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krakerjack 06-24-2006 11:15 AM

newbie choosing a linux version
 
Is there a chart that compares the qualities/advantages/etc of each version of linux?

what kind is most stable (less crashes)? and I'd like something to keep out hackers, spyware, virus, etc.

DrOzz 06-24-2006 11:19 AM

basically all them fit your description ;)

D00d, this question is probably asked about 5 times per day on this site, no jokes.

Just cause its my distro of choice, I am just going to say slackware as my recommendation. If you wanna stick to your Windows roots, choose something like Fedora or Mandriva or something.

krakerjack 06-24-2006 11:22 AM

sounds interesting, I had read somewhere that slackware dosent do or use something called dependancies. is this important? do other linux versions use it?

DrOzz 06-24-2006 11:31 AM

Lets flip the coin. If you are using slackware, and you use something like swaret then it'll take care of dependancies.

If you use something like fedora and you use yum, it will take care of the dependancies.

That would be the last thing on my mind to worry about is that. No matter what distro you use, you'll run into stupid little issues that will bug you at first, but either
A) you'll figure it out by yourself if you read what error is thrown at you
B) you will come on here, ask the question, and be given the solution.

Long and short of it, yes pretty much everything you install is going to be dependant on something to function.

The only time you'll run into the issue, no matter what distro, is when you try to install something, and it rely's on something, that you dont' have install, then you get the error that you don't have the dependant package

Then you just go get it. Or like said above, just use a package management system that will take care of that stuff for you.

d3L0s 06-24-2006 12:07 PM

When I first started using linux I began with SuSE. It was easy to set up and get going. Most of the config is done through a gui and not just editing files.

pixellany 06-24-2006 12:40 PM

Ubuntu is best.
We are all opinionated elitists.
One or both of the above is correct.

Seriously, there are a huge range of distros--hundreds--but there are not that many fundamental differences. Start with any one of the free versions: Ubuntu, Fedora, openSUSE, etc.

Distrowatch is a good place to see some comparisons.

About the dependencies---every new application you install will be dependent on one or more library functions. When you install with most package managers, that is taken care of for you automatically--except Slackware. They pride themselves in having a package manager that does NOT check the dependencies. Perhaps they are purists.

Pick something and dive in.

DrOzz 06-24-2006 12:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pixellany
When you install with most package managers, that is taken care of for you automatically--except Slackware. They pride themselves in having a package manager that does NOT check the dependencies. Perhaps they are purists.

BUT like I did mention, if you want to use something like Swaret when using slackware, it will resolve your dependencies, most often than none. Its just like any other, it depends on your repositories if your going to get it the majority of the time.

I forget the quote that some member used once on this forum, but if someone knows, I'll give the credit, but he/she once said :
Quote:

Originally Posted by unknown_member
If you want to learn Fedora, use Fedora
If you want to learn linux use Slackware

You can pretty much fill in the blank with almost any distro where I used Fedora ;)

koobi 06-24-2006 01:24 PM

How about this:
Comparison of Linux distributions

and look towards the bottom of this page for more info:
Linux

ozar 06-24-2006 01:49 PM

Why not try 3 or 4 different distros then make up your own mind which one is best for you and your needs?

You can take a look at DistroWatch.com for the top 20 or so distros and pick from those. They are all good, but different in varying ways.

Above all, have fun with Linux. :)

krakerjack 06-24-2006 02:41 PM

the linux comparison was interesting.

I guess I'll have to try out a few as recommended!

Thanks.

Michael_aust 06-24-2006 02:59 PM

the easier way is to just to try all of the top 10 distributions on the distrowatch site. With the exception og Gentoo (just personal opinion, I wouldnt give a new user gentoo as there first distro, not untl they get sued to how certain things work).


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