LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 09-16-2015, 05:02 PM   #16
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 6,909

Rep: Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998

I think you are inadvertently trying to download the web pages rather than the file you want. Click the link given on the page you are following and you will be asked to pick a version of Mint; choose one such as Cinnamon 64=bit and click on that link; then you will see a list of mirrors (sites around that world which host the file) those are the direct links to the file you want and you should choose the nearest one to you geographically (sometimes the nearest is not the fastest but let's keep things simple) and either click that link and let your browser download it or feed it to a download manager if that is what you are using. It will take a long time, depending upon your connection speed to the internet, to download it -- probably at least 10 minutes or more.
 
Old 09-16-2015, 08:42 PM   #17
mp100
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2015
Posts: 54

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Yes, I did that (but at 32 to match my machine) and yes it did take a while to come down. About 14 minutes from memory.
 
Old 09-17-2015, 02:09 AM   #18
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 6,909

Rep: Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998
Then the next thing to do would be to look for the .iso file in Windows and confirm its location. Once you know that you know where to look when VirtualBox asks you to browse to it.
 
Old 09-17-2015, 02:52 AM   #19
beachboy2
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Location: Wild West Wales, UK
Distribution: Linux Mint 18 MATE, Solus 3 MATE, antiX-17, MX-16
Posts: 2,168
Blog Entries: 9

Rep: Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774
mp100,

To locate the downloaded .iso file, click the Start button and then, in the Search box, type:

linuxmint

From the highlighted result(s) you should then be able to locate the downloaded linuxmint-17.2-cinnamon-32bit.iso file.

For future use in Firefox I suggest using Desktop for your downloaded files. It makes them much easier to locate:

Tools > Options > General > Downloads

Then click on the Browse button and select Desktop instead of Downloads.

https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb...nload-settings

Last edited by beachboy2; 09-17-2015 at 03:08 AM.
 
Old 09-17-2015, 03:26 AM   #20
mp100
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2015
Posts: 54

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Got it and have been playing with Libre! Thanks fellows! I'd now like to ask the community's opinion of what is the best and most stable distro to use for a production machine. My uses would be Word type documents, some pdfs, some web searching and a good email client. I am not a gamer nor do I use graphics a great deal. But I want to avoid the command line and much prefer a Windows type GUI (but not an M$oft type culture)!
 
Old 09-17-2015, 09:45 AM   #21
beachboy2
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Location: Wild West Wales, UK
Distribution: Linux Mint 18 MATE, Solus 3 MATE, antiX-17, MX-16
Posts: 2,168
Blog Entries: 9

Rep: Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774Reputation: 774
mp100,

It is all down to personal preference which Linux OS you decide to use.

Linux Mint
has the expandable menus with which you are familiar in W7 and it is generally reckoned to be a good starting point for new Linux adopters.

Like many other Linux OSs it comes laden with many programs already installed including LibreOffice (includes Writer for word processing).

Firefox and Thunderbird are the browser and email client but others can be used.
You may already use Gmail or other web-based email like Hotmail and therefore would not need to use Thunderbird.

Don't get too anxious about use of the command line. You will rarely need it.


You may need to use it to install a new package occasionally.

Example, installing Skype:

Open Terminal and type the following:

Code:
sudo apt-get install skype
Press Enter and then type your password (it is not displayed for security reasons).

Press Enter again.

You will probably be asked "Do you want to continue?"

Type y and press Enter.

Linux commands cheat sheet:
http://files.fosswire.com/2008/04/ubunturef.pdf


Just relax and learn at your own pace.

If you need advice on a particular topic, first do a search on these forums and if you cannot find a suitable answer, then make another post, giving as much information as possible in order that others may help you more efficiently

Last edited by beachboy2; 09-17-2015 at 09:47 AM.
 
Old 09-17-2015, 02:44 PM   #22
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 6,909

Rep: Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998
Well, for stability there's Debian's Stable release, currently codenamed Jessie. But, then, I am biased as a fairly long-time Debian user. Mint should do you fine though. AS the previous poster said.
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachboy2 View Post
Just relax and learn at your own pace.
I would suggest you install a few, different, distributions if you get chance and try them all out to see whether there is one which "clicks" better. The great thing about VMs is that you can try anything you like risk-free -- if you start to thing you would like to keep a virtual machine long-term and are worried about loosing customisations and the like you can even take a snapshot as a backup.
 
Old 09-17-2015, 03:17 PM   #23
mp100
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2015
Posts: 54

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I expected that this query would bring out all the heartfelt opinions. Let me refine what I would like. I don't really want to take up time experimenting if I can avoid it (haven't really got the time to 'try them all out' and would prefer to tap into the collective wisdom here!). I want to go for the most Windows 7 like environment and learn to use it as quickly as possible (and not have to unlearn anything!). I want a stable distro as much like the Windows 7 GUI as possible. Minimal or no command line stuff. Word processing including pdf, email, browsing, a vb6 (not dot.net) alternative (Gambas?). Just switch on and work rather than M$ continual 'upgrades' and so on. Although I'm 75 (started with DOS and 4K RAM!) I still work and am flat out.

Last edited by mp100; 09-17-2015 at 03:18 PM.
 
Old 09-17-2015, 03:36 PM   #24
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 6,909

Rep: Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998
Why not stick with Mint then? If you don't like or want to stick with Mint then some reasons why not would help point the way to what you may like. Advising on which distribution and desktop environment somebody should use is notoriously difficult as it is different for everyone.
Personally, I use XFCE on any distribution I use -- it's reminiscent of Windows 2000 out of the box but can be made more "snazzy" if you wish (I don't do an awful lot bar add compositing for transparent panel and terminal windows). I use Debian Sid because, occasionally, the libraries in Debian Stable will be a little old for something to install easily.
I'm sure everyone else has their own favourites for their own reasons.
The reason I suggested Mint is because the interface should be fairly easy to use after Windows, it's not particularly unstable, if you install it on bare metal rather than VirtualBox you should get any drivers you want even those with non-free components (which you don't get by default in Debian) and you get things like DVD playing out of the box which even Ubuntu may not do for legal reasons. It's also more up-to-date than Debian Stable so things like Skype or Steam are likely to be easier to install (I know you might not want them specifically but it also applies to third-party applications in general).
 
Old 09-17-2015, 03:43 PM   #25
mp100
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2015
Posts: 54

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Skype I would like. Steam probably not. I have been looking at http://www.lgiso.org/ Very interesting stuff! When I got to Debian reviews I was fascinated by one of the cons mentioned which is a partly arrogant community. Reminds me of my foray into the Visual Basic dot.net community (I am a diehard Visual Basic 6 person (Visual Basic 6 is completely unlike Visual Basic dot.net). I found that community to be extremely arrogant and high handed. Unlike this one, which to date has been extremely helpful! Keep 'em coming. Oh, nearly forgot, Mint strikes me as a bit pale (if that is the best way to describe it).
 
Old 09-17-2015, 03:47 PM   #26
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 6,909

Rep: Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998
I wouldn't worry about the Debian community -- you'll likely not have much to do with it as you'll find help through google and on here. That said, I've sought help in the Debian IRC channels and received very good and patient help especially considering I'd managed to mess something up without realising it.
 
Old 09-17-2015, 03:53 PM   #27
mp100
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2015
Posts: 54

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
I miss the beer, 273. Particularly OSH!
 
Old 09-17-2015, 03:55 PM   #28
273
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Dec 2011
Location: UK
Distribution: Debian Sid AMD64, Raspbian Wheezy, various VMs
Posts: 6,909

Rep: Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998Reputation: 1998
Quote:
Originally Posted by mp100 View Post
I miss the beer, 273. Particularly OSH!
OSH?
 
Old 09-17-2015, 03:58 PM   #29
mp100
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2015
Posts: 54

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Old Speckled Hen
 
Old 09-17-2015, 10:16 PM   #30
wpeckham
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Location: Continental USA
Distribution: Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora, RedHat, DSL, Puppy, CentOS, Knoppix, Mint-DE, Sparky, Vsido, tinycore, Q4OS
Posts: 2,402

Rep: Reputation: 970Reputation: 970Reputation: 970Reputation: 970Reputation: 970Reputation: 970Reputation: 970Reputation: 970
Corporate policy, even if it does not yet exist.

I would go with one of the main distributions for which corporate support is available. It is easier to make a business case, even if you are NOT going to buy the support, if support is available at need.

Suse (OpenSuse), RHEL (CentOS), Ubuntu are obvious options, but it is less known that many other distributions have such support available. All of these provide excellent desktop environments, with no need for the average user to go under the (GUI) hood. All of them have excellent support communities and many users worldwide, in addition to the supporting corporations and sponsors.

Personally, I like things a little more cutting-edge (vsido or sparky). Alas, my company is barely comfortable with linux servers, and not at all with desktops.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] Networking Oracle Linux on Virtual box on Windows seven oraenthu@live.com Linux - Virtualization and Cloud 3 01-08-2015 08:36 AM
Trying to run Oracle Virtual Box on linux CentOs cupps101 Linux - Newbie 3 03-20-2014 05:20 PM
Issue faced while installing Linux in virtual machine in Oracle virtual box ravisingh1 Linux - Virtualization and Cloud 5 04-07-2013 11:42 AM
Loop forinstalling LINUX onto Oracle VM Virtual Box arca777 Linux - Newbie 1 01-18-2013 11:49 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:26 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration