LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-09-2006, 11:14 PM   #1
Linux_BSD_Unix
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Posts: 19

Rep: Reputation: 0
Smile Questions


Hello,

I'm new to linux and am wanting to learn more. Once I get more RAM in my PC I'll be installing Ubuntu, but aside that I have a few questions.

1. Where is a good website with Linux information about the enitre system, how it works beneath the cover and why? (I need to learn about what amkes up Linux and what does what, etc....)

2. Could I run Xubuntu on my PC, it won't run Ubuntu, cuz I only have 128 MB of RAM. I've heard Xubuntu is smaller, could it possibly isntall?

3. Can anyone point me to a good free web host so i can start up my dev. website for linux/information/programming. I want to start up my site to post my programs I code and everything.


Thanks!
 
Old 09-09-2006, 11:46 PM   #2
BiThian
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Romania
Distribution: NetBSD 3.1
Posts: 118

Rep: Reputation: 15
1) Well, I think you should read first these docs:
http://linux.oneandoneis2.org/LNW.htm
http://www.michaelhorowitz.com/Linux.vs.Windows.html
http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/DOS-Win-to-Linux-HOWTO.html
Then:
www.tldp.org
http://www.linux-tutorial.info/
www.google.com/linux
2)If you really want some ubuntu stuff, then you should try flubuntu - it should consume less resources, because it uses fluxbox (I don't know if it was released yet).
This is what I found googling for Xubuntu requirements:
Quote:
=== Recommended Minimum Requirements ==

To run the Desktop CD at lest 128 megabytes of RAM are required. To use the installed system at least 64 megabytes of RAM is required but 128 is recommended. At least 1.4 gigabytes of disk space is required.
 
Old 09-10-2006, 12:19 AM   #3
Linux_BSD_Unix
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Posts: 19

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
I think I'll give Xubuntu a try.

Also can one make a simple new distro, just by changing the names, logos, colors, etc..to make a new distro off of say Ubuntu or Xubuntu and, later on change other things within the system, like removing certain applications and adding new ones and more?
 
Old 09-10-2006, 12:36 AM   #4
JimBass
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: New York City
Distribution: Debian Sid 2.6.32
Posts: 2,100

Rep: Reputation: 49
Yes, that is often refered to as "repackaging" a distro. Since the source code of most distros are publicly available, this happens fairly often. As an example, White Box Linux is a repackaged version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.

It can be done, but there is a lot of work that would be involved. You'd probably need a fairly strong, robust network to host the downloading of it, and you would also be well advised to check with the developers of the distro you plan on being based on. By nature of the open source licences, they can't stop you from doing it, but having their help and cooperation can save you massive problems.

Peace,
JimBass
 
Old 09-10-2006, 04:31 AM   #5
Caesar Tjalbo
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Ņuņoa
Distribution: KaOS
Posts: 93

Rep: Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linux_BSD_Unix
Also can one make a simple new distro, just by changing the names, logos, colors, etc..to make a new distro off of say Ubuntu or Xubuntu and, later on change other things within the system, like removing certain applications and adding new ones and more?
Perhaps you first want to make your own custom CD and later see if you want to change logos etc.
http://wiki.oss-watch.ac.uk/UbuntuDapper/Remaster
 
Old 09-10-2006, 09:56 AM   #6
Linux_BSD_Unix
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Sep 2006
Posts: 19

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 0
Okay thats cool. I'm going to check with Xubuntu developers and order the Xubuntu CD. That'll take about 4 weeks to get and while I wait I'll read up on linux, Xubuntu and as much as I can and when I get it I'll step up my internet and read up more before I attempt to alter it to amke a distro.
 
Old 09-10-2006, 10:20 AM   #7
uselpa
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Luxemburg
Distribution: Slackware, OS X
Posts: 1,507

Rep: Reputation: 46
If you want to learn more as you say, Slackware is known to be a good teacher, with the help of the Slackware forum here on LQ. For older machines, you can use XFCE or, better even, Fluxbox which both come with Slackware. Slackware with Fluxbox runs a lot better on my old laptop than Xubuntu.
 
Old 09-10-2006, 03:57 PM   #8
BiThian
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Romania
Distribution: NetBSD 3.1
Posts: 118

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by uselpa
If you want to learn more as you say, Slackware is known to be a good teacher, with the help of the Slackware forum here on LQ. For older machines, you can use XFCE or, better even, Fluxbox which both come with Slackware. Slackware with Fluxbox runs a lot better on my old laptop than Xubuntu.
Still, I wouldn't recommend Slackware to a beginner I think is better to start with something like Ubuntu, FC, SuSE aka Windows-like. After a period of using them, if you feel the need to go much deeper into Linux (you want something more than just listening to music, playing videos), try Slackware, Gentoo. These two (and not only) will "force" you to learn Linux

Last edited by BiThian; 09-10-2006 at 03:59 PM.
 
Old 09-10-2006, 04:06 PM   #9
uselpa
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Luxemburg
Distribution: Slackware, OS X
Posts: 1,507

Rep: Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BiThian
Still, I wouldn't recommend Slackware to a beginner
That depends on the person.

If somebody just wants to use Linux, Slackware is the wrong choice because it will take some time to be up and running. However, if somebody really wants to learn Linux then a user-friendly distro is the wrong choice because you can't understand what you are doing, too many things happen behind the scenes and that will put you off.

I have made that experience with SUSE and a few others, and if I hadn't found Slackware, I'd have dropped Linux altogether and gone back to FreeBSD. So at least in my case Slackware was the only reasonable beginner distro I have found until now.
 
Old 09-10-2006, 05:08 PM   #10
JimBass
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: New York City
Distribution: Debian Sid 2.6.32
Posts: 2,100

Rep: Reputation: 49
The way I always relate distro choices is a story about Nintendo 64. My 3rd year of college, one of my roommates bought a Nintendo 64, which I believe had just come out (fall of 1997). As that was the same year we all turned 21 (legal drinking age in the US), we excelled at getting home from school, drinking, and ending up with 4 of us infront of the Nintendo, shooting each other up in a James Bond game. Besides the player vs. player mode, you could actually play a single player game, and you had a choice of 3 or so difficulties. From time to time we'd all play single player games, to practice for our shoot-em-up sessions. We'd play a few minutes on easy or medium difficulty. One of us however, would play solo on the difficult setting, never even trying easy or medium. We'd laugh at how easily he'd get killed, but it greatly helped his skill at the game. In short time, he began dominating our sessions, and even beat the game in solo mode.

Slackware is the uncontested king of difficult distros. Maybe LFS, Gentoo, and a few others come close. Debian (in original flavor, no disrespect is intended towards the Ubuntu family, but they make things much easier than straight Debian) is my personal favorite, lies somewhere between the middle and difficult. Suse, Fedora, and other rpm distros are all in the easy category.

Yes, starting of difficult can be hard/impossible for many people, but if you succeed at that, everything else is a breeze.

Peace,
JimBass
 
Old 09-10-2006, 06:14 PM   #11
uselpa
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Luxemburg
Distribution: Slackware, OS X
Posts: 1,507

Rep: Reputation: 46
Interesting analogy. BTW, I appreciate Debian a lot, but it's way more complicated than Slackware because of its elaborate principles and powerful and complex tools. IMO the other great distro to learn.
 
Old 09-11-2006, 03:11 AM   #12
BiThian
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2006
Location: Romania
Distribution: NetBSD 3.1
Posts: 118

Rep: Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by uselpa
I have made that experience with SUSE and a few others, and if I hadn't found Slackware, I'd have dropped Linux altogether and gone back to FreeBSD.
Well, you weren't quite a beginner, you know the *nix philosophy . I wonder what would do a Windows user (who has no clue about what's Linux) with Slackware?
 
Old 09-11-2006, 05:48 AM   #13
uselpa
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Luxemburg
Distribution: Slackware, OS X
Posts: 1,507

Rep: Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by BiThian
Well, you weren't quite a beginner, you know the *nix philosophy . I wonder what would do a Windows user (who has no clue about what's Linux) with Slackware?
Oh well I was a Windows user, just with a first successful installation of FreeBSD, and immediately put of by a KDE upgrade from source
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
basic questions on hostname and domain name + related postfix questions Moebius Linux - Newbie 7 09-04-2007 12:50 PM
Solaris - Questions! Questions! Questions! qs_tahmeed Solaris / OpenSolaris 2 07-16-2005 06:27 AM
Questions musky Mandriva 4 04-21-2005 05:25 PM
window manager questions and/or theme questions t3gah Linux - Software 2 02-27-2005 05:16 PM
this is the last of my questions linuxtm2005 Red Hat 1 12-29-2003 04:33 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:27 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration