LinuxQuestions.org
Download your favorite Linux distribution at LQ ISO.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 02-16-2017, 01:44 AM   #1
Naveenreddy6
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2017
Posts: 4

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
os problem


hi I am new to linux os. how i can install linux flavours in windows laptops or dos versions
 
Old 02-16-2017, 01:58 AM   #2
WaterCatapult
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2017
Location: Germany
Distribution: Mint 18.3 KDE, Kubuntu 18.04 LTS, Raspbian
Posts: 84

Rep: Reputation: 17
Good morning and welcome to the crowd,

basically, it depends on what your computer is made of and what drives can be used.
Does your laptop have a DVD drive or just USB ports?
Is it still using an older 32bit processor or already one that features 64bit support.

Is the system using traditional BIOS or UEFI?

Also what do you expect GNU/Linux to do and what not?
Last but not least, how important is the usability and UI known from Windows to you?
Keep in mind there are "some" different user interfaces available that all behavior more or less different.

I won't do any distro recommendations at this point but these days you can basically grab the ISO off a distributions homepage that's fitting your computer, burn it either to disc or copy to USB drives using tools such as Unetbootin and start through.


Kind regards,
WaterCatapult

Last edited by WaterCatapult; 02-16-2017 at 02:02 AM.
 
Old 02-16-2017, 03:22 AM   #3
hazel
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2016
Location: Harrow, UK
Distribution: LFS, AntiX, Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,031
Blog Entries: 11

Rep: Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226Reputation: 2226
Most linux distros these days have an installation image that can also be used as a live disc. Boot from it and you can explore the user interface and the available software before deciding whether or not to install it to your hard drive.

By the way, your post title is very uninformative. You should use titles that explain what you want us to tell you: for example, "How can I create and test Linux installation discs?"

Last edited by hazel; 02-16-2017 at 03:25 AM.
 
Old 02-16-2017, 03:44 AM   #4
pan64
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Location: Hungary
Distribution: debian/ubuntu/suse ...
Posts: 13,576

Rep: Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341
you do not need to install it first, but you can boot a live cd and test it (as it was mentioned in post #3). Also you can install it into a VM, if you have enough resources to run that (like virtualbox).
 
Old 02-16-2017, 04:48 AM   #5
Naveenreddy6
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2017
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by pan64 View Post
you do not need to install it first, but you can boot a live cd and test it (as it was mentioned in post #3). Also you can install it into a VM, if you have enough resources to run that (like virtualbox).
thanq for your answer,
I know the process with vm. But i want only ubuntu linux in my system.
 
Old 02-16-2017, 04:53 AM   #6
pan64
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Mar 2012
Location: Hungary
Distribution: debian/ubuntu/suse ...
Posts: 13,576

Rep: Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341Reputation: 4341
so there is a tool named wubi created for you:
http://askubuntu.com/questions/44948...04-lts-onwards
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 02-16-2017, 04:53 AM   #7
Naveenreddy6
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2017
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterCatapult View Post
Good morning and welcome to the crowd,

basically, it depends on what your computer is made of and what drives can be used.
Does your laptop have a DVD drive or just USB ports?
Is it still using an older 32bit processor or already one that features 64bit support.

Is the system using traditional BIOS or UEFI?

Also what do you expect GNU/Linux to do and what no?
Last but not least, how important is the usability and UI known from Windows to you?
Keep in mind there are "some" different user interfaces available that all behavior more or less different.

I won't do any distro recommendations at this point but these days you can basically grab the ISO off a distributions homepage that's fitting your computer, burn it either to disc or copy to USB drives using tools such as Unetbootin and start through.


Kind regards,
WaterCatapult


Thanq WaterCatapult,
i have both cd and usb ports.i want to learn about the falvours and usage of ubuntu linux.I want 64bit and i am using BIOS
 
Old 02-16-2017, 05:29 AM   #8
WaterCatapult
Member
 
Registered: Jan 2017
Location: Germany
Distribution: Mint 18.3 KDE, Kubuntu 18.04 LTS, Raspbian
Posts: 84

Rep: Reputation: 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by pan64 View Post
so there is a tool named wubi created for you:
http://askubuntu.com/questions/44948...04-lts-onwards
Notice that Wubi no longer is under active development.
It's a way to load buntu off the Windows bootloader but it might struggle with more recent systems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Naveenreddy6 View Post
Thanq WaterCatapult,
i have both cd and usb ports.i want to learn about the falvours and usage of ubuntu linux.I want 64bit and i am using BIOS
That's good, so you can basically decide yourself what works best.
Even better you're having a more recent laptop and not yet UEFI in use.

So depending on you either USB or DVD will work fine but what media you use is entirely up to you.

Speaking of Ubuntu itself, it's basically a GNU/Linux distro like most with a huge userbase that's also available to help you with issues.
You most likely recognize Ubuntu by its unique user interface that is (except for Arch) an exclusive product yet other interfaces can be used as well.
Software is cross comptible with other GNU/Linux distros - preferably if it's made for Debian and Debian based distributions - and if you still need newer software there's the repository system called PPA which allows you to install newer software packages than what's available in the official repository for your version.
As of being up-to-date, Linux also wants to be updated and upgraded, just like Apple's macOS or Microsoft's Windows but if you stay with special labeled LTS releases of Ubuntu, you'll run fine for the next couple of years without worrying about if and how you switch to another version (like you would do when upgrading from WinXP to 8 for example).

One thing you should keep in mind though that GNU/Linux although being similar in desktop usage IS NOT macOS or Windows and vice versa.
All the developers try to make the system as easy to use yet functional at all time but if you expect it to be a 1:1 replacement you're better off to stay with your current operating system.

Other users already recommended you to run Ubuntu as a Live system or from within a virtual machine of which both variants won't break your computer, that's something I'd recommend too!
Running the live system is a bit slower as it needs to load data from the disc or usb drive but shows how GNU/Linux would perform on your hardware, virtual machines run from within macOS and Windows but you'll need to set up the VM the way you can work with it as it takes available resources that could also be used by other software.

In the end the choice is up to you.

Oh and another thing...
Not every distribution works cooperates just as good with your hardware as others.
Possibly Ubuntu won't do the job, maybe WiFi doesn't work but that doesn't mean openSUSE would give you the same results.
Definitely try multiple distributions before judging.


Kind regards,
WaterCatapult
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 02-16-2017, 05:35 AM   #9
Naveenreddy6
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Feb 2017
Posts: 4

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by WaterCatapult View Post
Notice that Wubi no longer is under active development.
It's a way to load buntu off the Windows bootloader but it might struggle with more recent systems.


That's good, so you can basically decide yourself what works best.
Even better you're having a more recent laptop and not yet UEFI in use.

So depending on you either USB or DVD will work fine but what media you use is entirely up to you.

Speaking of Ubuntu itself, it's basically a GNU/Linux distro like most with a huge userbase that's also available to help you with issues.
You most likely recognize Ubuntu by its unique user interface that is (except for Arch) an exclusive product yet other interfaces can be used as well.
Software is cross comptible with other GNU/Linux distros - preferably if it's made for Debian and Debian based distributions - and if you still need newer software there's the repository system called PPA which allows you to install newer software packages than what's available in the official repository for your version.
As of being up-to-date, Linux also wants to be updated and upgraded, just like Apple's macOS or Microsoft's Windows but if you stay with special labeled LTS releases of Ubuntu, you'll run fine for the next couple of years without worrying about if and how you switch to another version (like you would do when upgrading from WinXP to 8 for example).

One thing you should keep in mind though that GNU/Linux although being similar in desktop usage IS NOT macOS or Windows and vice versa.
All the developers try to make the system as easy to use yet functional at all time but if you expect it to be a 1:1 replacement you're better off to stay with your current operating system.

Other users already recommended you to run Ubuntu as a Live system or from within a virtual machine of which both variants won't break your computer, that's something I'd recommend too!
Running the live system is a bit slower as it needs to load data from the disc or usb drive but shows how GNU/Linux would perform on your hardware, virtual machines run from within macOS and Windows but you'll need to set up the VM the way you can work with it as it takes available resources that could also be used by other software.

In the end the choice is up to you.

Oh and another thing...
Not every distribution works cooperates just as good with your hardware as others.
Possibly Ubuntu won't do the job, maybe WiFi doesn't work but that doesn't mean openSUSE would give you the same results.
Definitely try multiple distributions before judging.


Kind regards,
WaterCatapult



Thanks,
we can not install ubuntu linux without virtual machine(VM) in my laptop.My lap is Dell vostro.
 
Old 02-16-2017, 09:12 AM   #10
TB0ne
LQ Guru
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
Distribution: SuSE, RedHat, Slack,CentOS
Posts: 22,308

Rep: Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008Reputation: 6008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naveenreddy6 View Post
Thanks,
we can not install ubuntu linux without virtual machine(VM) in my laptop.My lap is Dell vostro.
You said before:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naveenreddy6
I know the process with vm. But i want only ubuntu linux in my system.
If you ONLY want Ubuntu on your system, the process is simple:
  • Put in installation media
  • Answer questions/follow instructions
That's it. The installer will format your drive, and install Ubuntu for you, leaving you with only Ubuntu installed. No need for VM or anything else, but your post isn't clear on what you're really after. If you want Ubuntu as your main OS, that's fine...you can easily install virtualbox on Ubuntu, and load up many other distros of Linux in that.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
UEFI problem, GRUB2 problem, blank screen problem, :( JackDinn Linux - Newbie 22 05-26-2015 02:57 PM
Do I have a path problem, an Apache2 problem or a Javascript problem or any other pro rblampain Linux - Networking 0 12-29-2010 04:50 AM
Sound Card problem(every time i install linux i have diffirent hardware problem) jacka1l Linux - Newbie 7 08-11-2005 07:10 AM
Lan configuration problem - NFS boot problem - RX&TX packets errors 242VDM242 Linux - Networking 4 11-25-2004 02:35 PM
perl problem? apache problem? cgi problem? WorldBuilder Linux - Software 1 09-17-2003 08:45 PM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:03 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration