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Old 06-30-2015, 11:55 PM   #1
NHKomaiha
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Exclamation Problem with Partitioning a 1TB Hard disk on Linux Mint Rebecca 17.1


FIRST OF ALL, PLEASE BE PATIENT, IM NOT A PROFFESIONAL, IM NEW TO LINUX OS
SHORT DESCRIPTION: I installed linux mint rebecca 17.1 I didnít read everything well while installing so I've gut my 1TB (NTFS 4 parts all) hard disk as 1 partition (ext4) and I want to partition it to be at least 2 or 3 parts

PLEASE< IF YOU WANT TO REPLY WITH THE BEST USEFUL INFO, READ THE LONG DESCRIPTION


LONG DESCRIPTION:I was running 2 windows OSs on 2 partitions (C for windows 10, and F for windows 7 ultimate)... I decided to use linux to start learning to make an android app so i installed Linux Mint Rebecca 17.1 n lost the partitions because i didn't read everything well while installing.. Now i want to partition the hard disk to be AT LEAST 2 or 3 parts (my hard disk supports 4 primary partitions) i searched for that on the internet and didn't find anything except fdisk and GParted.
First i tried GParted
http://i59.tinypic.com/dxkdx3.png
I cant change the size it stuck at 0 always

I tried to learn how to use FDisk in the terminal
http://i59.tinypic.com/28lq92d.png
but I'm not finding a simple tutorial
GAOL:

HELP ME TO PARTITION IT TO BE 4 PARTS, AND PLEASE SIMPLIFY BECAUSE I'M NEW TO LINUX OS

Last edited by NHKomaiha; 07-04-2015 at 10:04 PM. Reason: problem solved
 
Old 07-01-2015, 06:30 PM   #2
JaseP
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You have to delete or resize the existing partitions before you can add partitions the drive. A GParted disk is one way to go for this (especially re-sizing),... but you could probably use whatever Linux distro you wish to install, and partition the drive manually at the partitioning stage... Again,... you must delete or resize a partition before you can change the partitioning.

If you don't have any files on the machine (or have only a few that you can move), it's far easier to delete all the partitions and start fresh. Re-sizing takes forever. If you are going to stay strictly Linux with the machine, I'd recommend about 1/3 of the disk for the root partition, a bit less for the /home partition (leaving room for the swap partition), and about 2X the RAM for swap (subtract that from the /home partition's 2/3). The reason for keeping a separate /home partition is that you can more easily install a new Linux OS (completely different distro or newer version), without re-formatting the /home partition, and retain all your old data (simply use a different user name and copy/migrate your files over to the new account after installation).

Things to watch out for are partitioning type; GPT vs. MBR. Read up on the differences before starting the process. MBR is easier to use, and you'll find more documentation,... But GPT is the new standard and solves many problems associated with MBR. Another thing to watch out for is UEFI versus legacy boot (and GPT vs. MBR will factor into that). The K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple, Stupid) method is to turn off UEFI secure boot, enable legacy boot, and use MBR partitioning.

As far as partitioning goes... 4 available (hardware) partitions can translate to far more partitions by using Logical Partitions.

Oh,... And you are MUCH better off putting Windows inside a VM than running it on bare metal. The reason for this is that Windows's boot loader loves to trash Linux partitions, and will sometimes do this on upgrades. I'd recommend KVM (with Aqemu as a front end), but you might consider VirtualBox. If you know VirtualBox's GUI interface, Aqemu is easy to use.
 
Old 07-01-2015, 07:12 PM   #3
yancek
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Are you trying to resize by using GParted on the Mint installation DVD? If you are using GParted from the installed Mint, that won't work, you need to use the DVD and you need to first unmount the partition by right-clicking to highlight sda1 and selecting unmount.
 
Old 07-01-2015, 07:28 PM   #4
JaseP
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He would likely get an error from GParted about trying to resize a mounted partition (& most install disks work the same),... No?!?!
 
Old 07-02-2015, 06:34 AM   #5
fatmac
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Back up anything you have on the disk, (your personal data), to external media, then re install, setting up the partitioning to suit, then copy back your data.
It will be your easiest option.
 
Old 07-02-2015, 06:14 PM   #6
NHKomaiha
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JaseP View Post
You have to delete or resize the existing partitions before you can add partitions the drive. A GParted disk is one way to go for this (especially re-sizing),... but you could probably use whatever Linux distro you wish to install, and partition the drive manually at the partitioning stage... Again,... you must delete or resize a partition before you can change the partitioning.

If you don't have any files on the machine (or have only a few that you can move), it's far easier to delete all the partitions and start fresh. Re-sizing takes forever. If you are going to stay strictly Linux with the machine, I'd recommend about 1/3 of the disk for the root partition, a bit less for the /home partition (leaving room for the swap partition), and about 2X the RAM for swap (subtract that from the /home partition's 2/3). The reason for keeping a separate /home partition is that you can more easily install a new Linux OS (completely different distro or newer version), without re-formatting the /home partition, and retain all your old data (simply use a different user name and copy/migrate your files over to the new account after installation).

Things to watch out for are partitioning type; GPT vs. MBR. Read up on the differences before starting the process. MBR is easier to use, and you'll find more documentation,... But GPT is the new standard and solves many problems associated with MBR. Another thing to watch out for is UEFI versus legacy boot (and GPT vs. MBR will factor into that). The K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple, Stupid) method is to turn off UEFI secure boot, enable legacy boot, and use MBR partitioning.

As far as partitioning goes... 4 available (hardware) partitions can translate to far more partitions by using Logical Partitions.

Oh,... And you are MUCH better off putting Windows inside a VM than running it on bare metal. The reason for this is that Windows's boot loader loves to trash Linux partitions, and will sometimes do this on upgrades. I'd recommend KVM (with Aqemu as a front end), but you might consider VirtualBox. If you know VirtualBox's GUI interface, Aqemu is easy to use.
IM SORRY BUT I WANT TO BE SURE THAT IM USING THE RIGHT WORD... partition disk= make it parts? (e.g:1TB>> 250 250 250 250)...if yes, so whats the difference between it and resizing?

So i cant partition the hard disk while it's mounted?

btw GParted doesnt do anything .. i cant slide to resize and when i write the value manualy, it goes back to 0..
another thing.. yes i have winndows 7 in a VM i use VBox

im sorry i dont know much about MBR and so.. what i think about MBR is that its the base for the disk (its where the disk take the commands... or maybe its the base where data are placed on.. idk)
 
Old 07-02-2015, 06:31 PM   #7
NHKomaiha
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fatmac View Post
Back up anything you have on the disk, (your personal data), to external media, then re install, setting up the partitioning to suit, then copy back your data.
It will be your easiest option.
i was thinking to make that but I've a problem that i don't have an enough external space for all the data .. I've some important ones too..
 
Old 07-02-2015, 06:33 PM   #8
NHKomaiha
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by JaseP View Post
You have to delete or resize the existing partitions before you can add partitions the drive. A GParted disk is one way to go for this (especially re-sizing),... but you could probably use whatever Linux distro you wish to install, and partition the drive manually at the partitioning stage... Again,... you must delete or resize a partition before you can change the partitioning.

If you don't have any files on the machine (or have only a few that you can move), it's far easier to delete all the partitions and start fresh. Re-sizing takes forever. If you are going to stay strictly Linux with the machine, I'd recommend about 1/3 of the disk for the root partition, a bit less for the /home partition (leaving room for the swap partition), and about 2X the RAM for swap (subtract that from the /home partition's 2/3). The reason for keeping a separate /home partition is that you can more easily install a new Linux OS (completely different distro or newer version), without re-formatting the /home partition, and retain all your old data (simply use a different user name and copy/migrate your files over to the new account after installation).

Things to watch out for are partitioning type; GPT vs. MBR. Read up on the differences before starting the process. MBR is easier to use, and you'll find more documentation,... But GPT is the new standard and solves many problems associated with MBR. Another thing to watch out for is UEFI versus legacy boot (and GPT vs. MBR will factor into that). The K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple, Stupid) method is to turn off UEFI secure boot, enable legacy boot, and use MBR partitioning.

As far as partitioning goes... 4 available (hardware) partitions can translate to far more partitions by using Logical Partitions.

Oh,... And you are MUCH better off putting Windows inside a VM than running it on bare metal. The reason for this is that Windows's boot loader loves to trash Linux partitions, and will sometimes do this on upgrades. I'd recommend KVM (with Aqemu as a front end), but you might consider VirtualBox. If you know VirtualBox's GUI interface, Aqemu is easy to use.
ive posted a reply, but waiting the accepting of admin.. maybe cz i pressed "Post Reply" not "Qoute"
 
Old 07-03-2015, 03:47 PM   #9
jefro
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Side note, JaseP, you are correct, a mounted partition would/should stop gparted. It tends to then ask you if you want to unmount it or something like that. One would be unable to unmount a boot system disk (partition that holds the booted system) in linux.

Windows may be able to do some of of the work. I'd use it but MS made it command line for full control now.

Your references to C and F and such have limited meaning as the actual position and type of drive may be an issue. GPT and MBR are two different schemes to use.

Boot to some live cd and use gparted to graphically see what is where maybe to start. We'd also need to know if it is GPT.

Last edited by jefro; 07-03-2015 at 03:49 PM.
 
Old 07-03-2015, 05:47 PM   #10
NHKomaiha
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http://i60.tinypic.com/16byp0m.png
does that mean that my disk is MBR? (Partition Table: msdos)

why it shows msdos.. i dont have any widows or dos trash left on the disk.. while installing i formatted the disk and made it 1 part ext4.

Last edited by NHKomaiha; 07-03-2015 at 05:52 PM.
 
Old 07-04-2015, 10:04 PM   #11
NHKomaiha
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Thumbs up Solved

Solved, i used USB image writer to write linux installation iso on an SD card n partitioned the disk n cancelled the installation.. now its partitioned
( i didnt lose any data too)
thanks all for giving me more information

Last edited by NHKomaiha; 07-04-2015 at 10:05 PM.
 
  


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