LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-21-2017, 09:04 AM   #1
jjanderson5
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Saylorsburg, PA, US
Distribution: Bunsenlabs Hydrogen
Posts: 21

Rep: Reputation: 0
PCs with no legacy mode


All my PCs are older and I have been booting them in legacy mode. Until now, I have been using hard disks that are all <= 1 terabyte. I would like to move to larger disk drives that can hold more backups so that I will not have to do cleanup maintenance as much.

To move to disk drives > 1 terabyte, I understand that I must use UEFI booting mode. I'm curious --- do newer PCs run in UEFI mode only, or do they still support legacy mode?

Interestingly, when I tried a few searches on the internet for things like, "PCs with UEFI mode only", all the results were links to information on how to boot in legacy mode vs UEFI mode. This leads me to believe that new PCs still always support legacy boot mode, but that is only a guess.


Jim Anderson
 
Old 07-21-2017, 09:44 AM   #2
miqrojamie
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2017
Location: England
Distribution: Xubuntu
Posts: 7

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Most computers still have legacy mode as a fallback, and some Linux distributions (such as Ubuntu) work with UEFI.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-21-2017, 10:15 AM   #3
rtmistler
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: USA
Distribution: MINT Debian, Angstrom, SUSE, Ubuntu, Debian
Posts: 9,354
Blog Entries: 13

Rep: Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411Reputation: 4411
I'm more of a proponent of not having system boot disks be large and instead have the data disk be large, as well as external.

I think that you do not need UEFI to have large data disks and that it only is needed if the boot disk is to be larger than 1 TB.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-21-2017, 10:53 AM   #4
yancek
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: PCLinux, Slackware
Posts: 9,422

Rep: Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088Reputation: 2088
Quote:
To move to disk drives > 1 terabyte, I understand that I must use UEFI booting mode.
Doing a little more research with something like "limit on access to larger hard drives with mbr" should bring a number of results with explanations similar to the link below. If you have larger hard drives over 1TB which you want to use for data storage, it should not make any difference. Also, my understanding is that the problem begins with 2TB+ drives. I believe almost all major manufacturers still give you the option to use UEFI or MBR. Less of a problem if you are not dual booting with a newer windows system.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/25...er-boot-record
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-21-2017, 04:09 PM   #5
jefro
Moderator
 
Registered: Mar 2008
Posts: 20,961

Rep: Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402Reputation: 3402
Pretty sure most modern computers could use Linux without uefi to drives over 2Tb. I forget the scsi limit but it's pretty high. If bios see's the drive, there is almost 100% chance you can use it in linux.
Some have also used a smaller boot drive and used larger drives for data.

Last edited by jefro; 07-21-2017 at 04:10 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-21-2017, 04:52 PM   #6
JeremyBoden
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2011
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Debian
Posts: 1,893

Rep: Reputation: 469Reputation: 469Reputation: 469Reputation: 469Reputation: 469
If you format a disk as MBR (legacy mode) you are limited to a maximum of 4 primary partitions.

Formatting as GPT allows you to use a reserved area of the GPT for a MBR boot (with its restrictions); as a UEFI GPT you get lots of primary partitions and no 2.2TB limit.
If you are also using Windows, you are probably forced to use MBR?
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-21-2017, 05:01 PM   #7
hydrurga
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Pictland
Distribution: Linux Mint 20 MATE
Posts: 8,048
Blog Entries: 5

Rep: Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918Reputation: 2918
There are a few misconceptions here, mostly related to the distinction between GPT and UEFI.

If you want to address disks over 2TiB (and your disk isn't Advanced Format that can present native logical sectors of 4096 bytes), you will need GPT partitioning. You do *not* need to have UEFI firmware to support GPT, it works fine with BIOS (termed a "BIOS/GPT boot"). Naturally, both the boot loader and the operating system will need to be GPT-aware.

It should be noted that some buggy BIOSes have problems booting from GPT disks, but you would be unlucky if that affected you.

For more info on MBR vs GPT:

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...-vs-gpt-37329/
 
4 members found this post helpful.
Old 07-23-2017, 01:15 AM   #8
mrmazda
Senior Member
 
Registered: Aug 2016
Location: USA
Distribution: openSUSE, Debian, Knoppix, Mageia, Fedora, others
Posts: 3,332
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1123Reputation: 1123Reputation: 1123Reputation: 1123Reputation: 1123Reputation: 1123Reputation: 1123Reputation: 1123Reputation: 1123
MBR (legacy) mode fully supports all HDs marketed as 2TB. I don't think any other sizes above 2TB are available before 2.5TB, which MBR does not fully support, and does require use of GPT instead. IOW, your older PCs don't necessarily need GPT for you to use larger HDs in them, and neither would UEFI be required, or even an option, depending on the firmware (BIOS) those "older" PCs use.

MBR can be used with a HD larger than 2TB, but not with expectation of unlimited access to the entire HD. The excess capacity above 2TB would simply be wasted unless and until repartitioned with GPT. I use "expectation" because with careful expert partition configuration of more than one partition, more than 2TB can within limits be accessible via MBR partitioning.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
  


Reply

Tags
uefi


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] dual boot win7/slackware 14.2 64bit in legacy mode on gpt disk timsoft Slackware 14 12-11-2016 05:14 PM
LXer: Mozilla Is Phasing Out HTTP Support, a Legacy Mode Will Be Available LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 05-01-2015 10:45 PM
[SOLVED] Booting USB hard drive on UEFI machine in legacy mode aikempshall Slackware 6 11-20-2014 04:14 PM
[SOLVED] GRUB legacy chainloading grub2 (ubuntu) not loading, goes text mode JZL240I-U Linux - Software 12 06-21-2011 04:31 AM
Distros for Legacy PCs Kzin Linux - Distributions 4 08-01-2001 02:54 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:27 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration