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Old 08-20-2011, 10:15 AM   #1
tcharmon
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Partition Help


I have just recently replaced my WinXP operating system on my PC with Ubuntu 11.04. I have a 500GB and a 80GB hard drives in my system. I have put my Linux OS and all system files on my 500.. How can I properly partition my 80GB HD in Linux just so can have normal storage without system files.. I would like to put MP3 files on that HD.. Any help would be greatly appreciated..
 
Old 08-20-2011, 10:36 AM   #2
markush
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Hello tcharmon,

provided there's nothing on the 80GB drive and you need one partition on it:
Code:
fdisk /dev/sd?
where ? is the 80GB drive. delete any partitions on it, create a new one (or more if you want) change the partition-id to 83 (if it is not yet 83).
After leavin fdisk you create a new filesystem on it
Code:
mke2fs -t ext4 /dev/sd?1
afterwards you create a directory where you can mount it
Code:
mkdir /usr/local/MyMusic
edit /etc/fstab and add a line
Code:
/dev/sd?1   /usr/local/MyMusic   ext4   defaults    1   2
and mount it
Code:
mount /usr/local/MyMusic
It will be mounted automatically when you boot your system the next time.

be sure not to confuse the drives when using fdisk and mke2fs!!!

Markus
 
Old 08-20-2011, 05:16 PM   #3
allwimb
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you can use gparted to partitionate your hard disk. it's a graphical tool

spring logout

Last edited by allwimb; 12-12-2011 at 06:46 AM.
 
Old 08-20-2011, 05:30 PM   #4
lucasj
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Hi tcharmon


You don't need to create partitions on your 80GB disk. Just create a file system on this disk, mount and use it.

example: mkfs.ext4 /dev/sdXXX

But if you really want to have partitions on your disk you can use application called cfdisk

example: cfdisk /dev/sdXXX
 
Old 08-20-2011, 05:34 PM   #5
markush
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucasj View Post
You don't need to create partitions on your 80GB disk. Just create a file system on this disk, mount and use it.
One needs at least one partition on a drive in order to create a file-system. Or in other words: you can create filesystems only on partitions, not on the raw device.

Markus
 
Old 08-20-2011, 05:44 PM   #6
lucasj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markush View Post
One needs at least one partition on a drive in order to create a file-system. Or in other words: you can create filesystems only on partitions, not on the raw device.

Markus
No. You can create filesystem on raw disk.


g14x:~ # cat /proc/partitions
major minor #blocks name

8 0 52428800 sda
8 1 52420063 sda1
8 16 52428800 sdb
8 17 52420063 sdb1
8 32 104857600 sdc
g14x:~ # mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdc
mke2fs 1.41.9 (22-Aug-2009)
/dev/sdc is entire device, not just one partition!
Proceed anyway? (y,n) y
Filesystem label=
OS type: Linux
Block size=4096 (log=2)
Fragment size=4096 (log=2)
6553600 inodes, 26214400 blocks
1310720 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user
First data block=0
Maximum filesystem blocks=4294967296
800 block groups
32768 blocks per group, 32768 fragments per group
8192 inodes per group
Superblock backups stored on blocks:
32768, 98304, 163840, 229376, 294912, 819200, 884736, 1605632, 2654208,
4096000, 7962624, 11239424, 20480000, 23887872

Writing inode tables: done
Creating journal (32768 blocks): done
Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done

This filesystem will be automatically checked every 28 mounts or
180 days, whichever comes first. Use tune2fs -c or -i to override.
g14x:~ # mkdir /mnt/temp
g14x:~ # mount /dev/sdc /mnt/temp/
g14x:~ # mount
/dev/sda1 on / type ext3 (rw,acl,user_xattr)
proc on /proc type proc (rw)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw)
debugfs on /sys/kernel/debug type debugfs (rw)
devtmpfs on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,mode=0755)
tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,mode=1777)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,mode=0620,gid=5)
/dev/sdb1 on /REPOSITORY type xfs (rw)
fusectl on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw)
securityfs on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw)
gvfs-fuse-daemon on /home/lucas/.gvfs type fuse.gvfs-fuse-daemon (rw,nosuid,nodev,user=lucas)
/dev/sdc on /mnt/temp type ext3 (rw)
g14x:~ #
 
Old 08-20-2011, 06:14 PM   #7
jschiwal
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IMHO having at least one partition is the norm. You could run in to problems where at least on partition is assumed. For example, auto mounting.

I think mounting the filesystem with the MP3s in one's own home directory for a single user system or under /home/ for a shared system would be better. /usr/local is equivalent to /usr/ except the files there are built from source instead of installed from package. You wouldn't have user writable directories in /usr/. Simply locate it were you would had it been simply a directory. In other words, if the OP had a 530 GB drive, where would the directory for mp3's be located?

I have a $HOME/podcasts NFS share mounted. I forget that it is a mounted filesystem, and use it as if it were simply another directory. It shouldn't matter to the users.
 
Old 08-20-2011, 08:45 PM   #8
frankbell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucasj View Post
No. You can create filesystem on raw disk.
One can do many things. That doesn't mean it's necessarily a good idea to do them.

The warning message in the dialog is there for a reason.
 
  


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