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Old 11-28-2015, 02:21 PM   #1
offgridguy
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Question Problem with install


Hello to all. I am not new to Linux but new to slackware, I have been trying to install from the live CD. Actually once I got the partition manager figured, everything went well, I installed the complete package without prompts. The problem came when I was asked to create a root password, which I did but subsequently didn't work when I tried to launch the new system. So I went through the entire process again. Same result, it told me I had a password but again won't accept it. The terminal shows no evidence of any keyboard activity as I type the password. Is this normal? So I can't verify what or if I have created a password. Would it work if I reinstalled and didn't create a password? I really want to try this system especially after getting this close.
All help gratefully appreciated.

Last edited by offgridguy; 11-28-2015 at 03:56 PM. Reason: typo
 
Old 11-28-2015, 02:29 PM   #2
Emerson
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Password is not echoed to the terminal, type it in and hit Enter.
 
Old 11-28-2015, 02:41 PM   #3
pan64
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yes, password will not be visible on your screen at all. Furthermore when you reinstall the OS the old password will be lost.
 
Old 11-28-2015, 03:56 PM   #4
offgridguy
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Thank you for the response, unfortunately I did try typing it in and hitting enter, many , many, many times, without success. But is a password essential?
 
Old 11-28-2015, 04:36 PM   #5
yancek
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Have you read the Slackware install documentation at the Slackware site?

http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:install

When you first boot Slackware you should see a login prompt: localhost login: At this point you type in root and hit Enter. The next prompt should be password, enter your password and hit enter and the prompt should change to root@localhost. You would then need to create a normal user and set to boot to a GUI if you want. If you don't see this or if you do and it still fails, probably a bad download or a bad burn or any number of other possibilities.
 
Old 11-28-2015, 04:54 PM   #6
offgridguy
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Thank you, yancek. I have reinstalled and now seem to have the password issue resolved. The prompt has changed from localhost login to root@darkstar. so I will follow up on the procedure to set up a normal user and boot to GUI. Hopefully it tells me how in the link you provided, if not I will be back, but thank you for the help I appreciate it.
 
Old 11-28-2015, 05:38 PM   #7
offgridguy
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So far so good I now have a graphical interface, although I am not a fan of the KDE desktop environment.
However my next hurdle is the internet. How can I get the wifi activated to recognize my air card?
Thank you again yancek the link was very helpful, I wish I had it before I started this.

Last edited by offgridguy; 11-28-2015 at 05:40 PM.
 
Old 11-28-2015, 06:31 PM   #8
yancek
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The links below to the Slackbook section on wifi should help. Or try the second link to the Slackbook wifi page.

http://docs.slackware.com/slackbook:wifi

http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:...e_your_network
 
Old 11-29-2015, 07:01 PM   #9
offgridguy
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Thanks for the links yancek, I took a look at them, haven't had time to try and do anything with it yet, but it looks promising. I am going to check out some of Slackwares capabilities to see if it is everything I am hoping for. I already like the boot choice it gives you on the start screen, much better than the ubuntu grub menu. Just a small thing I know. The real reason I wanted Slackware was because of the ability to operate as root user, total control over the system,I love that feature. I confess that I am woefully ignorant of terminal commands and their use. Is their a glossary that explains some of that? I can definitely see the need to become proficient in that area.
Update: I now have internet connection via wifi air card up and running. So far everything is working well. I am finding Slackware is slow, which doesn't surprise or disappoint me as my computer is slow anyway with windows 7 (dual boot) and besides Slackware seems to have a lot of features so I didn't expect it to be fast. With a lightweight system like Lubuntu it is noticeably faster but Lubuntu doesn't have much to work with either. So far I am thrilled with Slackware, just to have it up and running. This is what I have been looking for in a linux OS.

Last edited by offgridguy; 11-29-2015 at 07:54 PM. Reason: Update
 
Old 11-29-2015, 07:49 PM   #10
chrism01
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You can become root on any *nix system.

Re terminal cmds: its generally known as the 'shell' and there are several different ones available.
The default on Linux is usually 'bash', so you can use that to guide you when searching.
Use
Code:
echo $SHELL
to check which shell you are in.

NB: Linux is case sensitive for cmds, files etc.

Useful search tool http://linux.die.net/man/
Tutorials:
http://rute.2038bug.com/index.html.gz - a little old but most of it still applies
http://tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners-G...tml/index.html
http://www.tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/
 
Old 11-29-2015, 07:54 PM   #11
Emerson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offgridguy View Post
The real reason I wanted Slackware was because of the ability to operate as root user, total control over the system,I love that feature. I confess that I am woefully ignorant of terminal commands and their use. Is their a glossary that explains some of that? I can definitely see the need to become proficient in that area.
You are mistaken, root is not user, root is administrator. Using your box as root makes your system vulnerable because even malicious processes will run with root rights.
 
Old 11-30-2015, 10:24 AM   #12
offgridguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerson View Post
You are mistaken, root is not user, root is administrator. Using your box as root makes your system vulnerable because even malicious processes will run with root rights.
I realize root is admin. , but you can use the system as root. I have heard your argument before, in other linux forums. I still prefer Slackware to ubuntu where the root account is locked.
 
Old 11-30-2015, 10:36 AM   #13
Emerson
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Root account is not locked in Ubuntu, you can use sudo -i to become root. Having no direct login is a good measure to keep noobs from taking shortcuts and running the system as root when they are too lazy to set up their user account properly.
 
Old 11-30-2015, 10:39 AM   #14
offgridguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrism01 View Post
You can become root on any *nix system.
Thank you for the links, I appreciate it. Regarding your above quote. I spent enough time learning ubuntu and other linux systems to know that you can indeed become root, however in the case of ubuntu where the root account is locked, you can only effect changes within the preset parameters given. Any attempt otherwise will result in 'permission denied' which shows who the real administrator is. I found this very frustrating.
It was breath of fresh air to find that Slackware doesn't even prompt you to set up a user account. I do have a user account, for all the obvious reasons. Slackware still gives me the freedom to operate as root even if means bombing my system, which I have no intention of doing. With ubuntu I was very aware of the fact that I was never in control.
 
Old 11-30-2015, 10:43 AM   #15
offgridguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Emerson View Post
Root account is not locked in Ubuntu, you can use sudo -i to become root. Having no direct login is a good measure to keep noobs from taking shortcuts and running the system as root when they are too lazy to set up their user account properly.
Here again I agree with you, you can login as root, I have done so, only to find permission denied messages
when I attempted changes outside the defaults. (unless 15.04 is different)

Last edited by offgridguy; 11-30-2015 at 10:44 AM.
 
  


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