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Old 09-02-2013, 09:42 AM   #1
validator456
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Partitioning your harddrive into several partitions?


What could be the benefit of partitioning your harddrive into several partitions during installation?
I have always installed my os in the default way. One partition and that is it. But now I am interested.
 
Old 09-02-2013, 09:53 AM   #2
hilyard
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See this link for an intro to the answer to your question, please.
Also see Rute

Last edited by hilyard; 09-02-2013 at 10:02 AM. Reason: add info
 
Old 09-02-2013, 11:14 AM   #3
validator456
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Ok, ty, Hilyard.
 
Old 09-02-2013, 11:27 AM   #4
basica
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For the average user, multiple partitions are probably not that advantageous; especially if they're all on the same disk. Generally, if you have a swap partition and a file partition; it will do the job nicely. The links hilyard provided go into a bit more depth though so I recommend you read them.
 
Old 09-02-2013, 01:59 PM   #5
yancek
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It depends upon what you use the computer for and the type of data. If you have a lot of movies, photos, music or files such as pdf you could put them on a separate partition and when you re-install a new system, you don't have to back them up as long as you make sure you install the new system to the same / partition as the previous.
 
Old 09-02-2013, 03:31 PM   #6
jefro
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The general notion came from long ago where a large system may have 30 or so drives. It turned into some benefit for many complex systems and some home users to manage space and manage backups.

Partitions may be on different hard drives, they may allow for expansion/movement and recovery/backup more easily. It may be that one wants to boot to many installs or different types of installs that use same mount points. Consider maybe one might use a raid array for /home or such. One might use a networked folder or drive for other needs like /data. Almost unlimited uses

For the most part you look at a partition as a resource and match it to your needs.


Most common users don't need special mounts. There are cases were mounts like /boot are needed to get the system to work at all.
 
Old 09-03-2013, 12:01 PM   #7
DavidMcCann
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The Wikipedia article misses out the usual reason for Linux: having a separate /home partition so that you can re-install on / without deleting all your data. Not every Linux distro will do an update: some expect you to re-install a new version from scratch. And even if your distro will update, you might want to change some day.

Most modern computers are large enough not to need swap, unless you want to hibernate. On the other hand, some distros insist on a swap partition.

So, the recommended set up for PCs (as opposed to servers) is
1. /
2. /home
3. swap
 
  


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