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Old 08-24-2018, 10:01 AM   #1
Dan998
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Unhappy No package knockd available.


I am a software Engineering Student and i was intrested in the field of Server Security so I bought a Book Linux Server Security Hack and Defend By Chris Binnie. The book guided readers according to the commands of debian and redhat Linux so in order to learn it installed redhat Linux 7 onto my pc on dual boot(Since i was not able to install debian it was asking for some non free firware).So according to the book I have to install knockd package in order to learn port knocking but when i enter
yum install knockd

it gives No package knockd available.

Now i have tried a few stuff to fix this like going into yum.repo.d and enabling everything that was enable=0(which was a lot) and even after all that it gives the same message.I dont understand what i am doing wrong.... Any Help would be appreciated
 
Old 08-24-2018, 12:19 PM   #2
scasey
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knockd appears not to be in the CentOS 7 repositories. You'd need to download and install it from its website...which I found with a search of the net for knockd
 
Old 08-24-2018, 01:21 PM   #3
Turbocapitalist
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You can implement the same thing using iptables alone, but port knocking is not so useful. What problem are you trying to solve?
 
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Old 08-25-2018, 05:40 AM   #4
Dan998
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I see ,well i am coming to the conclusion that the book i am reading is quite outdated... So can any of you guys guide me to some tutorials or a book through which i can learn more about Linux Security which is relevant for recent versions.
 
Old 08-25-2018, 05:58 AM   #5
Turbocapitalist
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So I would ask from from which perspective you intend to approach the task? You can approach proper design and implementation from the perspective of a random desktop user, a random (desktop|embeded|server) system administrator, a user-space application developer (desktop|embedded|server), a systems developer, a kernel developer, or maybe a few others.

Which activities are interesting to you personally? Starting there might be easiest for you.

Putting on a generic system administrator hat, I'd say that familiarity with the proper functioning of your systems is the first prerequisite. You have to know what is normal behavior in the logs and elsewhere in order to spot something that is wrong. Narrowing that somewhat, as far as tools go, the top three tools to start with would be OpenSSH (both client usage and configuration of server and client), sudo (meaning customizing the heck out of /etc/sudoers), and shell scripting (POSIX not Bash). Other people may have different priorities, other than system administration, such as development.

I've observed over time, mostly from observing others, that security is a side effect of proper design and proper implementation of said design. The idea that security is bolted on after a system is designed is rather foreign to computing and probably stems from the spread of M$ and its ongoing attempts to displace computing. A week of coding will save a few hours of planning it is said.
 
Old 08-25-2018, 09:03 AM   #6
Dan998
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I see.... Well I am ready to act upon your advice to learn proper functioning of the system. So where do I start to learn those tools you have mentioned
 
Old 08-25-2018, 09:27 AM   #7
Turbocapitalist
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For OpenSSH the manual pages are quite good and one of the best resources, especially for ssh, ssh_config, and sshd_config. (Or type "man ssh", "man ssh_config", or "man sshd_config". ) There's also a wikibook on OpenSSH or if you prefer a paper copy see instead SSH Mastery by Michael W Lucas. Try out some of the scenarios using a spare machine and/or doing more tasks remotely.

For configuring /etc/sudoers, a good source would be the presentation by Michael W Lucas called sudo: You're Doing It Wrong (video) (slides) or his book sudo Mastery. The manual page for sudoers is a bit overwhelming.

For shell scripting, there are very many guides and tutorials, but for bash, specifically, Greg Wooledge's Bash Guide, Bash FAQ, and Bash Pitfalls. Those are all Bash however. A main point is to keep in mind that there are many shells and that Bash is just one of the more common ones at least in GNU/Linux. The portable foundation is the POSIX base common to them. If you have time and patience for videos, the first part of Michael MacInnis: Oh a new Unix shell from BSDCan 2018 covers the history of UNIX shells in general. The shell is both a useful scripting language and a powerful, refined interface.

Again, others will have different priorities but those three topics are what I see as the foundation from which to branch out.
 
Old 08-25-2018, 12:12 PM   #8
Rickkkk
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Hey Dan998,

I'm not suggesting this resource to encourage you to use the distro I use, but the Arch Linux Wiki has some excellent, "cross-distro-applicable" information on a wide variety of linux topics, including those suggested by Turbocapitalist.

You could give it a look and see if you find it useful.

https://wiki.archlinux.org/

Cheers - let us know if there's anything specific that comes up.
 
  


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