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Old 10-22-2019, 05:50 PM   #1
SnxWe13
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Talking "Newbie_Here"


Hello fellow Linux bro's.. I've been using Ubuntu for about a month now.
I absolutely love it! So much better than Window's, and I feel like I'm
in more control over my system which I'm all about that. It's really cool that I can configure just about anything which brings me to my question. What steps do I need to take to become more proficient at using Linux. For example Configuring files, networking, security and shell scripting. Where should I start? Where did you guys start? And how long did it take to become Linux bad*$$"s?
 
Old 10-22-2019, 08:07 PM   #2
Firerat
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the simple answer is, just do stuff


way back in the late 90's my Linux Mission started with getting quake ( first person shooter ) running on Linux
The reason?
I had this naive idea that since the quake servers were running on Linux that if I had a Linux OS I would some how getting a better ping.

silly

but here is the thing, to achieve that goal I had to do many things
Like install Linux for one, dual boot as quake was already working on my win98
This involved booting a floppy ( ask your grandparents ) and using a program called fips to resize my existing partitions ( after first defragging on win98 )

once installed, I had to get the dial up internet working ( again, grandparents might be able to explain that )
of course I needed a web browser, enter netscape navigator ( I do hope your grandparents were exposed to IT back then )

I also needed email and newsgroups ( newsgroups were basically forums of the day )

and I also needed to get my sound, and Voodoo 3DFX OpenGL card card running right, and of course Quake.

eventually I was able to play Quake, it didn't improve my ping.. but I never needed to periodically quit quake and run some program to clear memory as I did with win98

from there I just found other things to do.

I can't tell you what you need to do, I have no idea what interests you.

if you ever get stuck achieving a goal, clearly state the goal and explain where you have got up to and where your are stuck and someone here will steer you in the right direction ( that mhigt be in a completely different direction to the way you were heading )

The world of GNU/Linux is vast, it has a reputation for being all about programming. It isn't, it is just a versatile tool.

If it lacks a feature it just means no one thought to try ( ok, that statement is a little open, but you get the spirit of the idea )
 
Old 10-22-2019, 09:14 PM   #3
jefro
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Not sure any user can ever be that good. It keeps changing everyday. What I learned decades ago is almost useless today. Lucky for me I forget most of it.

If you want to get to the nuts and bolts then try LFS at least once.
 
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:10 PM   #4
Slackware_fan_Fred
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jefro View Post
Not sure any user can ever be that good. It keeps changing everyday. What I learned decades ago is almost useless today. Lucky for me I forget most of it.

If you want to get to the nuts and bolts then try LFS at least once.
LFS? that's Madness
 
Old 10-22-2019, 11:12 PM   #5
frankbell
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I would not recommend LFS to a new Linux user. This statement is based on personal experience.
 
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Old 10-22-2019, 11:23 PM   #6
Slackware_fan_Fred
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankbell View Post
I would not recommend LFS to a new Linux user. This statement is based on personal experience.
Yeah LFS is for people that know a LOT about Linux and I'm not sure but knowing how to program may be needed.
I've always wanted to "make" LFS but knew it is way beyond my Knowledge.
I never recommend LFS to anyone, the one's who would want to use it would already know of it anyway and they would know what they are getting into. suggesting that is just going to turn people away from Linux since they will think that's how all Distros are like.
 
Old 10-23-2019, 02:49 AM   #7
Firerat
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I disagree

if the user expressed an interest in fast tracking understanding the core of a gnu/linux system I *would* recommend LFS ( Linux from Scratch )
It would depend on the user, some basic understanding of Linux would be a pre-requisite.

it is a step by step guide that introduces you to many things.

These days it is easier to play around with LFS in a Virtual Machine
( hardware is more powerful and harddrive space much greater than in the past )

recently I've been toying with the idea of LFS on lxc
I want to have ago at scripting the book ( writing a script that executes the scripts in the book )

but you should not do any form of ALFS ( Automated LFS ) until you have worked through LFS manually at least a few times

You should also try to avoid copy/pasting the book,
manually typing all the commands in while "alt tabbing" with the LFS book will help burn things into memory ( but it will take longer )
 
Old 10-23-2019, 03:09 AM   #8
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Firerat View Post
...
It would depend on the user, some basic understanding of Linux would be a pre-requisite.
...
Since the thread title suggests we are dealing with a "newbie", as in someone who is new to Linux; how's a complete "newbie" going to have "some basic understanding of Linux" ? They wouldn't be a "newbie" if they did...

Also, you don't need to do LFS to learn about Linux, they'll learn a lot by a combination of doing things, reading and then repeating that process until things do make more sense. I've never done LFS myself, it doesn't mean I don't know the boot process, or what an init system is and does, etc... you don't need to jump into the deep end to be able to learn that kind of stuff. You could also learn programming without doing LFS if they wanted to.
 
