LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie
User Name
Password
Linux - Newbie This Linux forum is for members that are new to Linux.
Just starting out and have a question? If it is not in the man pages or the how-to's this is the place!

Notices


Reply
  Search this Thread
Old 07-23-2005, 12:57 AM   #16
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16

Thanks for all the support help guys.

Now, another few questions.

1) Hardware installation. Do you just install like you would with Windows?
2) Is there any type of Control Panels where i can view devices such as Printers and all?
3) Acessing Files such as mp3's from my HD. How is this done?

I have played around with this Ubuntu CDLive and i really like it.

I just picked up Arch Linux and KDE 3.4 from the magazine Linux Format which i will experiment with too.

Best adivce for my self i guess is to play around with various CDLives of different dist. to see which one i like best.

But my main concern is hardware installation and how you go about view all your devices through Linux.

Thanks again all, youve been a great help so far.

Last edited by JediDB; 07-23-2005 at 01:02 AM.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 01:02 AM   #17
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally posted by Nylex
You don't have to be a programmer to use Linux, either.
Good point. Yes, I have absolutely no programming experience, and I'm very happy with my first three months of Linux.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 01:12 AM   #18
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally posted by JediDB
1) Hardware installation. Do you just install like you would with Windows?
What do you mean by hardware installation? Do you mean like taking a screwdriver and opening your computer and affixing a new hard drive to your computer? Or are you talking about hardware recognition? If it's the latter, you just hope everything works. If it doesn't, you do LinuxQuestions searches and Google searches to figure out how to configure stuff.

Quote:
2) Is there any type of Control Panels where i can view devices such as Printers and all?
Yes, there almost always is. This is true for just about every major distro out there. Here's a screenshot of the KDE control center.

Quote:
3) Acessing Files such as mp3's from my HD. How is this done?
As I said before, distros like Mepis and Knoppix will automatically have your hard drive partitions appear on the desktop as icons.

Now MP3s... well, it's complicated. Technically, MP3 is proprietary software and a lot of distros don't come with support for MP3s out of the box (because these distros are free and so don't pay all the licensing fees). So you usually have to install lame or gstreamer-mad or some other MP3 encoder to be able to play MP3s. It's not as difficult as it sounds. You can do it through Synaptic, which is all GUI. Anyone who tells you software installation requires you to ./configure make make install or that there's all this "dependency hell" hasn't used Synaptic. Here are some screenshots of Synaptic

Quote:
Best adivce for my self i guess is to play around with various CDLives of different dist. to see which one i like best.
That sounds like a great plan.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 01:18 AM   #19
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Thanks for the quick response

Ok, KDE 3.4, im confused. Its this another version on Linux or extra software fpr your current version of Linux as reading the CD of KDE i just got says that its the new Desktop enviroment. This seems to sound like its like newer desktop themes like you can get for Windows.

Other software like games and such, do they install the same way the do on WIndows with a created short cut on your desktop to run the game or do you need to program all that?

Also, whats GUI mean?

Thanks again
 
Old 07-23-2005, 01:31 AM   #20
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally posted by JediDB
Ok, KDE 3.4, im confused. Its this another version on Linux or extra software fpr your current version of Linux as reading the CD of KDE i just got says that its the new Desktop enviroment. This seems to sound like its like newer desktop themes like you can get for Windows.
Themes and desktops are a bit different. It's kind of hard to explain because Windows has only one desktop environment with multiple themes. In Linux, there are multiple desktop environments, and each desktop environment also has multiple themes. KDE is known for being the most Windows-like of the desktop environments. It's also known for being the slowest (though, I hear the latest version of KDE--3.4?--is a lot faster than previous version). Within KDE, though, you can make your icons and window decorations and panel any theme you want. I'm a bit of a Mac-eye-candy-phile, so I put aqua themes on and download Mac-like icons. To see a bit of what this is like, check out http://www.gnome-look.org/ or http://www.kde-look.org/

Both sites are full of themes, icon sets, splash screens, and wallpapers.

Quote:
Other software like games and such, do they install the same way the do on WIndows with a created short cut on your desktop to run the game or do you need to program all that?
Well, it depends. What kinds of games are we talking about? Are we talking computer versions of board games (my favorite is Gnocatan, which is a Linux version of Settlers of Catan) or are we talking Doom 3? If you want simpler games, they usually install via Synaptic and create menu shortcuts (rarely do Linux distros create desktop shortcuts). Hardcore games you kind of have to take on a game by game basis. They may not even have a Linux port.

Quote:
Also, whats GUI mean?
GUI means graphical user interface. You may want to take a look at my Linux guide for Windows users (see my signature). It's written for people like you (i.e., me three months ago).
 
Old 07-23-2005, 01:40 AM   #21
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Hi again,

Yes, i like your links on your sig. I need to read these thoroughly as there a great source of info.

Now, back to KDE, can i just install that as my Linux OS or do i need to have another copy of Linux installed first such as Ubuntu as a CDLive or as a Full HD Installation?

My gamer question was for games such as Doom 3 ect.

I have spent about 12 hrs researching all the Linux stuff and man, its exciting and very fascinating. I can maybe see my WinXP just been used for games at this rate.

Only frustrating part for me though is that theres way so much to learn, and i have tons of questions still in my head lol.

I feel dumb asking all the noob question..... hope y'all dont mind
 
Old 07-23-2005, 01:53 AM   #22
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally posted by JediDB
Yes, i like your links on your sig. I need to read these thoroughly as there a great source of info.
The only reason I wrote that guide is that I couldn't find something like that when I first started using Linux a few months ago. Hopefully it'll be of some use to you.

Quote:
Now, back to KDE, can i just install that as my Linux OS or do i need to have another copy of Linux installed first such as Ubuntu as a CDLive or as a Full HD Installation?
Well, usually distros come with a default desktop environment. For example, if you install Ubuntu, your default desktop environment will be Gnome. If you install Mepis, your default desktop environment will be KDE. Now, that's just the default. You can certainly, in Ubuntu, download KDE. Then, when you get to the login screen, you can choose in "session type" whether you want a KDE session or a Gnome session (same for Mepis--you can download Gnome). Or, if you really like Ubuntu, they also make a flavor of Ubuntu called Kubuntu, which is Ubuntu except with a KDE default desktop.

Quote:
My gamer question was for games such as Doom 3 ect. I can maybe see my WinXP just been used for games at this rate.
I'll be perfectly honest--Linux is not for serious gaming. I think there was a thread around here somewhere that was like "what do you dual-boot to Windows for?" and most of the time it's gaming. For me, it's iTunes (Linux has some great music players, but I happen to have a soft spot for iTunes).

Quote:
I have spent about 12 hrs researching all the Linux stuff and man, its exciting and very fascinating. Only frustrating part for me though is that theres way so much to learn, and i have tons of questions still in my head lol. I feel dumb asking all the noob question..... hope y'all dont mind [/B]
I don't mind. You remind me of me three months ago. I still consider myself a "noob"; only now I'm a noob who can help out other noobs. Hopefully, in three months, you'll be doing the same.

I'd seriously recommend you start with Mepis, though. I did. It's a great transition from Windows--very user friendly, all point and click, but still very much Linux (unlike Linspire, which tries to hide the guts of Linux from you). After I got comfortable with Mepis, I moved on to Ubuntu, and I love it. Of course, the Ubuntu Guide was invaluable to instilling the love of Ubuntu in me. Ubuntu doesn't have as much automatic stuff (I did have to use the command-line quite a bit to configure things), but once it's up and running, it's very smooth.

Last edited by aysiu; 07-23-2005 at 01:55 AM.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 02:18 AM   #23
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Hi,

How does Mepis vary from Ubuntu? as when i ran the CDLive verison of Ubuntu, it regonised all my hardware and i was able to connect online instantly. I just couldnt figure out where a control would be for me to access my hardware and change settings.

How do you install printers and there software to Linux?

Also, when you dual boot, do you need extra software that enables you to choose which OS to boot from? I heard of people talk of a Grub (spl?)

Thats my last question before i go to bed, lol

Last edited by JediDB; 07-23-2005 at 02:19 AM.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 02:42 AM   #24
Nylex
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,464

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally posted by JediDB
Also, when you dual boot, do you need extra software that enables you to choose which OS to boot from? I heard of people talk of a Grub (spl?)
You don't need extra software. When you install Linux, a bootloader will be installed as well and that will let you choose between the operating systems you have installed. GRUB is a bootloader (GRand Unified Bootloader, IIRC), the other common one is LILO (LInux LOader).

Last edited by Nylex; 07-23-2005 at 03:13 AM.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 02:46 AM   #25
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally posted by JediDB
How does Mepis vary from Ubuntu?
Well, it will put all your partitions on the desktop, for one. Another is... well, if you want MP3 support, for example, you'll have to enable extra repositories. In Mepis, this can be done in Synaptic with a few clicks of the mouse. In Ubuntu, you have to do some command-line stuff and manually edit a config file (/etc/apt/sources.list).

Quote:
as when i ran the CDLive verison of Ubuntu, it regonised all my hardware and i was able to connect online instantly.
Well, run the live CD of Mepis, too, and see how well it recognizes your hardware. If it recognizes it, I think you'll have an easier time with Mepis. Otherwise, hardware recognition is not a gift horse to be looked in the mouth of.

Quote:
I just couldnt figure out where a control would be for me to access my hardware and change settings.
Well, that's another thing. As I said before, in Mepis, all your partitions will show up on the desktop automatically. In Ubuntu, you're going to have to edit a config file (/etc/fstab) to get that to happen.

Quote:
How do you install printers and there software to Linux?
There's usually a printers configuration icon in the Gnome menu and KMenu. There you just click "add printer," and it'll walk you through the steps. Software you install through Synaptic. You just click on Synaptic Package Manager. Click reload. Search for the software you want, mark each one you want installed as "mark to be installed." Then, when you're finished, click "Apply." That's it. "Reload" checks with the online repositories to see what the most up-to-date list of software there is. Enabling extra repositories means you have more software to choose from.

Quote:
Also, when you dual boot, do you need extra software that enables you to choose which OS to boot from? I heard of people talk of a Grub (spl?)
No. In fact, most distros are set to dual-boot. They usually automatically recognize your Windows partition and add it to the boot menu. Just make sure you install Grub to the MBR when asked.

Oh, that's another thing. Mepis includes, as part of its installation process, a graphical partitioning utility called QTParted (see a screenshot here). Ubuntu's partitioning is all text.

I'm not trying to scare you away from Ubuntu. In fact, I love Ubuntu (I'm using it right at this very moment), but I think Mepis is a good stepping stone for just starting off in Linux. Once you get comfortable with the command-line, Ubuntu is an excellent distro.

The Mepis User Guide (.pdf) may give you a better sense of what the installation process is like.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 06:50 AM   #26
secesh
Senior Member
 
Registered: Sep 2004
Location: Savannah, GA
Distribution: Ubuntu, Gentoo, Mythbuntu, ClarkConnect
Posts: 1,154

Rep: Reputation: 47
I'd like to go back to post 7 to touch on something I think got glossed over in post 8. -- because I think it's a very important topic, more so with every new linux user.

Linux doesn't talk about security much for new users, and so I can understand why a lot of people aren't clear.

I think many linux users are wrong to have such a cavalier attitude towards security. Just because an outstanding majority of viruses are written for microsoft doesn't mean linux can't be affected. I've also heard the improper statement that 'there's no such thing as a virus in linux -- only bad permissions management.'

Fact is -- a virus is simply a script/executable written to capitalize on an exploit. What makes it a virus is it will use any means it knows to try and spread.

The follow-up is that exploits exist in linux. and the only reason we don't have a virus problem like microsoft is because linux doesn't provide a large enough target yet. but we all know that's changing.

So -- as more and more people join the community, i think the community should get more and more concerned about viruses.

I'm not saying the community is failing as a whole -- i know a lot of people are working on projects like clamav and linux is fundamentally more secure than windows. but i whole-heartedly disagree with encouraging the idea that viruses are a microsoft problem.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 09:16 AM   #27
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Hi,

I thought of another question and that it, supposed i was to purchase a newer peice of Hardware such as a AGP card, how would i install the Drivers for this deivce for Linux to regonise it?

Thanks again,
 
Old 07-23-2005, 09:49 AM   #28
Nylex
LQ Addict
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: London, UK
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 7,464

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Edit: misread the question. Some hardware will work out of the box, so to speak. Not all manufacturers provide Linux drivers, though.

Last edited by Nylex; 07-23-2005 at 09:52 AM.
 
Old 07-23-2005, 09:57 AM   #29
JediDB
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2005
Location: USA - IL
Distribution: Mepis
Posts: 131

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 16
Hi,

I just completed more testing of the Ubuntu Linux OS.

Looking in the Device manager, some of my Hardware was not regonised. Is this a bad thing? or do i need to put this question on the Ubuntu Dist. Forum?

Cheers!
 
Old 07-23-2005, 09:59 AM   #30
aysiu
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2005
Distribution: Ubuntu with IceWM
Posts: 1,776

Rep: Reputation: 86
Quote:
Originally posted by secesh
The follow-up is that exploits exist in linux. and the only reason we don't have a virus problem like microsoft is because linux doesn't provide a large enough target yet. but we all know that's changing.
Not everyone agrees with you about this...
http://www.theregister.co.uk/securit...s_linux/#myth1
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Laptop/Linux ----- Suggestions nenyo Linux - Laptop and Netbook 19 07-08-2005 03:55 AM
ISP Suggestions for Linux WarlockofVirgo Linux - Newbie 18 05-29-2004 02:54 AM
Suggestions for my home network - Linux, other (non-Linux) users, Games, etc. lrt2003 Linux - General 5 05-06-2004 09:11 PM
Suggestions on how to learn Linux? frontier1 Linux - General 22 04-01-2003 07:55 PM
Linux Partition Suggestions Comatose51 Linux - General 3 01-29-2003 12:29 AM

LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Newbie

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:34 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration