LinuxQuestions.org
Welcome to the most active Linux Forum on the web.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-12-2004, 02:44 PM   #1
0perat0r
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: New Jersey, US
Distribution: Red Hat Linux WS version 3
Posts: 126

Rep: Reputation: 15
permissions


I've only been working with Red Hat for a few days, and have had a brief exposure to UNIX some years ago. I was intrugued by Linux, so I obtained Red Hat WS over the weekend. Of course, my head is full of Micrisoft OS knowledge, which I have been working with for quite some time.

My first question is thus:

How can I give a user who is not root full administrative rights? I have noted that each file or folder created has its own set of permissions you can change to allow other users to read/write/execute. What happens if you place a user into the "root" group, for instance?

Thanks!
 
Old 07-12-2004, 02:48 PM   #2
acid_kewpie
Moderator
 
Registered: Jun 2001
Location: UK
Distribution: Gentoo, RHEL, Fedora, Centos
Posts: 43,417

Rep: Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975Reputation: 1975
that's a really not nice first question, it will amke people think that for unknown reasons you want your normal use to have root. this is, of course, A REALLY BAD IDEA AND SHOULD BE AVOIDED.

generally speaking though, the admin group is called "wheel" if it's not "root". adding a user to that group will give them the same rights.
 
Old 07-12-2004, 02:52 PM   #3
Tinkster
Moderator
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: in a fallen world
Distribution: slackware by choice, others too :} ... android.
Posts: 23,067
Blog Entries: 11

Rep: Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910
Re: permissions

Hi, and welcome to LQ!

Quote:
Originally posted by 0perat0r
How can I give a user who is not root full administrative rights?
You definitely DON'T want to do that. Not only because
it's too easy to render your system unusable by accident
but also because if you run everything as a user with
root privileges you'd open the doors wide for exploits
or trojans. Please search the forum for more in-depth
discussions of this topic, it has been asked (and
answered) quite a few times...

Quote:
I have noted that each file or folder created has its own set of permissions you can change to allow other users to read/write/execute. What happens if you place a user into the "root" group, for instance?
Depends on what the permissions actually are ...
If a file, for example, were owned by root:root,
and the permissions are
rwsr-xr-- a user in group root could actually run it.


Cheers,
Tink


P.S.:
/me high-fives Chris:"You soundly beat me to this one!" ;)


Last edited by Tinkster; 07-12-2004 at 03:07 PM.
 
Old 07-12-2004, 02:59 PM   #4
0perat0r
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: New Jersey, US
Distribution: Red Hat Linux WS version 3
Posts: 126

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks to you both for your quick responses. I understand the dangers of giving users full control, as I do Windows admin as well. This is on a home PC, so I would be the only user with that kind of control. As for the security risks, your comments are noted.

Thanks
 
Old 07-12-2004, 03:12 PM   #5
Tinkster
Moderator
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: in a fallen world
Distribution: slackware by choice, others too :} ... android.
Posts: 23,067
Blog Entries: 11

Rep: Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910
Quote:
Originally posted by 0perat0r
This is on a home PC, so I would be the only user with that kind of control. As for the security risks, your comments are noted.

Thanks
Well, as soon as there's an internet connection involved
there's no such thing as a HomePC anymore. Always bear
in mind that, even though Linux programs are usually more
robust in this respect than Windows will ever be, there MAY
be an exploit that hasn't been fixed yet, and you may be
running a vulnerable piece of code. You want to minimize
the risks, not only because you may have stored sensitive
data (like banking or credit card details), but also because
you don't want your machine to be the leap-stone for a
bad hacker, or for it to be used in a DDoS attack ...


Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 07-13-2004, 06:04 PM   #6
0perat0r
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: New Jersey, US
Distribution: Red Hat Linux WS version 3
Posts: 126

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Tink:

Are there some intial steps I should take to lock my system down, and/or make it less vulnerable?

Thanks
 
Old 07-14-2004, 12:38 AM   #7
Tinkster
Moderator
 
Registered: Apr 2002
Location: in a fallen world
Distribution: slackware by choice, others too :} ... android.
Posts: 23,067
Blog Entries: 11

Rep: Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910Reputation: 910
Check out the links-section and the sticky
threads at the top of the security-forum


;)

Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 07-14-2004, 11:42 AM   #8
0perat0r
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: New Jersey, US
Distribution: Red Hat Linux WS version 3
Posts: 126

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks again. There is a wealth of material here. I think once I start to understand how the OS is handling its processes, the security vulnerabilities will become clearer. I notice that when I do a netstat command in the shell, that I see not only my connections with other machines, but also OS activity. I am behind a NAT (router), so at least I have one layer of extra security. There is also a built-in firewall in this version of Linux, which can block certain protocols. Firestarter (firewall) appears to be a good first solution for me. With the amount of control available with Linux, however, I can't help thinking that I could probably accomplish most of its functions myself.

You've been a great help so far.

Thanks,
0perat0r
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
file permissions OK, but command permissions? stabu Linux - General 2 10-05-2005 12:00 PM
permission ... permissions .... permissions alaios Linux - General 1 05-31-2005 04:16 AM
Permissions jymmi Linux - Newbie 3 04-14-2005 11:43 PM
Permissions help reddog64 Linux - Newbie 1 04-22-2004 05:23 PM
getting a directory's permissions and creating a new one with the same permissions newbie1000101 Programming 1 04-10-2004 12:52 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:39 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration