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Old 08-26-2014, 11:59 PM   #1
sir_mike
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Noob to linux and this forum! I cant share files from Mint 17 to Windows 7 and 8 pc!


Hi everyone!

I just signed up here and also I am a noob when it comes to linux. I have played with linux on/off for about 10-15 years but usually it is a for only a short time and then I am forced to go back to windows for completing tasks and printing!

I just decided to get back into linux or should I say try to get back into linux so I picked up a Core 2 Quad and installed Mint 17. I installed it on a 200g drive that had nothing else on it til I used gParted from a Puppy boot disk to make a data drive partition of 120gigs and formatted it using NTFS so hopefully my windows boxes would see it. I tried to setup Samba to share the data drive out but to no luck. My Mint box can see the windows shares but not the other way around. I copied about 60gig of files, pics, etc. to the "Mint Files" shared drive but no matter what I try, I cannot get it to share!

I love linux but it just doesnt seem to love me! I have to use windows to print cause my printer isnt linux friendly!

Thx. for any and all help in advance!
 
Old 08-27-2014, 02:03 AM   #2
xode
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Do you have just the one computer with the 200 GB hard drive or are there more computers?
 
Old 08-27-2014, 11:15 AM   #3
sir_mike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xode View Post
Do you have just the one computer with the 200 GB hard drive or are there more computers?
I have more than one. I have this core 2 quad with Mint 17, one Core i5 windows 7 pc, one Core i5 windows 8 pc and one windows 8 tablet.

I cannot get any windows pc/tablet to connect to the Mint 17 shared data folder thru samba.

Thx.

P.S. I was a fan of SuSe til they went to OpenSuse, then it didnt seem the same to me anyway!

Last edited by sir_mike; 08-27-2014 at 11:17 AM.
 
Old 08-27-2014, 11:55 AM   #4
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

Welcome to LQ!

Do you have the 'smb.conf' setup? 'man smb.conf';
Quote:
NAME
smb.conf - The configuration file for the Samba suite

SYNOPSIS
The smb.conf file is a configuration file for the Samba suite. smb.conf contains runtime configuration information for the Samba programs. The
smb.conf file is designed to be configured and administered by the swat(8) program. The complete description of the file format and possible
parameters held within are here for reference purposes.

FILE FORMAT
The file consists of sections and parameters. A section begins with the name of the section in square brackets and continues until the next section
begins. Sections contain parameters of the form:

name = value

The file is line-based - that is, each newline-terminated line represents either a comment, a section name or a parameter.

Section and parameter names are not case sensitive.

Only the first equals sign in a parameter is significant. Whitespace before or after the first equals sign is discarded. Leading, trailing and
internal whitespace in section and parameter names is irrelevant. Leading and trailing whitespace in a parameter value is discarded. Internal
whitespace within a parameter value is retained verbatim.

Any line beginning with a semicolon (";") or a hash ("#") character is ignored, as are lines containing only whitespace.

Any line ending in a "\" is continued on the next line in the customary UNIX fashion.

The values following the equals sign in parameters are all either a string (no quotes needed) or a boolean, which may be given as yes/no, 1/0 or
true/false. Case is not significant in boolean values, but is preserved in string values. Some items such as create masks are numeric.
Slackware's '/etc/samba/smb.conf-sample;
Quote:
# This is the main Samba configuration file. You should read the
# smb.conf(5) manual page in order to understand the options listed
# here. Samba has a huge number of configurable options (perhaps too
# many!) most of which are not shown in this example
#
# For a step to step guide on installing, configuring and using samba,
# read the Samba-HOWTO-Collection. This may be obtained from:
# http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/Samb...Collection.pdf
#
# Many working examples of smb.conf files can be found in the
# Samba-Guide which is generated daily and can be downloaded from:
# http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/Samba-Guide.pdf
#
# Any line which starts with a ; (semi-colon) or a # (hash)
# is a comment and is ignored. In this example we will use a #
# for commentry and a ; for parts of the config file that you
# may wish to enable
#
# NOTE: Whenever you modify this file you should run the command "testparm"
# to check that you have not made any basic syntactic errors.
#
Be sure to look at: http://www.samba.org/samba/docs/Samba-Guide.pdf to aid in creating your 'smb.conf' file. Be sure to check if your distribution has a '/etc/samba/smb.conf-sample' file to help get you started properly. Just do as root 'cp /etc/samba/smb.conf-sample /etc/samb/smb.conf' so you can configure the new file as needed for your install.

Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
 
Old 08-27-2014, 12:01 PM   #5
sir_mike
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@onebuck!

Thanks for the welcome!

I really have no idea what is in the config file. I used a graphic window to setup, which asked for user, path for share, etc. I can try to see what it says.

My goal is to use the Mint 17 box as a file/print server (once I get print issues solved too) so I can just access my files using my win 8 tablet, which I am online most of the time with and also just use the Mint box to play/surf/learn linux on!
 
Old 08-27-2014, 01:13 PM   #6
xode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_mike View Post

...I picked up a Core 2 Quad and installed Mint 17. I installed it on a 200g drive that had nothing else on it til I used gParted from a Puppy boot disk to make a data drive partition of 120gigs and formatted it using NTFS so hopefully my windows boxes would see it.
There is no need to create a separate NTFS data partition for samba. Samba works with linux folders directly and will allow your windows computers to access linux folders of your choice as windows network drives. My recommendation is that you get rid of that NTFS partition that you created under Mint and return the entire 200 GB back to Mint.
 
Old 08-27-2014, 01:18 PM   #7
sir_mike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xode View Post
There is no need to create a separate NTFS data partition for samba. Samba works with linux folders directly and will allow your windows computers to access linux folders of your choice as windows network drives. My recommendation is that you get rid of that NTFS partition that you created under Mint and return the entire 200 GB back to Mint.
Should I format the partition as something other than "NTFS". I wanted to keep a seperate partition in case I had to reinstall Mint 17 or if I decided to install another distro like Ubuntu, which I thought about so I wanted to keep my "data" drive/folder seperate.

Does that make sense?

Thx.
 
Old 08-27-2014, 01:21 PM   #8
xode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_mike View Post
@onebuck!

Thanks for the welcome!

I really have no idea what is in the config file. I used a graphic window to setup, which asked for user, path for share, etc. I can try to see what it says.

My goal is to use the Mint 17 box as a file/print server (once I get print issues solved too) so I can just access my files using my win 8 tablet, which I am online most of the time with and also just use the Mint box to play/surf/learn linux on!
Once you remove that NTFS partition, you can return to that graphic window in your Mint control panel to choose which linux folders you want to share. Examples of linux folders are: /home/genericuser/Documents/Workspace

However, there are other considerations as well. What does your network look like? What IP addresses are assigned to what computers and how are they assigned? Do the firewalls on all of the computers allow access between computers?
 
Old 08-27-2014, 01:29 PM   #9
sir_mike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xode View Post
Once you remove that NTFS partition, you can return to that graphic window in your Mint control panel to choose which linux folders you want to share. Examples of linux folders are: /home/genericuser/Documents/Workspace

However, there are other considerations as well. What does your network look like? What IP addresses are assigned to what computers and how are they assigned? Do the firewalls on all of the computers allow access between computers?
Just a home network with wireless and all other computers share files and the printer. I had all my data files on win 7 desktop, then transferred them to Mint so I could just use the Mint desktop and not have to have two desktops on just to share/print.

I keep everything on a data drive and no files are kept on individual desktops or tablets so only have to backup one spot.

What about the seperate "data" partition even in Mint. If I do it your way, wouldnt I lose my data if I had to reinstall Mint if it was all just on the 200g drive with a shared folder?
 
Old 08-27-2014, 01:38 PM   #10
xode
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sir_mike View Post
Should I format the partition as something other than "NTFS". I wanted to keep a seperate partition in case I had to reinstall Mint 17 or if I decided to install another distro like Ubuntu, which I thought about so I wanted to keep my "data" drive/folder seperate.

Does that make sense?

Thx.
NTFS is a lot less flexible and much more messy than linux ext3 or ext4. Further, having a separate partition in and of itself just for your windows computers is more messy than simply using a dedicated folder under /home (e.g. /home/windatafolder). Instead, you can use the power of the linux install program and the power of how linux manages its file system and simply create a separate partition for /home as a whole. Since linux innately recognizes the required existence of /home, making /home a separate partition will tell linux to automatically manage it, meaning you don't have to manually manage it. Then, the linux install program will allow you to keep (i.e. not wipe out /home) if and when you reinstall, which will accomplish your purpose here plus you will be able to keep all of your user information as well. As a general rule, I tell the install program to create separate partitions for /, swap, /usr, /var and /home.
 
Old 08-27-2014, 01:44 PM   #11
sir_mike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xode View Post
NTFS is a lot less flexible and much more messy than linux ext3 or ext4. Further, having a separate partition in and of itself just for your windows computers is more messy than simply using a dedicated folder under /home (e.g. /home/windatafolder). Instead, you can use the power of the linux install program and the power of how linux manages its file system and simply create a separate partition for /home as a whole. Since linux innately recognizes the required existence of /home, making /home a separate partition will tell linux to automatically manage it, meaning you don't have to manually manage it. Then, the linux install program will allow you to keep (i.e. not wipe out /home) if and when you reinstall, which will accomplish your purpose here plus you will be able to keep all of your user information as well. As a general rule, I tell the install program to create separate partitions for /, swap, /usr, /var and /home.
I dont know how to setup that up initially during install. Can I use gParted to shrink my "data" drive and give the space to Mint, then copy my files over from the NTFS partition to a folder within Mint, then delete the NTFS partition?

Also, wouldnt my "shared Mint file folder" show up in my windows "network"?

Thx.

Last edited by sir_mike; 08-27-2014 at 01:46 PM. Reason: added question
 
Old 08-27-2014, 02:46 PM   #12
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

You can have a 'NTFS' partition that can be read/write by your MS/Win OS and the Gnu/Linux install. If you decide to use a EXT2/3/4 for that partition you will need utilities on the MS machine to read/write to the EXT filesystem. You can use 'NTFS-3g' for the Linux system to read/write to the shared NTFS partition.

You can have your '/home' on a separate partition but if you expect to have another Gnu/Linux installed on the machine in a dual boot then you can get into problems using the same '/home' between different installs.
Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
 
Old 08-27-2014, 03:10 PM   #13
sir_mike
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Hi,

You can have a 'NTFS' partition that can be read/write by your MS/Win OS and the Gnu/Linux install. If you decide to use a EXT2/3/4 for that partition you will need utilities on the MS machine to read/write to the EXT filesystem. You can use 'NTFS-3g' for the Linux system to read/write to the shared NTFS partition.

You can have your '/home' on a separate partition but if you expect to have another Gnu/Linux installed on the machine in a dual boot then you can get into problems using the same '/home' between different installs.
Hope this helps.
Have fun & enjoy!
I have heard that about the shared /home and I dont want that. I want a Data drive/partition that is shared with whatever linux distro I am using, if I have more than one installed. This is one reason for me creating a seperate partition for the data drive and the other is in case I have something go wrong where I have to reinstall linux and dont want my data drive wiped out in the process.

I just created a "data drive within the Mint 17 home folder but cant seem to be able to right click and share it out either. I was able to go this before so why cant I do it now. Is it possible when I did some updating it changed something with my folders/permissions?

Thx.
 
Old 08-27-2014, 03:20 PM   #14
suicidaleggroll
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Hi,

You can have a 'NTFS' partition that can be read/write by your MS/Win OS and the Gnu/Linux install. If you decide to use a EXT2/3/4 for that partition you will need utilities on the MS machine to read/write to the EXT filesystem. You can use 'NTFS-3g' for the Linux system to read/write to the shared NTFS partition.
Only if that Windows system is local, which it's not in the OP's case. If it's accessing the drive through SAMBA then it doesn't matter, SAMBA handles the translation.
 
Old 08-27-2014, 03:30 PM   #15
onebuck
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Member Response

Hi,

I have used 'NFS' and Samba without issues for sharing filesystems.
 
  


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