, that is), right? (In other words, a "live" bootable USB flash drive will be an internal hard drive, but it may or may not have the installer included, right?)
 
Old 04-09-2016, 08:41 AM   #56
yancek
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Thanks jefro. So a "live" bootable USB flash drive can be both (both a way to install the system and as an internal hard drive, that is
No. I've never seen a usb port inside a computer. What he is trying to say is that a flash drive can be used exclusively to store data and/or as a Live CD. If it is a Live CD on the flash drive, these programs which create that overwrite the entire flash and unless you know how to change this, the rest of the flash drive is useless to you.

Pretty much any Linux Live CD will have an installer on it or a method to install. That's the whole point, test it and if you like it install. And it is very rare to have an already installed system have an installer when it is already installed. That would be pointless unless you were trying to remaster something to include the installer.

The term 'live cd' means specifically that nothing is saved on reboot. You can't write to the filesystem and save any changes on reboot.
 
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Old 04-09-2016, 06:46 PM   #57
jefro
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"(both a way to install the system and as an internal hard drive, that is)"
A usb drive is a storage media.

A usb can be used just like any internal hard drive install. A modern computer and distro doesn't know the difference between an internal drive and a usb drive usually.
(In actuality a usb and ide/sata/scsi are all internal connections of the motherboard electrically. Internal usb headers are on many boards. That is not the issue here with your question.)

OK, "live" is a phrase that has no technical meaning. In linux we started hearing a live cd that Klaus Knopper may have coined with his Knoppix cd's. They have evolved a bit and tricks like placing the build on a usb has gone a long way. So you could have a usb drive that holds an exact copy of a live cd image, or it could hold a modified copy of a live image. Those could hold added features like persistence. This type of install tends to lock various parts of linux as the original iso image can't be fully modified. You can use these (if they are installers to begin with) as an install tool. Some live images are not meant for installing and can't be used to properly install to another system. Like Gentoo live or older Knoppix/DSL type iso's.

A usb can hold a true install. From that install you could generally call up an installer to be used for other media.

Last edited by jefro; 04-09-2016 at 06:48 PM.
 
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Old 04-09-2016, 07:06 PM   #58
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yancek View Post
No. I've never seen a usb port inside a computer. What he is trying to say is that a flash drive can be used exclusively to store data and/or as a Live CD. If it is a Live CD on the flash drive, these programs which create that overwrite the entire flash and unless you know how to change this, the rest of the flash drive is useless to you.

Pretty much any Linux Live CD will have an installer on it or a method to install. That's the whole point, test it and if you like it install. And it is very rare to have an already installed system have an installer when it is already installed. That would be pointless unless you were trying to remaster something to include the installer.

The term 'live cd' means specifically that nothing is saved on reboot. You can't write to the filesystem and save any changes on reboot.
Okay, thanks, yancek. That was helpful.
 
Old 04-09-2016, 07:09 PM   #59
Gregg Bell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
"(both a way to install the system and as an internal hard drive, that is)"
A usb drive is a storage media.

A usb can be used just like any internal hard drive install. A modern computer and distro doesn't know the difference between an internal drive and a usb drive usually.
(In actuality a usb and ide/sata/scsi are all internal connections of the motherboard electrically. Internal usb headers are on many boards. That is not the issue here with your question.)

OK, "live" is a phrase that has no technical meaning. In linux we started hearing a live cd that Klaus Knopper may have coined with his Knoppix cd's. They have evolved a bit and tricks like placing the build on a usb has gone a long way. So you could have a usb drive that holds an exact copy of a live cd image, or it could hold a modified copy of a live image. Those could hold added features like persistence. This type of install tends to lock various parts of linux as the original iso image can't be fully modified. You can use these (if they are installers to begin with) as an install tool. Some live images are not meant for installing and can't be used to properly install to another system. Like Gentoo live or older Knoppix/DSL type iso's.

A usb can hold a true install. From that install you could generally call up an installer to be used for other media.
Code:
OK, "live" is a phrase that has no technical meaning.
Thanks jefro. That helps because the term "live" is kind of confusing. (I'm getting it little by little.)
 
  


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