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Old 04-30-2016, 03:35 PM   #1
Goralla
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New to Linux, which version to use


Hello, i'm new to Linux,this website and these forums. I have always been a windows user, thinking Apple's OS was the only other option. A friend mentioned Linux, it sounded interesting. Over the next few days I did some soul searching. Could I really betray Windows like that? Absolutely, it was an easy decision. The next time I saw him, i asked a few questions. He had no answers, turns out the only thing he does know is that Linux is like Windows, but its very hard to use and configure. So I decided to take matters into my own hands with a few google searches, which led me here. I suppose what i'm looking for initially, is a version that is good for a noob like me. I have registered to take a CompTIA A+ class during the summer, but I don't want to wait until I start for some answers. Thanks for reading and I look forward to hearing some input.
 
Old 04-30-2016, 03:52 PM   #2
Drakeo
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In the beginning there was slackware. after using them all I returned to Slackware. Because I want to control every part of my system. I want it to do 20 times more than UBUNTU. I am biased ok. https://linuxcritic.wordpress.com/20...never-go-back/
 
Old 04-30-2016, 04:01 PM   #3
beachboy2
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Goralla,

Welcome to LQ.

It would be a good idea to let us have the make/model, amount of RAM, what CPU, wifi card etc you have before we give definite suggestions.

Despite Drakeo's love of Slackware (nothing wrong with that, or Arch), neither OS is recommended for beginners.

Assuming your hardware is reasonable, the obvious recommendation for a newcomer is Linux Mint 17.3, either MATE or Xfce.

Others include Ubuntu 16.04 MATE, Xubuntu 16.04, ZorinOS.

http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...xp-4175502495/

Last edited by beachboy2; 04-30-2016 at 04:03 PM.
 
Old 04-30-2016, 04:01 PM   #4
Michael Uplawski
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goralla View Post
I suppose what i'm looking for initially, is a version that is good for a noob like me. I have registered to take a CompTIA A+ class during the summer, but I don't want to wait until I start for some answers. Thanks for reading and I look forward to hearing some input.
The best Linux-version for a beginner is the one that is most used in your area, in your networks, by your friends, colleagues else people that you can contact to chat about their experience and yours. If most of your friends used SuSE, I would not, -here and now-, give you a list of things that I believe done wrong by whoever is behind SuSE these days... but recommend you to install SuSE, too.

If you lived nearby, I would recommend you the same Linux distribution that I use myself, but you do not and so I will not.
 
Old 04-30-2016, 04:04 PM   #5
salasi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goralla View Post
...but its very hard to use and configure....
So what you are saying is that he knows nothing. There is certainly a learning curve and this may even be more severe if you have become really habituated to the windows way of doing things.

I'd advise that you ought to try a few live CDs and see if anything seems to appeal.
 
Old 04-30-2016, 04:09 PM   #6
cwizardone
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Welcome.
As has been pointed out, Linux Mint is good for beginners, as is Zorin.
If you want to learn Linux and don't mind having to read and get your
hands dirty (work at it) Slackware is a good choice.
 
Old 04-30-2016, 04:45 PM   #7
arizonagroovejet
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwizardone View Post
As has been pointed out, Linux Mint is good for beginners,
Linux Mint is not good for anybody. They've had their forums hacked because they didn't bother to keep Wordpress up to date. Earlier this year their website was hacked and one of their iso downloads replaced with a trojaned version They blacklist upstream updates to prevent breakage. Don't use Mint. It's a derivative or a derivative maintained by people who are apparently barely have the time/resources to hold it all together.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cwizardone View Post
as is Zorin.
No. Because, WTF is Zorin?


If you're a newbie, start with a distro that a large number of people use. I'd say go with Fedora, openSUSE, Debian or Ubuntu. They are all long established, very well maintained and have a very large user base. Or as someone else very sensibly suggested, whatever people you know use, though if the people you know think "Linux is like Windows, but its very hard to use and configure" then I guess that's not really an option

Last edited by arizonagroovejet; 04-30-2016 at 04:49 PM. Reason: added: long establihed, well maintained, large user base
 
Old 04-30-2016, 04:48 PM   #8
yancek
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The best thing to do is your own research as you know what you want and what you will use the computer for. The link below has information on a number of Linux distributions and links to their home pages where you can get more details on each and/or download them. Take a look at the right side of the page under 'Page Hit Rankings' which give you a general idea of what the most popular Linux distributions are.

http://distrowatch.com

Quote:
Linux is like Windows, but its very hard to use and configure
Windows and Linux are both operating systems, not much similarity beyond that. Hard to configure? Ten or more years ago that was true. I think it is more difficult for an ex-windows user to use Linux than a complete novice because you have to 'unlearn' most of what you learned to use windows and then learn to use Linux.
 
Old 04-30-2016, 04:59 PM   #9
Goralla
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These are the specs from the manufactuer.

