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Old 01-25-2011, 10:42 AM   #1
jokar.mohsen
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Question PC-BSD or Linux?


hello.
What is difference between BSD and Linux exist?
when i want install bsd i see some details that exist in linux like partition type,swap partition and etc.
if PC-BSD is free why in pcbsd.org it have price?
what is good for desktop pc?

Thanks.
Best Regards.
 
Old 01-25-2011, 10:49 AM   #2
schneidz
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^ from what i understand bsd is a true derivative of unix and linux is an open source re-implementation of unix (its almost like a difference without a distinction).
 
Old 01-25-2011, 11:04 AM   #3
onebuck
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Hi,

BSD is UNIX-like!

BSD For Linux Users :: Intro would be a good reference.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-25-2011, 08:15 PM   #4
TzaB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jokar.mohsen View Post
What is difference between BSD and Linux exist?
Check this link.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jokar.mohsen View Post
if PC-BSD is free why in pcbsd.org it have price?
Probably, the price is for a CD/DVD that includes PC-BSD. It is a good way to support the project. You are free to download a PC-BSD image and burn it to a CD on your own.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jokar.mohsen View Post
what is good for desktop pc?
If you haven't any previous experience with the UNIX world, i recommend you to start with Ubuntu. It is a user friendly GNU/Linux distro and nowadays is the most used.

TzaB
 
Old 01-25-2011, 08:44 PM   #5
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by TzaB View Post
If you haven't any previous experience with the UNIX world, i recommend you to start with Ubuntu. It is a user friendly GNU/Linux distro and nowadays is the most used.

TzaB
Not to be smart nor baiting but how is recommending Ubuntu going to help someone who wishes to learn or use UNIX/BSD?

There have been loads of newbies who have learned UNIX. Sure some work and dedication but achievable along with the satisfaction of understanding a beautiful system.

I personally would recommend Slackware for a Gnu/Linux that would help someone to move on to UNIX or a Unix-like system.
 
Old 01-25-2011, 09:03 PM   #6
coralfang
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Hi,



Not to be smart nor baiting but how is recommending Ubuntu going to help someone who wishes to learn or use UNIX/BSD?
Well said, ubuntu tends to "mask" all the configuration giving a windows-ish experience... which is not at all good for learning.

Consider what desktop you want to run. In the case of PC-BSD you will immediately notice its KDE orientated. If however you wanted to run GNOME, XFCE or something else, it might be worth looking into FreeBSD itself.

PC-BSD is built ontop of a FreeBSD base system.

A good read here: http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO...ok/x11-wm.html
Fairly straight forward introduction to using the ports system aswell.

All depends on your needs. Best thing to do is simply experiment with both Linux and BSD.
 
Old 01-25-2011, 09:25 PM   #7
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by jokar.mohsen View Post
hello.
What is difference between BSD and Linux exist?
when i want install bsd i see some details that exist in linux like partition type,swap partition and etc.
if PC-BSD is free why in pcbsd.org it have price?
what is good for desktop pc?

Thanks.
Best Regards.
Look at 'PC-BSD' to get some useful information;
Quote:
PC-BSD is a Unix-like, desktop-oriented operating system based on FreeBSD. It aims to be easy to install by using a graphical installation program, and easy and ready-to-use immediately by providing KDE SC as the pre-installed graphical user interface. PC-BSD provides official binary nVidia and Intel drivers for hardware acceleration and an optional 3D desktop interface through Kwin. PC-BSD also contains a package management system allowing users to graphically install pre-built software packages from a single downloaded executable file, which is uncommon on BSD operating systems. In August 2006 it was voted the most beginner friendly operating system by OSWeekly.com.[1]
 
Old 01-26-2011, 07:45 AM   #8
TzaB
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@onebuck and @coralfang

As you mentioned, "Ubuntu tends to "mask" all the configuration giving a windows-ish experience". This is the reason that i suggested Ubuntu. You have a gently introduction to a new World without changing much of what you have learned before. You have the ability to learn the basics (for example the meaning of the Desktop Environment - not only Windows explorer here, the new structure of a file system - not Program Files here, discover/learn new applications for the basic operations - no Windows Media player or Live Messenger lives here, learn the concept of repositories - not only Google search here :-) and much more) without noticing a big difference from the transition.

For me Slackware is for more advanced users. For example, there is not by default a package manager that manages dependencies. Imagine a person that don't know what a dependence is, he/she won't be able to install a program in a few steps in order to admire one of the many advantages of Linux.

Of course, after experiencing with Ubuntu, if you like the whole concept, you are free to explore new places, more advanced like Debian, Slackware, Gentoo that will give you the most of the UNIX World.

Just my opinion,
TzaB

Last edited by TzaB; 01-26-2011 at 04:33 PM. Reason: Grammar
 
Old 01-26-2011, 08:20 AM   #9
jlinkels
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
BSD For Linux Users :: Intro would be a good reference.
That is a very interesting article and non-biased (well sort of ) Anyway it goes beyond "this is better because it is"

Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Quote:PC-BSD is a Unix-like, desktop-oriented operating system based on FreeBSD. It aims to be easy to install by using a graphical installation program, and easy and ready-to-use immediately by providing KDE SC as the pre-installed graphical user interface. PC-BSD provides official binary nVidia and Intel drivers for hardware acceleration and an optional 3D desktop interface through Kwin. PC-BSD also contains a package management system allowing users to graphically install pre-built software packages from a single downloaded executable file, which is uncommon on BSD operating systems. In August 2006 it was voted the most beginner friendly operating system by OSWeekly.com.[1]
..while seeing this summary from the wiki page (I didn't read the article itself) I would swear BSD is indistinguishable from Linux. Funny!

jlinkels
 
Old 01-26-2011, 08:33 AM   #10
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by TzaB View Post
@onebuck and @coralfang
As you mentioned, "Ubuntu tends to "mask" all the configuration giving a windows-ish experience". This is the reason that i suggested Ubuntu. You have a gently introduction to a new World without changing much of what you have learned before. You have the ability to learn the basics (for example the meaning of the Desktop Environment - not only Windows explorer here, the new structure of a file system - not Program Files here, discover/learn new applications for the basic operations - no Windows Media player or Live Messenger lives here, learn the concept of repositories - not only Google search here :-) and many more) without noticing a big difference from the transition.
You will learn the GUI and that is all basically. Sure, you may learn 'sudo' or may be exposed minimally to 'cli' but the DE will be what is used by a user therefore moving comfortably around the environment after time. Hold my hand so I do not get lost but when things fall apart? Where to go or fix it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TzaB View Post
For me Slackware is for more advanced users. For example, there is not by default a package manager that manages dependencies. Imagine a person that don't know what a dependence is, he/she won't be able to install a program in a few steps in order to admire one of the many advantages of Linux.
Myths!
Slackware has package management, pkgtools, slackpkg, sbopkg. No need to manage dependencies unless you add something that is alien to the system but with the above tools you can prepare things. That's BS about installing software. A user can install on a Slackware system without difficulty and the worry of dependency hell by use of SlackBuilds. Or once the user is comfortable with the semantics & syntax then successfully install packages of choice or even create packages for personal use or to share. Other rumor/myth that does not inform the user with truthful information.

As for advanced users as a requirement for Slackware. Again, myth! A user can learn to use Slackware from the onset. Sure learning the system my require some effort & time but worth the investment.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TzaB View Post
Of course, after experiencing with Ubuntu, if you like the whole concept, you are free to explore new places, more advanced like Debian, Slackware, Gentoo that will give you the most of the UNIX World.

Just my opinion,
TzaB
Actually Slackware will provide a UNIX-like experience. If a user wants UNIX then a BSD or licensed UNIX would be the way to go. If a user learns Slackware then the migration to UNIX should be easier than a *buntu or other hold your hand distributions.
 
Old 01-26-2011, 11:18 AM   #11
hughetorrance
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http://www.ee.surrey.ac.uk/Teaching/Unix/unixintro.html


Nice beginners Unix tutorial... ! eight pages.
 
Old 01-26-2011, 02:29 PM   #12
rmknox
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I think it depends on what you want to do

If you want to work at the command line free BSD is great.

There is lots of documentation going back for umpteen years telling you how to use it.

If you want a windowed experience, then you may need to be somewhat sophisticated to install it on free BSD - whereas there are a number of Linux distributions that come with windowing installed ala Microsoft windows. Since Linux is relatively new and the various versions are in rapid flux, you wont find as much info that expains how to use it, but if you merely want a windows experience that may not matter.

My imprecise thots - for what they're worth.
 
Old 01-26-2011, 05:37 PM   #13
wafflesausage
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If you really want to get started with BSDs and you're not very familiar with the command line, try PC-BSD. Also, PC-BSD is not restricted to KDE4, you can easily install a different desktop environment like GNOME or XFCE if you wish. PC-BSD is essentially FreeBSD with some supposed kernel tweaks (I never looked into it, so I can't say much about it), pre-installed software, a desktop environment, and some config file tweaks for easier use. Try breaking it, not dual-booting, and messing with it- you'll learn more out of necessity than you would otherwise.
 
  


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