Old 10-23-2019, 04:49 AM   #9
Firerat
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsbjsb001 View Post
Since the thread title suggests we are dealing with a "newbie", as in someone who is new to Linux; how's a complete "newbie" going to have "some basic understanding of Linux" ? They wouldn't be a "newbie" if they did...

Also, you don't need to do LFS to learn about Linux, they'll learn a lot by a combination of doing things, reading and then repeating that process until things do make more sense. I've never done LFS myself, it doesn't mean I don't know the boot process, or what an init system is and does, etc... you don't need to jump into the deep end to be able to learn that kind of stuff. You could also learn programming without doing LFS if they wanted to.
do not pick out a single line
and consider the context of the whole thread
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firerat View Post
I disagree

if
the user expressed an interest in fast tracking understanding the core of a gnu/linux system I *would* recommend LFS ( Linux from Scratch )
It would depend on the user, some basic understanding of Linux would be a pre-requisite.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Firerat View Post
These days it is easier to play around with LFS in a Virtual Machine
which is going to prime a new user, they will have to get the VM working, and install a disto on the VM

All *before* the actual LFS stuff

your picking out a single line is just silly

Last edited by Firerat; 10-23-2019 at 04:59 AM.
 
Old 10-23-2019, 04:50 AM   #10
Lysander666
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When an OP asks for suggestions on what Linux distro is good for a newbie, there's often someone who suggests LFS. I concur that it's a poor suggestion for this reason: the likelihood of a new user - someone with little to no previous Linux/Unix experience - finding it too daunting whilst getting little enjoyment or progress out of it is way higher than if they use Ubuntu or Mint, either of which will cede rewards and productivity far earlier and thus encourage further progress. Likewise I would not recommend someone starting out on the piano to attempt to play Alkan's "Comme le Vent": the chance of them giving up altogether is just too high unless they're a prodigy. It's self-defeating.

Last edited by Lysander666; 10-23-2019 at 09:40 AM.
 
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Old 10-23-2019, 06:49 AM   #11
hazel
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To use LFS fruitfully, you need some familiarity with the command line. You need to be familiar with basic file system commands and know at least enough about things like grep and sed to know what they do, even if you don't know the correct syntax for invoking them (that's what the book is for). You need to understand how the directory tree works and what symbolic links are, and have a good understanding of file ownership and permissions. And you need to be aware of the basic steps in building software: unpack the tarball, switch into the new directory, configure, make, install, exit directory, delete directory. Everything else you need is in the book.

BUT: if you want to understand Linux as distinct from just using it, you are going to need most of these things anyway. So if a newbie wants and intends to learn, he or she may well be a candidate for LFS in due course. The book is very good. It should allow any user with the basics to get at least as far as making a bootable system.

In the meantime, I would recommend Debian or Devuan as a good step up from Ubuntu/Mint.
 
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Old 10-23-2019, 07:33 AM   #12
yancek
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Ubuntu is well documented so it is usually easier to find an answer to a problem/error by simply entering the error message in a browser. You could start by reading the Ubuntu Desktop Guide at the link below.

https://help.ubuntu.com/lts/ubuntu-help/index.html
 
Old 10-23-2019, 07:43 AM   #13
Lysander666
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When I was learning to use the command line, I found this page extremely useful for learning how to search for and install packages in Ubuntu:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AptGet/Howto
 
Old 10-23-2019, 07:53 AM   #14
jsbjsb001
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Firerat View Post
do not pick out a single line
My post broke no rules, so please don't tell me how to post.

Quote:
and consider the context of the whole thread
Yes, I have, including considering the OP too.

Quote:
which is going to prime a new user, they will have to get the VM working, and install a disto on the VM

All *before* the actual LFS stuff

your picking out a single line is just silly
Again, and as I've said to you in another post; I was talking about what I quoted. You're comment above is effectively saying something to the effect of "unless you agree with my whole post, then you've got no right to respond". This isn't how forums work, let alone this one. I think most people reading this thread would be smart enough to understand the point I was making when they look at both the likely experience, or more to the point, likely inexperience of the OP, as well as what I quoted (and particularly even highlighted in that same quote), and be able to put what I said into the "context" it was intended in. Particularly since the following posts from others make the point I was making before quite well.

For the record, I totally agree with those other members. Particularly in relation to command-line experience, as well as compiling and building software, particularly when one considers dependencies, as well as things like navigating the file system, permissions, etc. As said, those things are critical to understand, again, not things a complete "newbie" is likely to understand straight off the bat. I would therefore also add my voice to the OP starting off with a "newbie" distribution, such as, but not limited to Ubuntu, Linux Mint, etc.
 
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Old 10-23-2019, 11:33 AM   #15
rtmistler
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@Firerat and jsbjsb001,

Stop the fighting with each other in multiple threads, immediately.

To be clear, the rules about off-topic posts and conducting battles within technical threads are very much being broken.
 
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