Performance
Processor 2.4 GHz Intel Core i7-4700MQ Quad-Core Haswell
Cache L3: 6 MB
Memory SO-DIMM 204-Pin Type: DDR3 SDRAM
Installed: 8 GB (1x8 GB)
Capacity: 32 GB
Graphics Card Type: Dedicated
Installed: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780M with 4 GB
Display
Type Widescreen
Size 17.3"
Backlight LED
Aspect Ratio 16:9
Finish Antiglare
Native Resolution 1920 x 1080
Storage
Hard Drive Installed: 1 TB 5400 rpm
Type: SATA
Optical Drive SuperMulti DVD Burner
Input/Output Connectors
Ports 3x USB 3.0 (A)
2x USB 2.0 (A)
Display 1x HDMI
1x Mini DisplayPort
1x VGA
Audio Integrated Stereo Speakers
Integrated Microphone
1x 1/8" (3.5 mm) Headphone Output
1x 1/8" (3.5 mm) Microphone Input
Flash Media Slot 1x MMC
1x SD
1x Memory Stick
1x xD-Picture Card
Communications
Network 10/100/1000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet (RJ-45)
Wi-Fi 802.11b/g/n
Bluetooth Bluetooth 4.0
Webcam Yes
General
Operating System Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit)
Security Not Specified By Manufacturer
Keyboard Keys: 102
Type: Standard Notebook Keyboard
Features: Backlight, Chiclet Style
Pointing Device TouchPad with Multi-Touch Control
Battery 9-Cell Lithium-Ion
Power Requirements AC: 100-240 VAC
Dimensions (WxHxD) 16.8 x 2.1 x 11.3" / 42.7 x 5.3 x 28.7 cm
Weight 7.9 lb / 3.58 kg

I doubled ram to 16 GB, and added a 750 GB solid state drive
 
Old 04-30-2016, 05:59 PM   #10
cwizardone
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@ arizonagroovejet,
You are entitled to your opinion.


@ yancek,

Good advice.
If I might add: At the top of the page at distrowatch.com is a link to the "Major Distributions." It gives you a little history about the 9 most popular and/or oldest
active Linux distributions and included in the list is FreeBSD.

https://distrowatch.com/dwres.php?resource=major

Last edited by cwizardone; 04-30-2016 at 06:07 PM.
 
Old 04-30-2016, 08:48 PM   #11
frankbell
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There are many threads here at LQ asking, "What's a good distro for someone new to Linux?" Use the LQ Search up on the menu to find some and read them. (You will likely find as many opinions as posters.)

I started with Slackware, quite by accident, but am glad I did, because Slackware teaches you to understand Linux. Once you learn how to Slack, no other distro will intimidate you.

Others I would recommend would be Mageia and Mint. OpenSUSE might also be worth a look.

(I don't think one should conflate the security of a website with that of a operating system, and Mint responded to the breach quickly and openly. Now, if the Mint website gets breached again, I may revise my opinion. Just my two cents.)
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-30-2016, 09:46 PM   #12
Ztcoracat
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Quote:
They've had their forums hacked because they didn't bother to keep Wordpress up to date.
Ok so humans do err and having their forms hacked has nothing to do with the stability of the Linux Mint distribution it's self. The fact that they didn't keep Wordpress up to date was irresponsible and could of been avoided. Prior preparation prevents poor performance.

I've been running Mint for 2 years and have never had a problem.

Zorin is a distribution based on Ubuntu and a lot of folks that came from Windows like it.
-::-Profanity is frowned upon here-::-

http://zorinos.com/
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-30-2016, 09:54 PM   #13
Ztcoracat
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Xubuntu and Mageia are neat distro's. I ran both of them and liked them.

https://www.mageia.org/en/
http://xubuntu.org/

Voyager is another neat distro that's build on Xubuntu and it was very stable and ran well for me a few years ago. It comes with some really amazing wallpapers and screensavers. The wifi worked right out of the box.

http://voyagerlive.org/
http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=voyager
 
Old 04-30-2016, 10:29 PM   #14
frankbell
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Most of the distros that I use regularly are not derivative, with the exception of Mint, which, AFAIC, is Ubuntu done right.

There must be some reason that I gravitate to Debian, Mageia, and Slackware, which are all originals in their way.

[RANT MODE ON]

Most of the *buntus are Ubuntu with different desktop environments. They are still Ubuntu underneath. Mint, I think, is an exception as it provides more functionality in some areas, particularly codecs, than Ubuntu, but, yes, it's still a *buntu. It just happens to be a *buntu that I like, and it's my party and I'll cry if I want to.

To be blunt, having a different DE is no big deal; it's like taking the chassis of a Chevy and dropping a Ford body on it--it's still a Chevy underneath. The fins and grill may be different, but the drive-train is the same. A new DE does not innovation make

I recognize that it's convenient for fans of various DEs, but, at the risk of offending fans of some distros, it's not at all ground-breaking; indeed, it's almost superficial. You could install your DE of choice to Ubuntu very nicely and make it work just fine.

Also, get off my lawn. Grump, grump, grump.

[RANT MODE OFF]

Last edited by frankbell; 04-30-2016 at 10:35 PM.
 
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Old 04-30-2016, 11:44 PM   #15
mralk3
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New to Linux, which version to use

I think everybody is providing great feedback. There is only one problem... the most important question has yet to be asked:

What tasks do you intend to accomplish with Linux?

If all you plan to do is check email, browse the web, graphic design, gaming, etc... mostly any distribution of Linux should suffice. If this is the case, hardware discovery should be your only concern.

I presently run Slackware. I started on Debian, then Slackware, Fedora, Ubuntu (back around 2005), then back to Debian, and finally found a home with Slackware. The Slackware community here on LQ is very helpful if you run into trouble.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
  


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